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Old 11-13-2008, 11:10 AM   #1
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Truvia does not contain pure stevia

it contains rebiana which is derived or extracted from stevia and the other ingredient is erythritol. I have just seen some posts in which people are excited because they think it contains pure stevia-it doesn't. Do your research on this one peeps.

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Old 11-13-2008, 11:28 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lisabinil View Post
it contains rebiana which is derived or extracted from stevia and the other ingredient is erythritol. I have just seen some posts in which people are excited because they think it contains pure stevia-it doesn't. Do your research on this one peeps.
[COLOR="DarkSlateGray"]Hi lisa...
So do you think that makes Truvía bad?

Truvía is largely a stevia extract (approved and accepted by many) combined with Erythritol as a carrier (also accepted by many low carbers, diabetics and other forumites).

We tried and liked it, and if they lower the price so it's affordable to buy and available in bulk, we may buy more. I hate needing to take out a loan to pay for substitute sweeteners.
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Old 11-13-2008, 11:36 AM   #3
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Since I have health issues and am now a more aware consumer-I do think there are several things wrong with this product. But everyone needs to do their own research and decide for themselves. I have no issues with erythritol and didn't say I did. I just wanted to put it out there that it contains rebiana & erythritol not stevia & erythritol.
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Old 11-13-2008, 12:21 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by lisabinil View Post
I do think there are several things wrong with this product. But everyone needs to do their own research and decide for themselves.
Hi Lisa:

I've hardly heard of Truvia OR Rebiana -- is it the processing of the Stevia into Rebiana that can be problematic?

P.S. I'm too lazy to do the research myself -- that's what this forum is for!


Thanks!
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Old 11-13-2008, 12:47 PM   #5
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JMO, of course, but by processing Stevia in that way, they have simply turned it into another AS. After all, one of the advertising points for Splenda is that it "Tastes like sugar, because it's made from sugar." I don't think anyone would consider Splenda to be anything other than an AS.
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Old 11-13-2008, 12:48 PM   #6
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It's not pure stevia anymore-they altered the stevia to make rebiana. Also this is another product that's govt approval has been pushed rapidly through with no long term testing of course-look at the controversy and people getting ill from aspartame. Big corporate $$ in action-Cargill and Merisant are the producers of this product. What first brought it to my attention was an article in Crains Chicago Business on how there 2 corporations were racing each other to get this to consumer-1 company only gave their chemists 3 weeks to come up with a viable product. Then I started doing my own research-for me and it's JMHO this product has not had enough testing and was pushed into the marketplace wayyy too fast.
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Old 11-13-2008, 01:10 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Kisal View Post
JMO, of course, but by processing Stevia in that way, they have simply turned it into another AS.
How is it processed? Run thru chemicals? Heated too high?

Thanks!
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Old 11-13-2008, 01:21 PM   #8
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How is it processed? Run thru chemicals? Heated too high?

Thanks!
Thats the kicker-all the corps will say it is distilled but not exactly how.
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Old 11-13-2008, 02:40 PM   #9
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Thats the kicker-all the corps will say it is distilled but not exactly how.
Ah, I see. Thanks!
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Old 11-13-2008, 04:49 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retroworx View Post
...I've hardly heard of Truvia OR Rebiana -- is it the processing of the Stevia into Rebiana that can be problematic?

P.S. I'm too lazy to do the research myself -- that's what this forum is for!
[COLOR="DarkSlateGray"]Hi retro...
In the pre-publicity it was said that the Rebinia was made from steeping dried leaves of the Stevia plant. That is not distillation, nor can I swear the pre-publicity I saw is what they eventually actually did.

But steeping dried leaves is known around our house as tea, and even though we have processed the tea leaves and are not consuming them in their pure and natural form, I'm not too concerned about the impact on my health. Been steeping leaves and beans (coffee) for years, and enjoying them a lot.

I think Truvía may find it's way into the market, but in reality it's been so poorly and lightly promoted, and is so overpriced it will have a hard time competing with other sugar-free procucts in the market place.

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Old 12-29-2008, 05:51 AM   #11
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Interesting update on Truvia, Coke & the Govt.

Are the FDA and Coca-Cola at War Over Regulatory Power?
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Old 12-29-2008, 07:06 AM   #12
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I enjoyed reading the article. Thanks for the link.
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Old 12-29-2008, 12:21 PM   #13
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This Truvia thing gets more and more interesting. This is from the horses mouth itself-Coke and Cargill. Rebiana is not the same thing as stevia and Truvia contains rebiana. This site has some good info about Truvia for those interested.

