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Old 02-08-2006, 05:46 PM   #1
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Erythritol, Powdered

I bought powdered erythritol and now I have a few questions about using it.

1. Can this take the place of regular powdered sugar in recipes?

2. I've read on this board that erythritol has a 'cooling' effect. Does this also pertain to the powdered version?

3. If the powdered version does have the cooling effect, what do I need to mix with it to get it to replicate regular powdered sugar in a recipe that calls for a cup of powdered sugar for example?

Appreciate the help!
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Old 02-08-2006, 06:25 PM   #2
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Until Scott123 gets here with a proper answer, I can tell you right away:
1. no
2. yes
3. oh, Scotttttttt.....

You would definitely not want to use it cup for cup to replace sugar, if for no other reason than it's expensive!

I'm not sure about the powdered sugar substitutions. I tend to use it to substitute for granulated sugar, combined with polydextrose, Sweetzfree, and Sweet One.

The man with the mad sweetening skillz will be along soon, I hope.
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Old 02-08-2006, 06:41 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by binki
Until Scott123 gets here with a proper answer, I can tell you right away:
1. no
2. yes
3. oh, Scotttttttt.....

You would definitely not want to use it cup for cup to replace sugar, if for no other reason than it's expensive!

I'm not sure about the powdered sugar substitutions. I tend to use it to substitute for granulated sugar, combined with polydextrose, Sweetzfree, and Sweet One.

The man with the mad sweetening skillz will be along soon, I hope.
Exactly !

Binki, I agree 100% with all your above statements

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Old 02-08-2006, 07:24 PM   #4
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I throw regular erythritol in a blender and 'powder' it. It's the same stuff, cooling effect and all but it looks and feels like powdered sugar.
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Old 02-09-2006, 05:44 AM   #5
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There are two brands of erythritol that you can order from Netrition: one comes in a gold bag and I think it's called Low Carb Success. The other (I think) is in a clear bag with a yellow label on it. Anyway, the Low Carb Success brand looks like powdered sugar and has very little (if any -- I can't taste it) cooling effect. The other brand looks like granulated sugar and tastes "cool" or "minty." I've only used the Low Carb Success brand like confectioners sugar to dust the tops of things and it works pretty well, but it clumps up more than real confectioners sugar and doesn't melt quite as well. I don't know how it would work as a substitute stirred into the recipes, although as a substitute for regular sugar I think it's just fantastic stirred into recipes. I'll usually mix a couple of spoonsful with Splenda and it really improves the taste and texture.
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Old 02-09-2006, 07:32 AM   #6
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I use granulated Erythritol all the time, but I always mix it with Liquid Splenda to minimize the "cooling" effect. It seems that things take on a "spicy" feel if I use too much. I've run it through the blender to make it powdered and that worked fine.
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Old 02-09-2006, 11:50 PM   #7
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Powdered erythritol doesn't make a good sub for powdered sugar Powdered sugar, when used in baking, is almost always present in the final product in an undissolved state. Any erythritol, either granular or powdered, that isn't dissolved is going to give you a strong cooling effect.

As long as the e is undissolved, there's nothing you can add to it that will prevent it from cooling. Polyd is a fantastic crystallization inhibitor once the e is dissolved but won't do anything for e in the undissolved state. Besides, polyd might have clumping issues of it's own if it comes into contact with any moisture.

When I need powdered sugar, I use a tiny amount of maltitol. If maltitol is not within your sphere of tolerance... honestly... my recommendation is to write off the idea of powdered sugar altogether. It might work for mint confections or cold items, but besides those, I wouldn't use powdered e as a sub for powdered sugar in anything else. There are a few people that have no issues with the cooling effect. Not me. The sensation is just too unnatural for me.

The trick to working with e is to dissolve it and keep it dissolved. As long as it stays dissolved in your baked good, there is zero cooling effect. That's how I work with erythritol. That's where polyd comes into play - helping to keep the e dissolved.

