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Old 07-14-2010, 12:10 PM   #1
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Mung Bean Vermicelli?

Peace everyone! I have been looking for the 'infamous' Shiratake noodles in my city and have not found them today. What I did find was Pure Mung Bean Vermicelli. I read the carb count and they are low carb (4 carbs per 50g serving). Has anyone else tried these?
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Old 07-14-2010, 03:04 PM   #2
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Bean thread noodles? I remember them vaguely, haven't tried them lately, sorry.
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Old 07-14-2010, 07:07 PM   #3
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Reina this is what I found

Mung bean noodles, which are also known as bean thread, glass noodles, vermicelli or cellophane noodles, are a staple in Thai and other Asian cooking, where they are both boiled and deep fried. With their bland taste, mung bean noodles are an excellent addition to flavorful, saucy dishes because they will readily pick up the flavor of broths and sauces.
Basic Nutrition
Mung bean noodle nutrition can vary depending upon the brand and the thickness of the noodle. The nutritional content of a typical mung bean noodle is broken down on the website Temple of Thai. A 1 cup serving contains about 260 calories, with no fat and no protein. The noodles contain a high amount of carbohydrates, with 65g. Of these carbs, only 2g are fiber. Mung bean noodles contain a small amount of calcium, selenium and iron as well.
Ingredients
Most mung bean noodles contain only one ingredient---mung bean flour, or starch, plus water to create the noodle dough. Some mung bean noodles also contain salt, and some are enriched with additional vitamins and minerals. Once formed, the dough is dried into very thin and hard noodles that, WiseGeek.com notes, are often called cellophane noodles due to their similarity in appearance to that plastic. When cooked, however, they become tender and transparent, and may pick up the color of the dish they are cooked in.
Preparation
To get the full nutritional benefit of mung bean noodles, you need to prepare them correctly. In the book "Classic Asian Noodles," Lee Geok Boi outlines two basic modes of preparation: boiling and frying. When you're making a soup or especially saucy dish, the best method of cooking mung bean noodles is to cook them directly in the broth in the last five minutes of cooking. This way, you retain their mineral content. If you're making a drier dish, you can boil them separately for about three minutes before mixing them with the other ingredients. Alternately, you can fry mung bean noodles in a wok with oil, soy sauce and seasonings, adding additional liquid if they dry out, or deep fry them in hot oil for crispy noodles.
Recipes

Read more: Mung Bean Noodle Nutrition | eHow.com Mung Bean Noodle Nutrition | eHow.com
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Old 07-15-2010, 05:52 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbo View Post
Mung bean noodles, which are also known as bean thread, glass noodles, vermicelli or cellophane noodles, are a staple in Thai and other Asian cooking, where they are both boiled and deep fried. With their bland taste, mung bean noodles are an excellent addition to flavorful, saucy dishes because they will readily pick up the flavor of broths and sauces.
Basic Nutrition
Mung bean noodle nutrition can vary depending upon the brand and the thickness of the noodle. The nutritional content of a typical mung bean noodle is broken down on the website Temple of Thai. A 1 cup serving contains about 260 calories, with no fat and no protein. The noodles contain a high amount of carbohydrates, with 65g. Of these carbs, only 2g are fiber. Mung bean noodles contain a small amount of calcium, selenium and iron as well.
Ingredients
Most mung bean noodles contain only one ingredient---mung bean flour, or starch, plus water to create the noodle dough. Some mung bean noodles also contain salt, and some are enriched with additional vitamins and minerals. Once formed, the dough is dried into very thin and hard noodles that, WiseGeek.com notes, are often called cellophane noodles due to their similarity in appearance to that plastic. When cooked, however, they become tender and transparent, and may pick up the color of the dish they are cooked in.
Preparation
To get the full nutritional benefit of mung bean noodles, you need to prepare them correctly. In the book "Classic Asian Noodles," Lee Geok Boi outlines two basic modes of preparation: boiling and frying. When you're making a soup or especially saucy dish, the best method of cooking mung bean noodles is to cook them directly in the broth in the last five minutes of cooking. This way, you retain their mineral content. If you're making a drier dish, you can boil them separately for about three minutes before mixing them with the other ingredients. Alternately, you can fry mung bean noodles in a wok with oil, soy sauce and seasonings, adding additional liquid if they dry out, or deep fry them in hot oil for crispy noodles.
Recipes

Read more: Mung Bean Noodle Nutrition | eHow.com Mung Bean Noodle Nutrition | eHow.com

They don't seem to be low carb from what it says there.
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Old 07-19-2010, 12:06 PM   #5
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Reina, do you have an Asian Market near you. They seem to be the ones that carry them. Julie
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Old 07-19-2010, 04:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginaaaaaa View Post
They don't seem to be low carb from what it says there.
Agree ^^^ They are very high in carbs and have no protein at all or very low fiber.

Nutritional facts on Asian products are tricky. I have a bag of black rice that says it's only 4 grams per 2 cup serving. Now we all know THIS is not right!!

I bought a package of the mung bean noodles once because it said they were only 3 carbs per serving. Nope, wrong. Gave them away.

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lo...n-noodles.html

Last edited by Beeb; 07-19-2010 at 05:14 PM..
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