"Q: Are TRUVIA™ natural sweetener, rebiana and stevia all the same thing?
A: No. TRUVIA™ is the brand name. Rebiana is the common or usual name for this new ingredient derived from the stevia plant. Stevia is used to describe either the stevia plant or to loosely describe various products derived from the stevia plant."

AllAboutRebiana.com - Home
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Old 12-29-2008, 12:29 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lisabinil View Post
This Truvia thing gets more and more interesting. This is from the horses mouth itself-Coke and Cargill. Rebiana is not the same thing as stevia and Truvia contains rebiana. This site has some good info about Truvia for those interested.

"Q: Are TRUVIA™ natural sweetener, rebiana and stevia all the same thing?
A: No. TRUVIA™ is the brand name. Rebiana is the common or usual name for this new ingredient derived from the stevia plant. Stevia is used to describe either the stevia plant or to loosely describe various products derived from the stevia plant."

AllAboutRebiana.com - Home
I believe the answer is less diabolical than you think. The makers of Truvia have come up with some 'top secret process' (indeed, probably steeping) for processing Stevia and calling it 'Rebiana' so that they can TRADEMARK it. The fact that no one can solely own stevia is probably the reason it has been kept off the market as a sweetener for decades.

Well, now some company has found a way to do that and it will likely be in everything soon.

But that doesn't mean it's anything more or less that stevia.
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Old 12-29-2008, 12:55 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by kitchenwitch2 View Post
I believe the answer is less diabolical than you think. The makers of Truvia have come up with some 'top secret process' (indeed, probably steeping) for processing Stevia and calling it 'Rebiana' so that they can TRADEMARK it. The fact that no one can solely own stevia is probably the reason it has been kept off the market as a sweetener for decades.

Well, now some company has found a way to do that and it will likely be in everything soon.

But that doesn't mean it's anything more or less that stevia.
Never said it was diabolical. They state that Rebiana is not stevia but just an ingredient derived from stevia. How do we know that they have included the healthy parts of pure stevia that lower blood sugars etc? That's my point-stevia has been shown to be healthy in its entirety not in just its derived parts-yet.
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Old 12-29-2008, 04:54 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by lisabinil View Post
How do we know that they have included the healthy parts of pure stevia that lower blood sugars etc?
They haven't included the blood sugar lowering components in Rebiana. Which, imo, is a hugely encouraging development:

Rebiana - Press Release - Press Center - Coca-Cola (See the two studies at the bottom)

The Diterpene Glycoside, Rebaudioside A, Does not Improve Glycemic Control or Affect Blood Pressure After Eight Weeks Treatment in the Goto-Kakizaki Rat

The fact that stevia impacts blood sugar/blood pressure has always caused me to question it's use as a sweetener. Medicine, even one that produces health benefits for people suffering from high blood pressure or diabetes, should still be treated as medicine, not food. For instance, aspirin has been shown to prevent heart attacks- if aspirin were sweet, would you use it for lemonade? Of course not.

If they've been able to separate Stevia's sweet compounds (Rebaudiosides) from the bitter ones (Steviosides), and, in turn, end up with something more physiologically neutral (and research is bearing this out), then that's cause for celebration for the alternative sweetener community, not cause for mistrust.

What pushes the needle on my skepticism meter, though, are claims of purity. Rebiana is supposed to be 99% Rebaudioside, but I'll believe that when I taste it. NuNaturals Soolite was supposed to be pure Rebaudioside as well, but sometimes they'd extract a lot (and the sweetener would be phenomenal) while other times they'd extract less (and the sweetener would be the typical non-edible stevia).

Purity is not my only stickling point. Physiological impact and bitterness were just two of three major stumbling blocks for my adoption of stevia extract into my sweetener arsenal. Price was/is a huge hurdle. Coca Cola (and others) have apparently found ways to simplify/lower the cost of the extraction process, but I highly doubt it will bring Stevia into the cost per cup of sweetening realm that sucralose inhabits.

Still, with these encouraging studies relating to Rebaudioside's lack of physiological impact, I'm light years closer to having stevia extract in my home.

FYI, I did some digging in patent applications and found what I believe might be the process for making Rebiana. It's most likely one of these:

Delivery Systems for Natural High-Potency Sweetener Compositions, Methods for Their Formulation, and Uses - Patent Application 20080292775

HIGH-PURITY REBAUDIOSIDE A AND METHOD OF EXTRACTING SAME - Patent Application 20080300402

For those looking for the cliff notes, it's basically a tincture/filtration process.
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Old 12-29-2008, 05:15 PM   #17
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Thanks for the info and your input. The patent link is especially interesting. I am one of those who are learning the merits of the way the ancient Chinese thought-to treat food as a medication, it elicits chemical responses in the body just as medications do. So I am cautious about things I eat now.