Did you have a particular recipe in mind? Although dipping something in powdered e isn't an option, there are many traditional recipes that utilize powdered sugar that could be made with a dissolved e/polyd combo. You won't get the milky opacity in things like fondant and fudge, but you will get a sugary/corn syrupy texture. I haven't tried it yet, but I'm pretty sure an e/polyd icing is feasible.
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Old 02-10-2006, 07:11 AM   #8
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Quote:
The trick to working with e is to dissolve it and keep it dissolved. As long as it stays dissolved in your baked good, there is zero cooling effect. That's how I work with erythritol. That's where polyd comes into play - helping to keep the e dissolved.
Scott, could you expand on that a little? I'd love to get rid of that cooling effect. I mainly taste it in my cheesecake. I also use it in pumpkin concoctions, but usually the spices mask the side-effect pretty well. I've not been able to actually dissolve Erythritol successfully.
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Old 02-10-2006, 09:10 AM   #9
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Has anyone tried make a frosting/icing with powdered e as a sub for regular powdered sugar? Would it work and get the right consistency of a buttercream?
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Old 02-10-2006, 12:26 PM   #10
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Actually Scott123 what I wanted to make is frosting like buttercream. I'm not a big fan of creamcheese frosting at all. Here is the recipe I wanted to convert using the powdered e and before anyone asks why I don't use another AS it's because e is the only one that doesn't cause my sugar to rise. The rest of them cause a rise just like real sugar does.

Basic Butter Frosting

2 tablespoons butter
1 cup confectioners sugar
2 tablespoons milk, cream, sherry, rum or brandy
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Cream butter and sugar well, add the flavoring and liquid until mixture is smooth.

Also would a glaze recipe work with e? I really don't like frosting that much, but I wanted to try a lemon cake with a lemon glaze.

Thanks!
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Old 02-11-2006, 03:05 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theredhead
Scott, could you expand on that a little? I'd love to get rid of that cooling effect. I mainly taste it in my cheesecake. I also use it in pumpkin concoctions, but usually the spices mask the side-effect pretty well. I've not been able to actually dissolve Erythritol successfully.
Laurie, although it may seem that the erythritol didn't dissolve, what actually occured is that the erythritol dissolved, and, as it cooled, it crystallized.

Erythritol likes being in a crystal/granular state. Preventing crystallization is a two prong effort. For lack of better terminology I call the two approaches distance and clutter.

Distance

A cup of erythritol dissolved in a cup of hot water will crystallize as the water cools. A 1/4 of a teaspoon won't. Why is this? When you've got a cup of erythritol dissolved in a cup of water, the molecules are so close together that it's easy for them to bond/form crystals. With 1/4 teaspoon, the molecules are so far apart in the water, it's dificult for them to bond. If the dissolved erythritol molecules aren't close enough to each other to bond, they can't form crystals.

What does this mean? The greater the concentration of erythritol in a solution, the greater the tendency towards crystallization.

Clutter

Besides putting physical distance between the molecules attempting to bond, you can pack that space with other dissolved solids such as polyd. Polyd is a powerful crytallization inhibitor. It gets in the way and make crystallization a lot more difficult. In actuality any solid/fat creates a barrier but polyd performs the barrier role exceedingly well because of the large size of the molecule and the fact that it will never crystallize.

In cheesecake, you've got casein particles from the cream cheese, fat globules, an egg protein matrix, casein from the sour cream, dissolved salt and water (off the top of my head). As you cook the cheesecake, the water content decreases and whatever erythritol is in it becomes more concentrated, i.e. the molecules move closer together. The dissolved/undissolved particles will only prevent crystallization to an extent. Too much erythritol and crystallization will occur, resulting in a sandy texture and strong cooling effect. How much is 'too much?' Well... it depends on the other ingredients in the recipe. Generally speaking, if you're using the erythritol to replace all of the missing bulk in a sugar based recipe with a little splenda for synergy, you're almost guaranteed crystallization. Without a crystillazation inhibitor such as polyd, even small amounts of erythritol (1/3 C. to 1 C. liquid) will have a tendency to crystallize easily, regardless of the other ingredients present. Polyd and erythritol are, as I have said many times, a match made in heaven, for many more reasons than just crystallization prevention.

If you're willing to go the polyd route, that's what I'd recommend. If not, then I'd only use erythritol in extremely small amounts for synergistic sweetening, utilizing trial and error for each recipe to find out the maximum that can be used without crystallization occuring.

I've been giving thought to whether powdered erythritol serves any purpose. Up until yesterday I would have said no. It occured to me that powdered erythritol, due to the dispersement/smaller size of the crystals, might stay dissolved better in baked goods. Maybe. We'll have to test it.
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Old 02-11-2006, 03:11 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrosser
Here is the recipe I wanted to convert using the powdered e and before anyone asks why I don't use another AS it's because e is the only one that doesn't cause my sugar to rise.
Hmmmm... what does polyd do to your sugar levels? How about isomalt (diabetisweet)?

