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Old 08-02-2006, 09:49 AM   #1
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ice cream

I was looking at the ingred in some low carb ice cream bars and I noticed it had both inulin and polyd. I thought inulin was close to the same as polyd so what would be the purpose in both? I also noticed it had glycerine--what does that do?
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Old 08-02-2006, 08:02 PM   #2
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Inulin and polyd are very very similar. Almost identical. I'm guessing they are both being used for one of two reasons. Even though the two ingredients provide the same health benefits, inulin, being a plant extract, is perceived as healthier. It definiitely isn't healthier, but the perception is powerful enough that a lot of manufacturers shell out the extra money to include inulin in their formulas.

Inulin is polymerized fructose and polyd is polymerized glucose. Neither is 100% polymers- each has slight traces of their respective sugar. Fructose displays a strange magnifying sweetness in frozen applications. It's possible the inulin is present for the trace amount of fructose it contains.

Glycerine provides some sweetness, but it's major role is freezing point depression. Although it's a powerful freezing point depressor and a useful tool for creating scoopable ice cream, the quantity of glycerine has to be limited due to it's taste. At large quantities, it provides a noticeable metallic flavor/burning sensation that's not very palatable.

When it comes to ice cream, it's a big balancing act. Some polyd/inulin is good, but too much and the end result is chewy. Some glycerine is helpful but too much and the ice cream tastes strange. Erythritol is a phenomenal freezing point depressor, but too much and you have crystallization/graininess (polyd combine with the e helps). Soluble gums (xanthan/guar/thickenthin) are great for controlling ice crystal size but too much and you risk making the ice cream gummy. Lecithin is a great emulsifier, but too much and the taste is impaired.

All these ingredients are incredibly helpful for making the best lc ice cream, but all can also be equally damaging when used to excess.
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Old 08-03-2006, 03:31 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scott123
At large quantities, it provides a noticeable metallic flavor/burning sensation that's not very palatable.
Scott, what are you considering large quantities of glycerine?
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Old 08-03-2006, 06:45 AM   #4
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I have noticed, Kevin, a long thread some place elsewhere where you also go (your "hometown" so to speak) about green tea ice cream. I think you have developed mint chocolate chip to perfection.

I know where it is, but would you care to share for others without dual citizenship??

And for your money, which are the best ice cream recipes?

I have the machines--two kinds, a Cuisenart and a Donvier--but lack freezer room for the tub. Oh, the pain of being a horder for all things to cook with--nut flours, flax seed, etc, etc. I could manage though for good stuff without a bunch of the nastier sugar alcohols.
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Old 08-03-2006, 07:40 AM   #5
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Thanks for the info. I'm really wanting to make some homemade ice cream but I'm real picky and if it doesn't turn out right (texture-wise as well as taste) I'd be real disappointed so I'm trying to learn as much as I can. I'm not one for making up my own recipes--creativity just doesn't exist for me--so I take another recipe as a start and then tweak away.
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Old 08-04-2006, 06:45 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magnamater
I think you have developed mint chocolate chip to perfection.
I guess the first thing I have to say here is I hope I didn't come across sounding like I had perfection. The thread you speak of was basically an experimental thread where several people tried variations of a recipe. I know that I tried 2 different versions but never tried to duplicate my results. My last try was a very good tasting chocolate mint flavor (IMHO) that had a soft smooth texture when it was done and was firm but spoonable with a good texture at 12 hours but it never made it past that point.

Now with that said, I will post my last try as an unproven recipe.

Mint Chocolate Chip

4 egg yokes
250 ml. hood lc 2 % milk
100 ml davinci Creme de Menthe syrup
1/2 c. equivilant liquid splenda
5 t. ThickenThin not/ Sugar
2 T. glycerine
1 oz. Nestles pre-melted unsweetened chocolate
200 ml. half/half

3 T. Eat Well Be Well SF chocolate Chips(2 mins before it was done I added these)

In a stainless steel sauce pan I combined the above ingredient over medium heat(never letting it boil) till I had a thick (coat your spoon) base.
I mixed the ThickenThin not/ Sugar with a small amount of 1 of the liquids in a small jar before heating then added it to the mixture to prevent clumping.

I then followed the instructions of my ice cream maker.