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Old 12-29-2008, 10:10 PM   #18
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I believe the answer is less diabolical than you think. The makers of Truvia have come up with some 'top secret process' (indeed, probably steeping) for processing Stevia and calling it 'Rebiana' so that they can TRADEMARK it. The fact that no one can solely own stevia is probably the reason it has been kept off the market as a sweetener for decades.

Well, now some company has found a way to do that and it will likely be in everything soon.

But that doesn't mean it's anything more or less that stevia.
You are correct. This is a common process to make naturally occuring chemicals able to be patented.

For example, the natural chemical composition of say estrogen will be altered (by adding a seemingly inconsequential methyl group) so that it can be marketed as a unique patented drug.

Unfortunately, Lisibil is correct, even the most minor alterations of naturally occuring molecules can have dangerous consequences as far as human health is concerned.

Research has shown that one form of Vitamin E (naturally occuring) is a heart healthy product and the manmade form has been linked to heart disease. These are identical molecules in every way except for their so-called stereochemistry (for example how your right hand is different from your left one).

To sum it up, these chemical alternations are not ALWAYS made to improve a natural product but simply to make them able to be marketed as a unique patentable product/medication.

This process is probably never in the best interest of the consumer.

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Old 12-30-2008, 03:29 PM   #19
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You are correct. This is a common process to make naturally occuring chemicals able to be patented.

For example, the natural chemical composition of say estrogen will be altered (by adding a seemingly inconsequential methyl group) so that it can be marketed as a unique patented drug.

Unfortunately, Lisibil is correct, even the most minor alterations of naturally occuring molecules can have dangerous consequences as far as human health is concerned.

Research has shown that one form of Vitamin E (naturally occuring) is a heart healthy product and the manmade form has been linked to heart disease. These are identical molecules in every way except for their so-called stereochemistry (for example how your right hand is different from your left one).

To sum it up, these chemical alternations are not ALWAYS made to improve a natural product but simply to make them able to be marketed as a unique patentable product/medication.

This process is probably never in the best interest of the consumer.
See Scott's post above. Per the patent, the process sounds most like a tincturing process, which is a very common, normal and healthy way of making extracts, used by many herbalists, including Chinese and Indian traditional medicine practitioners.
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Old 12-30-2008, 04:29 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenwitch2 View Post
I believe the answer is less diabolical than you think. The makers of Truvia have come up with some 'top secret process' (indeed, probably steeping) for processing Stevia and calling it 'Rebiana' so that they can TRADEMARK it. The fact that no one can solely own stevia is probably the reason it has been kept off the market as a sweetener for decades.

Well, now some company has found a way to do that and it will likely be in everything soon.

But that doesn't mean it's anything more or less that stevia.

THANK YOU!! Finally!
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Old 12-30-2008, 04:32 PM   #21
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Direct from the manufacturer:

Quote:
Truvia.com

Unlike most stevia-based sweeteners, which are typically a mixture of many components from the stevia leaf, Truvia™ natural sweetener is made with rebiana, the best tasting part of the stevia leaf.


Stevia: the plant with a sweet secret

Sweetness born from a leaf, not in a lab. Meet the stevia plant. The proud parent of our new natural sweetener. People have been sweetening foods and beverages with stevia leaves for hundreds of years. The taste comes from a natural ingredient from the leaves called rebiana.

Rebiana is what gives Truvia™ natural sweetener its clean, honest sweet taste. Simple. Who knew going green could be so good?


Rebiana comes from the sweet leaf of the stevia plant, native to South America. Dried stevia leaves are steeped in water, similar to making tea. This unlocks the best tasting part of the leaf which is then purified to provide a calorie-free sweet taste.
Stevia.
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Old 12-30-2008, 05:24 PM   #22
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Ok in the interest of fairness and hoping that this was a good product for me I have been using Truvia since Saturday. 3 fulls days and no other sweetener except for the small amount of Davinci's in my morning coffee. I have had a 2 day headache that is threatening to blossom into a killer migraine. I use a small amount of various sweeteners so I don't think it is withdrawal of any particular one. I am stopping it and using no sweeteners exept for the bit of Davinci's in my coffee tomorrow morning to see if the headache goes away. Also my sinuses are stuffed and I haven't been hungry and feeling unwell. Of course these symptoms may have nothing to do with the Truvia but let's see how I feel tomorrow. I also found out I don't care for the taste that much-I like plain erythritol much better and have no headache issues with it. Also I will repeat this experiment again to see if the same thing happens. This is just me sharing my experience with a new product not trying to tell anyone else what to do.
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Old 12-30-2008, 06:03 PM   #23
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I've been using Truvia for months with no untoward effects. The taste is awesome, very smooth, no bitterness, no aftertaste.