Have you ever considered using NotSugar? I normally don't recommend it, but due to your glycemic sensitivity to sweeteners, it might be a good option. I think frosting might be an application where it works well.
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Old 02-11-2006, 06:17 AM   #13
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Thanks, Scott, for the excellent explanation about the properties of E. When I'm trying to sub it in a recipe for all Splenda, I normally start with a little less than half and then use Liquid Splenda for the rest. In my cheesecake, for instance, I don't think crystalization is a problem. The texture is very good, but I DO taste a bit of the "cooling". I'll try backing off further and see how it goes. In my recipe, I use 20 oz. cream cheese, 1/4 cup E, and 17 drops of L.S. How much Polyd would you recommend adding to enhance the dissolution of the E? Thanks.
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Old 02-11-2006, 08:54 AM   #14
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Scott while I do have the AS's you mentioned, I haven't really played around with them that much to see how my BGL's react. Diabetisweet causes a small rise in comparison to granular Splenda and other granulars. Maltitol, even the smallest amount, causes a huge surge that causes my levels to stay high well into the next day.

Right now I'm trying to come up with a decent mixture to use in baked goods since all the recipes I've tried using a majority of granular AS's and some liquids effect me big time even though it's low carb. For some reason the lower the carbs the more insulin I must use. A good example is bread. I can eat 2 pieces of light wheat bread that has a total carb count of 14 and 5U's of insulin will cover it, however if I eat something that has 3 grams of sugar alcohol in it, like maltitol, it takes 10-15U's to cover it. Doesn't make sense to me.

I tried a recipe on here for cream cheese muffins using DaVinci's and had the same reaction. 2 muffins gave me as big of a rise as if I'd eaten a whole grain muffin with regular sugar!

However anything I eat that has erythritol in it has no effect at all and that's why I'm trying to figure out how and what to mix it with to make a decent baked good.
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Old 02-13-2006, 04:18 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theredhead
Thanks, Scott, for the excellent explanation about the properties of E. When I'm trying to sub it in a recipe for all Splenda, I normally start with a little less than half and then use Liquid Splenda for the rest. In my cheesecake, for instance, I don't think crystalization is a problem. The texture is very good, but I DO taste a bit of the "cooling". I'll try backing off further and see how it goes. In my recipe, I use 20 oz. cream cheese, 1/4 cup E, and 17 drops of L.S. How much Polyd would you recommend adding to enhance the dissolution of the E? Thanks.
Laurie, I've been thinking about your cheesecake- you might be right. Granular e really requires boiling liquid to dissolve properly. Unless you overcook it, cheesecake never makes it to a boiling temp. Besides adding polyd, I would incorporate the erythritol differently, either in a powdered form or making a syrup.

Adding the erythritol in a powdered form is no guarantee of dissolution and since the polyd needs special handling as well, I think a syrup is the way to go.

I've been playing around with polyd/e syrups lately to see how much e I can squeeze into it without the e precipitating out as crystals as it cools. I tried a 2:2:1 syrup (2 parts polyd, 2 parts e, 1 part water) and that was crystal city at room temp. Just now I gave a shot at 3:1:1. That was okay until it hit about 70, but the room temp dropped to 64 overnight and a few random crystals started to form. Still, though, I think this could be a good number- by the time you add the syrup to the other ingredients, there will be plenty of clutter/distance to keep the erythritol from crystallizing. With this in mind, here's how I would add polyd to your cake:

20 oz. cream cheese
Make a syrup with:
...9 T. polyd (1/2 C. + 1 T.)
...3 T. E
...3 T. water
...17 drops of L.S.

3 T. of water is a bit to add to the recipe but I don't think it should impact it all that greatly. If you wanted to avoid the extra water, you could blend the polyd with the eggs and use powdered erythritol, but as I said before, there's no guarantees the powdered e will work. I think a syrup will involve a much greater chance for success.

I would make the entire cheesecake batter with the eggs and the cream cheese and then slowly blend the warm syrup into that. Ideally you'll want the syrup as hot as possible, but not too hot to cook the eggs.

The amount of polyd, the amount of water, the temperature of the syrup and the incorporation process are all a little overkill, but they should guarantee zero crystallization/zero cooling effect. As you make this successfully, you might want to experiment with cutting back on the water and/or polyd and/or going with powdered e.

You also might need to adjust the liquid splenda. With all of the erythritol in a dissolved state, this cake will probably taste sweeter.

