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Old 11-08-2005, 08:56 PM   #1
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Polyd Pecan Pie

As promised, here's my tried and true polyd pecan pie recipe. At least here's the recipe for the filling I'm still ironing out the kinks in the crust.

Polyd Pecan Pie

One 9" lightly pre-baked pie shell

6 tablespoons lightly salted butter

1 1/2 t. blackstrap molasses
2 t. vanilla extract
12 drops extra concentrated liquid splenda or 1/2 C. granular
5 T. cold water

3 large eggs

1/4 t. salt
1/2 C. erythritol
1 C. polyd (lightly dispensed)
1/16 t. Sweet One Ace K

2 cups frozen pecan halves (8 ounces)

In a 3 qt. saucepan, pour about 1 cup of tap water. Place a medium to large bowl on top of that to create a double boiler:



Place on stove and turn heat to low.

In your double boiler, put chunk of butter and chop a few times so it melts faster. While butter is melting, adjust oven rack to center position, preheat oven to 275 degrees and assemble ingredients.

Once butter is fully melted, remove the top bowl from the saucepan (away from the hot water), place on counter and add molasses, vanilla, liquid splenda (if using), cold water and stir with a silicon scraper. Mixture should be warm but not hot. Add eggs, whisk briefly.

In a separate bowl, combine salt, erythritol, polyd, ace k and granular splenda (if using) and mix thoroughly.

Return egg mixture to simmering saucepan. While whisking vigorously with one hand, very slowly pour the dry mix with the other. Once the dry has been incorporated into the wet, give it a good thorough wisking to break up lumps as much as possible.

While maintaining a slow simmer with low heat, stir the mixture with a silicon scraper constantly until it turns clear and becomes hot (about 160 degrees) scraping the bottom of the bowl with every pass. Press any lumps of polyd/E into the bottom of the bowl to break up/dissolve. Keep it moving or you'll scramble the eggs. Once 160 degrees is reached (it takes a few minutes of stirring) remove from the heat; stir in the pecans and pour the mixture into pie shell

Bake until center feels set yet soft, like gelatin, when gently pressed, about 30-40 minutes. Transfer pie to rack; let cool completely, at least 4 hours. Refrigerate.

Notes

My first generation pecan pie utilized a blender to assimilate the polyd. No need for this, as the double boiler technique dissolves any clumps.

Black Strap Molasses and Color

This pie is a tad on the dark side. I've tried it using less bs molasses and it just didn't taste right. It definitely needs the full teaspoon and a half. I'm looking for a decent caramel flavoring. Once I find that, I'll decrease the bs molasses a bit, and lighten the color (as well as decrease the sugar carbs).

Double boiler water quantity

Since sauce pans/bowls vary, you may want less or more water than a cup. Basically, you want enough water so that it doesn't boil away, but not so much that water it's touching the bottom of the bowl.

Double boiler heat setting

I've specified low here because the lower the temp the less likely the eggs will scramble/the more control you have. As you become more proficient with using a double boiler, you can increase the heat and get the job done faster. Maintaining the water at a light simmer is good. If the water gets too hot, take the bowl off the saucepan and lower the heat. Double boilers are all about gentle heat. The first few times you use one, it's better to be too gentle (and take longer) then crank up the heat and rush things. Stirred egg custards don't like to be rushed. I crank up the heat, but then I've been making these sort of things for a long time.

Frozen Pecans

I specify frozen pecans because that's how I store them. I find freezing them keeps them fresh for quite a bit longer. I also noticed that the act of baking the pie toasts them, so I don't go overboard with pre-toasting. If I have time one day, I might pre-toast just to see the difference, if any. If you use room temp pecans, the filling will start out slightly warmer and thus need less baking time.

Overcooking pecan pie

I don't think I've ever NOT overcooked a pecan pie. It's really easy to do. Fortunately an overcooked pecan pie is still great, it's just a little lumpier than normal. Also, the butter has a tendency to ooze out, but then again, I'm not one to complain about oozing butter . This last pie that I baked, I knew when to take it out, but purposely overcooked it to see the effect polyd had on overcooking. It reacted the same way a normal pecan pie does. A pecan pie is basically a custard. Custards like slow and low cooking (see Alton Brown). That's the reason for the 275 degree oven temp. Although a set cooking time is nice, you'll really want to go by visual cues with your pie. It will puff up slightly, and like I said in the directions, it will feel like a loose gelatin. Once you reach that point, out it comes.