This was a picture at 12 hours.
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Old 08-04-2006, 06:52 AM   #7
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I do simple fruit "ice creams" in about 2 minutes -and it's great!
Using a 3 cup mini food processor, put in about 1/2 cup frozen fruit (strawberries, mixed berries, peaches -whatever you like), 2 packets splenda and about 1/4 cup half and half for starters. Process in pulses to break up fruit. Once it's broken up, process for about 15-20 seconds to smooth and blend, adding more half and half if needed.
(I've also done this with the same fruit flavored no-sugar yogurt in place of the sweetener and 1/2&1/2 and it's great too).

This comes out very refreshing and not 'heavy' at all
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Old 08-04-2006, 07:32 AM   #8
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Kevin you didn't say perfection, your picture did! I need to read better. . .didn't get that about 12 hours. . .but hmmm, do you think it would last longer than 12 hours????
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Old 08-04-2006, 07:40 AM   #9
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lol....in this house, Ice cream never lasts more than 12 hours

I'm sure it would but it will never be commercial texture without the s/a, polyd and the gas.

I did order some pure isomalt and plan on trying that in ice cream.

Last edited by Kevinpa; 08-04-2006 at 07:42 AM..
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Old 08-04-2006, 09:13 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevinpa
Scott, what are you considering large quantities of glycerine?
I did some research in an attempt to find out how much glycerine in ice cream is too much and couldn't find any specifics.

This quote from Food Technology International sums up the ice cream industry stance:

Quote:
Glycerine is useful because of its strong freezing-point
depression effect. However, its use is limited by its laxative
effect, its potential to alter flavour and by the possibility of an
adverse consumer reaction to its presence.
One approach that I thought might help shed some light on glycerine quantities is to analyze a specific brand.

These are the ingredients and nutrition facts for Breyers Carbsmart Vanilla Ice Cream:

Serving Size 1/2 cup (66 g)
Servings Per Container 14
Amount Per Serving
Calories 120
Calories from Fat 80
Total Fat 9g
Saturated Fat 6g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 25mg
Sodium 25mg
Total Carbohydrates 10g
Dietary Fiber 3g
Sugars 4g
Sugar Alcohol 3g
Protein 2g

Milk, cream, polydextrose, sorbitol, fructose, glycerine, natural flavors, mono and diglycerides, cellulose gel, cellulose gum, guar gum, xanthan gum, carob bean gum, polysorbate 80, sucralose, acesulfame potassium.

In another discussion, a member was concerned about Carbsmart's fructose content. I did a little reverse engineering and came up with 1.5 g fructose per serving. Since glycerine appears after fructose in the ingredient list, that would translate into less than 1.5 g glycerine per 66 g serving (by weight). That comes out to be about 2 percent glycerine.

Glycerine is denser than milk/cream, so converting the percentage to volume gets a little sketchy, but roughly speaking, that's less than a teaspoon of glycerin per cup of liquid ingredients.

A teaspoon or less per cup of liquid is, imo, a safe zone of usage. Much more than that and I think you're asking for trouble. If your ice cream is strongly flavored, it might give you a little leeway, but I still wouldn't go too much higher than 2 teaspoons.

Glycerine performs valiantly in the freezing point depression role, but it's taste issues mandate that other freezing point depressors be included in the mix. A great team player, but not a starring role.
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Old 08-04-2006, 09:47 PM   #11
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Thanks Scott, it appears my 2 T in the recipe above would be a tad too high then.
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Old 08-04-2006, 10:38 PM   #12
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Well... this is a subjective area we're talking about here. Although I'm apt to follow the lead of the ice cream manufacturers with their teams of food scientists and huge focus groups, without any specific information relating to excessive glycerin use, nothing is concrete. My gut feeling is that it's probably a bit too much, but that's just me. If you're happy with it, and it isn't causing you any digestive issues, then that might be the best choice for you.

How about making up a vanilla batch? That should give you a clearer perspective of the taste glycerin is bringing to the table.
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Old 02-09-2007, 04:05 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dottie View Post
I do simple fruit "ice creams" in about 2 minutes -and it's great!
Using a 3 cup mini food processor, put in about 1/2 cup frozen fruit (strawberries, mixed berries, peaches -whatever you like), 2 packets splenda and about 1/4 cup half and half for starters. Process in pulses to break up fruit. Once it's broken up, process for about 15-20 seconds to smooth and blend, adding more half and half if needed.
(I've also done this with the same fruit flavored no-sugar yogurt in place of the sweetener and 1/2&1/2 and it's great too).

This comes out very refreshing and not 'heavy' at all
Hi ~ Do you put this in an ice cream machine or just freeze it as is? Thanks for any help.
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