Last edited by scott123; 02-13-2006 at 04:23 AM..
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Old 02-13-2006, 04:40 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrosser
Scott while I do have the AS's you mentioned, I haven't really played around with them that much to see how my BGL's react. Diabetisweet causes a small rise in comparison to granular Splenda and other granulars. Maltitol, even the smallest amount, causes a huge surge that causes my levels to stay high well into the next day.

Right now I'm trying to come up with a decent mixture to use in baked goods since all the recipes I've tried using a majority of granular AS's and some liquids effect me big time even though it's low carb. For some reason the lower the carbs the more insulin I must use. A good example is bread. I can eat 2 pieces of light wheat bread that has a total carb count of 14 and 5U's of insulin will cover it, however if I eat something that has 3 grams of sugar alcohol in it, like maltitol, it takes 10-15U's to cover it. Doesn't make sense to me.

I tried a recipe on here for cream cheese muffins using DaVinci's and had the same reaction. 2 muffins gave me as big of a rise as if I'd eaten a whole grain muffin with regular sugar!

However anything I eat that has erythritol in it has no effect at all and that's why I'm trying to figure out how and what to mix it with to make a decent baked good.
Maltitol is definitely high GI. I don't measure my bg, but I'm miserable after consuming maltitol. Maltitol syrup is even worse. Huge sugar buzz and then vicious crash.

Rhonda, you mentioned 'liquids' giving you a problem. Is liquid splenda giving you a problem?

I'm curious, besides Davinci's what was in the cream cheese muffins? Have you tried isolating the Davinci's and consuming it with something like tea and testing your bg with that?

Granular splenda contains maltodextrin, as I'm sure you know. Maltodextrin comes in different forms, but it can have a higher GI than sugar.

Unless you're okay with a very strong cooling effect powdered e just doesn't work on it's own. It's also not very sweet (70% as sweet as sugar), so you'd have to use a lot more of it. I guess if you wanted something like a mint chocolate icing, the cooling effect from the e might be alright. Otherwise, if you can tolerate it, polyd, as I mentioned earlier, works beautifully with erythritol. Liquid splenda would be ideal as well if that works for you.

It is possible that even though the Davinci's has no carbs, just the sweet taste is triggering a response from your body. Hopefully that's not the case and the liquid splenda works for you.
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Old 02-13-2006, 05:33 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scott123
Maltitol is definitely high GI. I don't measure my bg, but I'm miserable after consuming maltitol. Maltitol syrup is even worse. Huge sugar buzz and then vicious crash.

[COLOR=Red]Same here. Maltitol not only causes me stomach distress, but I get bad headaches.[/COLOR]

Rhonda, you mentioned 'liquids' giving you a problem. Is liquid splenda giving you a problem?

[COLOR=Red]Yes. Splenda in any form causes my BGL to rise.[/COLOR]

I'm curious, besides Davinci's what was in the cream cheese muffins? Have you tried isolating the Davinci's and consuming it with something like tea and testing your bg with that?

[COLOR=Red]Cream cheese, eggs and vanilla.[/COLOR]

[COLOR=Red]I have tried DaVinci's in tea and coffee. Everytime I get a rise.[/COLOR]

Otherwise, if you can tolerate it, polyd, as I mentioned earlier, works beautifully with erythritol. Liquid splenda would be ideal as well if that works for you.

[COLOR=Red]Would liquid Stevia work? It doesn't bother me. I just bought some and didn't have a problem.[/COLOR]

It is possible that even though the Davinci's has no carbs, just the sweet taste is triggering a response from your body. Hopefully that's not the case and the liquid splenda works for you.
[COLOR=Red]I think you have hit the nail on the head. I believe anything that has Splenda in it causes my body to think it's real sugar. This has been going on ever since I started using Splenda and I thought it was all in my mind. Thanks for letting me see I'm not entirely off my rocker! I mentioned this to my doctor and she said she never heard anyone say that about Splenda before. However when I told her that meat also makes my BGL rise, she said she had another patient tell her the same thing. So I guess it's possible Splenda would do the same thing.[/COLOR]
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Old 02-13-2006, 08:02 PM   #18
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Scott123: It is possible that even though the Davinci's has no carbs, just the sweet taste is triggering a response from your body. Hopefully that's not the case and the liquid splenda works for you.