And as a diabetic I love it because it doesn't raise my blood sugar.

I also like the fact that it is made from the stevia leaves and erythritol, both natural and physically beneficial sweeteners, and that taruvia is probably the safest on the market today.

I use it in my daily Egg Cream and I especially love it in my Chocolate Eggs. MMMMMMMMMMMMM!!

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Old 12-31-2008, 05:23 AM   #24
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Marketing of stevia stirs renewed debate on sugar substitutes
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Old 12-31-2008, 07:50 AM   #25
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I have been using Truvia for maybe a month now. One packet every day in my morning bowl of flax cereal.

I haven't noticed any untoward effects. I do use E and Stevia pretty frequently, sometimes with Davinci syrups, sometimes not.

The taste is fine, with no bitterness. It also dissolves perfectly well in the cereal (which is mixed with hot water).

I like it. It's too expensive to buy or use in bulk , so I will probably stay with my usual E+liquid stevia combo for baked goods, for now.
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Old 01-01-2009, 05:22 PM   #26
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See Scott's post above. Per the patent, the process sounds most like a tincturing process, which is a very common, normal and healthy way of making extracts, used by many herbalists, including Chinese and Indian traditional medicine practitioners.
It's more than that in order for a product to be patentable. I know this because I was a Chemistry major, and I recall my organic chem professor discussing this very topic one semester.

You have to change the chemical composition (molecular composition) of a compound from its natural form in order to claim that it is a new product.

My point is simply, these products are not changed to make them better...but simply to make them different from their natural form and therefore marketable as unique products.

These changes may or may not be innocuous as far as human health goes...

So it is not the same thing and it may or may not be an innocous change. There is just no way to know that for sure without years of testing. And these products do not go through years of testing before hitting the marketplace.

We have seen in recent years many drugs having to be recalled or having a warning added to them after passing through FDA safety process and entering the marketplace.

I'm just saying, it's always good to be cautious and if the natural unaltered form of a product is also available...I would always go with that.

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Old 01-28-2009, 08:37 AM   #27
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So Lisa, what did your Truvia experiment yield? Do you think your headaches were the result of using Truvia?
After going about a year without any sweeteners, including pure Stevia, I decided to give Truvia a try. I used 1/2 a packet last week, all was well. Then I used about 2 packets over the weekend in a cup of hot tea. I felt a low level of anxiety for the next day and a half that I was unable to attribute to anything else. Not good. Then, after taking about 2 days of the Truvia (to see whether or not my symptoms were just a coincidence). I used one packet again and had a nasty 2-day headache. Liking the taste of Truvia in my morning cereal and being stubborn ("this just HAS to work"), I had one packet in my cereal this morning. About 20-30 mins later, I just had a weird feeling in my stomach and a general feeling of malaise. I never experienced anything like this when I used pure Stevia. I'm sure I won't be using it again and I pray that that horrible headache doesn't come back. Luckily I found a great coupon AND it was on sale when I purchased it, so I ONLY(!) spent $2.55. Still, I came to the internet to see if there was any info about Truvia + headaches, which is when I found your post. I registered with this group just to find out what you concluded from your experiment. Thanks VERY much for sharing your experience.
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:41 AM   #28
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I didn't retry after the first headaches. I don't have anything to prove to myself and its not worth risking getting a migraine. I don't like the way it tastes either and like you have not had any reactions like this with pure stevia or plain erythritol. I took the box to work and put it in the cafeteria.
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:45 AM   #29
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I hear ya! Thanks for the update. I'm currently between jobs, but I'll probably find someone that might be interested in an almost full box. We're just "sensitive souls" I guess, which I think is a good thing. :-)
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Old 01-28-2009, 11:11 AM   #30
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It's more than that in order for a product to be patentable. I know this because I was a Chemistry major, and I recall my organic chem professor discussing this very topic one semester.

You have to change the chemical composition (molecular composition) of a compound from its natural form in order to claim that it is a new product.
This is correct. However, there is no patent for Truvia or any components in Truvia.

The patents granted were for an extraction process and a delivery method, not a chemical. The problem with stevia, as Scott said, is its bitter substances. What he also alluded to, referencing another stevia product, is that the extraction of the sweet components minus the bitter components is problematic and methods that have been used are unreliable. Patenting a reliable method for extraction of the sweet components gives a company complete control over those chemicals -- including pricing of them -- until someone else invents a different way to extract those compounds or the original patent expires.
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