I forgot to mention that at 6PM my BGL was 94. I took 5U's of insulin and drank a glass of Chocolate Hood's Carb Countdown, which as you know, is made with sucralose. I just re-tested at 10:45PM and my BGL is now 154!
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Old 02-15-2006, 03:49 AM   #19
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Rhonda, liquid stevia has a good synergy with erythritol, so I think those will work well together in baking. Without a decent crystallization inhibitor like polyd, though, you're going to have to keep your erythritol quantities low- somewhere around 75% of the sweetness coming from the stevia and 25% from the erythritol sounds about right.

I would get some ace k and see how it affects your bg. Stevia, erythritol and a little bit of ace k might give you an okay sweetening mix.

As far as the icing goes... I don't that's going to be an option. Without polyd, for the quantities of erythritol you'd require to get the proper texture... you're talking a strong cooling effect. Sorry... other than a mint chocolate powdered erythritol icing, I don't think anything else will work. Even in the presence of mint, I think the cooling effect of the erythritol might taste strange.

I'm also sorry to hear about your issues with sucralose. I know this is kind of a long shot, but do you have any liquid splenda that's pure sucralose in water? I know Davinci's is pretty close to being a pure sucralose solution, but just to be absolutely sure sucralose is the culprit, you might want to obtain some pure liquid splenda. If that spiked your bg, then it would be the final nail in the coffin.
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Old 02-15-2006, 04:14 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by scott123
Rhonda, liquid stevia has a good synergy with erythritol, so I think those will work well together in baking. Without a decent crystallization inhibitor like polyd, though, you're going to have to keep your erythritol quantities low- somewhere around 75% of the sweetness coming from the stevia and 25% from the erythritol sounds about right.

I would get some ace k and see how it affects your bg. Stevia, erythritol and a little bit of ace k might give you an okay sweetening mix.

As far as the icing goes... I don't that's going to be an option. Without polyd, for the quantities of erythritol you'd require to get the proper texture... you're talking a strong cooling effect. Sorry... other than a mint chocolate powdered erythritol icing, I don't think anything else will work. Even in the presence of mint, I think the cooling effect of the erythritol might taste strange.

I'm also sorry to hear about your issues with sucralose. I know this is kind of a long shot, but do you have any liquid splenda that's pure sucralose in water? I know Davinci's is pretty close to being a pure sucralose solution, but just to be absolutely sure sucralose is the culprit, you might want to obtain some pure liquid splenda. If that spiked your bg, then it would be the final nail in the coffin.


Scott,
I think the best way to come up with a solution is for me to tell you what types of sweetners that I have. Hopefully you'll be able to help me come up with a good synergy that will have the least impact on my BGL.

Granular Splenda
Stevia packets and liquid
DaVinci's- All kinds of flavors as well as 'simple syrup'
Sweet One packets
Xylitol
Erythritol, granular and powdered
Diabetisweet, white and brown
Polyd
Fiber Fit

That's about it I think. Do you see any possibilities in my list or do I need to get something else?

Thanks for the help!
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Old 02-15-2006, 06:17 PM   #21
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Rhonda, you've got everything you need. The only question is what can you tolerate bg wise. From what I can tell, you've got some testing to do. The Sweet One packets- you need to put about 1/4 packet in a half cup of water, drink it and see how that effects you. A 1/4 packet is a lot more than an average dose, but better have too much than too little. This is very little sweetener overall and should be fine bg wise.

The polyd- you'll need to make a polyd syrup by microwaving 3 T. polyd and 1/2 C. water, letting it cool, drinking it and then checking your numbers. 3 T. is a pretty hefty dose of polyd. When you get into cake with icing, though, that could be typical. Most of the studies show polyd to be very low glycemic but I do know of a diabetic who gets a spike with polyd, so do whatever you have to do to be prepared.

The last thing I need you to do is test a hefty dose of diabetisweet. Make a syrup with 3 T. diabetisweet in 1/2 C. water, let cool, drink and measure. The diabetisweet could be your answer to real frosting, but it will involve a LOT of it. I know you said the rise from diabetisweet is less than splenda, but I need to know how much less before I start recommending using a ton of it.

Once we know how well you tolerate polyd, sweet one and diabetisweet, we can proceed from there. The sucralose (fiberfit, Davinci's, granular splenda) is not an option. It's going to be hard to work around, but let's cross our fingers that sweet one, polyd and diabetisweet don't give you much of a spike.
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Old 02-15-2006, 06:42 PM   #22
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Thank you Scott. I'll try your suggestions tomorrow. It'll take at least 6 hours to allow enough time to test properly. 2 hours is when you normally peak, but I have been known to take longer. At this point I'm ready to try anything!
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Old 02-16-2006, 05:31 PM   #23
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Scott I tried what you suggested and the good news is I had no to very little increase in my BGL.
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Old 02-17-2006, 12:02 AM   #24
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Rhonda, did you drink all three at the same time?!? The sweet one, the polyd AND the diabetisweet? I think my post might have been misleading, I'm sorry. I was hoping you would consume each separately in case one triggered a response but not all toghether. I also think consuming them separately would have been safer. Thank goodness you're okay!

So, you're absolutely certain. Diabetisweet triggers little to no response. Polyd triggers little to no response. Sweet One ace k triggers little to no response. I'm sorry to sound obtuse here, I just want to be absolutely clear before we proceed.

How did your tummy feel? Any gastric issues?

Last edited by scott123; 02-17-2006 at 12:05 AM..
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Old 02-17-2006, 09:44 AM   #25
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Scott I did comsume them separately in the AM, lunchtime and evening. No distress or anything. When I said small rise I meant like a 84 reading only went to a 86 reading and that was from the polyd.
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Old 02-17-2006, 02:17 PM   #26
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Rhonda, I started crunching numbers and looking at proportions. Things are looking pretty good, but my eye keeps going to xylitol. I'm sorry to ask this, but could you do one more test?

3 T. xylitol
1/2 C. water

Microwave until xylitol is melted, let cool, drink.

This will be the last test, I promise.

I was also considering the liquid stevia- I know that you said that it doesn't give you a spike, but what do you think of the taste? Do you detect any bitterness when you use it? What brand of liquid stevia are you using? And the stevia packets, are those steviaplus?
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Old 02-17-2006, 07:49 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scott123
Rhonda, I started crunching numbers and looking at proportions. Things are looking pretty good, but my eye keeps going to xylitol. I'm sorry to ask this, but could you do one more test?

3 T. xylitol
1/2 C. water

Microwave until xylitol is melted, let cool, drink.

This will be the last test, I promise.

[COLOR=Red]Scott I will try this tomorrow, but I have used Xylitol many times w/o any problems.[/COLOR]

I was also considering the liquid stevia- I know that you said that it doesn't give you a spike, but what do you think of the taste? Do you detect any bitterness when you use it? What brand of liquid stevia are you using? And the stevia packets, are those steviaplus?
[COLOR=Red]The taste of the packets and liquid have a slight bitterness at first, but I get a lingering sweet taste afterwards. Right now I only have SweetLeaf Stevia Clear liquid and Now brand packets of Stevia Extract. [/COLOR]
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Old 02-18-2006, 01:16 PM   #28
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Ok Scott I tried it and didn't have a problem. What's my next step?

Thanks for all your help.
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Old 02-19-2006, 09:14 AM   #29
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Okay, here we go.

First thing, take your

Granular Splenda
DaVinci's- All kinds of flavors as well as 'simple syrup'
Fiber Fit

and either give it away or bury it in the back of a cabinet. If sucralose is giving you that much of a spike, you probably shouldn't be using it.

Next, here's how I'd approach an everyday mix. When a recipe says to use 1 cup splenda (or 1 cup sugar) use one of these two mixes:

Mix 1

1/4 C. Granular Erythritol
1/4 C. Xylitol
1/4 C. White Diabetisweet
1/4 C. Polyd

Mix 2

3 T. Granular Erythritol
3 T. Xylitol
3 T. White Diabetisweet
1/2 C. Polyd
2 drops SteviaClear Liquid

Mix 1 will taste better, but could have issues with crystallization, depending on the recipe. Mix 2 should have less crystallization issues. I would start working with mix 1. If you're getting a strong cooling effect or sandiness in your baked goods, give number 2 a shot.

As far as the icing is concerned. Here's how I'd do it:

Powdered Sugar for Rhonda

1/3 C. White Diabetisweet
1 T. xylitol
1/8 t. Xanthan Gum

In a spice grinder or blender, blend until extremely fine powder.

Basic Butter Frosting

2 tablespoons butter
1 batch powdered sugar from above
2 tablespoons milk, cream, sherry, rum or brandy
1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Cream butter and fake powdered sugar well, add the flavoring and liquid until mixture is smooth.
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Old 02-19-2006, 06:23 PM   #30
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Thanks Scott. I really, really appreciate all your help with this. I will try your suggestions and let you know how it goes.
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