This makes a killer pie. Could it be better? Maybe a little. I might tweak it ever so slightly here and there. All in all, though, I'm proud of this.
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Old 11-08-2005, 11:15 PM   #2
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Thank you so much, Scott. I am going to try it very soon. It seems easy and sounds like it will taste great. Like you, I'm not sure of the crust. I may try one with carbquik or carbalose - maybe one of each and see which one is best!
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Old 11-09-2005, 10:46 AM   #3
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Thank you Scott...this is what I have been waiting for....now my Thanksgiving dinner is complete...
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Old 11-09-2005, 11:03 AM   #4
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Do you happen to have any nutritional information on this? I personally could just eat the filling as that is the best part of pecan pie to me .
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Old 11-09-2005, 12:48 PM   #5
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Scott, can you use chopped pecans for this pie? Do all the pecans go to the top while baking? I assume they don't stay mixed in the filling.
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Old 11-09-2005, 08:21 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunset
Do you happen to have any nutritional information on this? I personally could just eat the filling as that is the best part of pecan pie to me .
Although I'm quite the geek when it comes to cooking, I just can't justify spending that much time counting calories/carbs, sorry. I generally try to stick with ingredients that have either no carbs or a neglible number of them (pecans, eggs, polyd, erythritol, liquid splenda, ace k, butter) and strive to keep carby ingredients to a mininum. The only carby ingredient in this, bs molasses, is about 5.5 carbs for 1.5 t. As I mentioned before, 1.5 t. is the barest minimum I could get away with and still keep the taste of the pie 'true.' At some point I'd like to trim this quantity a bit with some form of caramel flavoring. Also, after tasting a drop of bs molasses, I couldn't help notice that it possessed some very recognizable flavor notes. Licorice is one. A slight vinegar note is another (molasses contains a little bit of naturally occuring vinegar). Those ingredients might make it into my faux molasses blend. Maybe. I'll have to ponder it a bit

Btw, I ate half the pie last night and half tonight. It was just TOO GOOD!
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Old 11-09-2005, 08:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lgpars
Scott, can you use chopped pecans for this pie? Do all the pecans go to the top while baking? I assume they don't stay mixed in the filling.

Linda, chopped pecans will work, but only under one condition- they must be very fresh. There are a LOT of marginally fresh pecans out there. Throw a rock in your average supermarket and it'll be hard to miss them. Remember, we're talking pecan pie here. The pecans should be the star of the event. I've been getting phenomenally fresh pecan halves at Whole Foods at astoundingly competitive prices. These pecan halves are 50 times fresher than the ones at Trader Joes, and about a dollar less. I'm sure some buyer must have screwed up the price somewhere because Whole Foods just about never undersells TJs.

And yes, the pecan halves float to the top while baking, just like a real pecan pie.
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Old 11-09-2005, 11:37 PM   #8
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Scott, according to Netrition, 1 SweetOne packet equals the sweetening of 2 tsp of sugar. Your recipe calls for 1/16 tsp of SweetOne. Is that less than 1 packet? And is that enough sweetening along with the ˝C E and the ˝C equivalent liquid Splenda for the pie? Thanks, Judy

Last edited by judytab; 11-09-2005 at 11:39 PM..
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Old 11-10-2005, 07:17 AM   #9
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Judy, that's a good question. I began my pie experiments by making them in smaller batches (1/3 size) in custard cups. Now that I think about it, I probably forgot to scale up the Ace K when I went to a full size pie. I'll probably tweak the sweeteners in this at some point, but my recommendation to anyone making this for the first time would be to follow the formula listed as is.

I usually formulate with a greater ratio of ace k (about 1 packet to 1 cup total sweetening equivalent), but my scaling error didn't seem to impact the quality of sweetness in this pie. Pecan pie is a traditionally sweet pie, so any potential sweetener aftertaste would be very noticeable. Perhaps there's some synergy between the sweeteners and the molasses, I'm not sure. Whatever the reason, the present quality of sweetness is superb.

A packet of ace k contains 2 t. of sweetening equivalent, but only about 5/16 t. of volume. If you haven't gotten your hands on dash (1/8 t.), pinch (1/16 t.) and smidgeon (1/32 t.) measuring spoons, I highly recommend it. The last time I looked, Walmart was carrying them. If you want to make this but don't have the measuring spoons, I recommend pouring out a packet of sweet one ace k onto wax paper and eyeballing about a fifth.
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Old 11-20-2005, 03:11 PM   #10
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Scott I made this today as written. Thank you for such detailed instructions especially for my first time making something with polyd. I will have to try a different crust next time as mine seems really crumbly. I also had to bake longer than stated as my pie was still very liquid in the center after 40 minutes. But it looks beautiful and I am sure it tastes wonderful. I am waiting til Thanksgiving day, I am going to freeze it until then. Thanks again
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Old 11-20-2005, 05:31 PM   #11
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Shadowzip, I'm curious, how long did your pie take to set up?

If you can wait until thanksgiving without eating this pie, I'm impressed, really impressed
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Old 11-20-2005, 07:48 PM   #12
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Scott I left it in the oven another 10 minutes and then turned the heat to 350 for about 7 minutes and then it looked really good and was set in the center but not too dark, as pecan pies sometimes get.

Prepare to be impressed cause it went into the freezer untouched. I was trying to get some things for me, for Thanksgiving, made ahead of time as I will be spending Wednesday making my family's favorite carb filled dishes I have some mashed cauliflower made already and some chipotle sweet potatoes. Making low carb cranberries tomorrow. I'll let you know how the pie was after freezing.
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Old 11-22-2005, 03:09 PM   #13
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There's nothing I hate worse than standing over a double boiler painstakingly stirring eggs so they don't lump up -- but there's nothing I love better than pecan pie! Thanks for a wonderful recipe, Scott!!! I licked the leftover batter out of the bowl and it tasted absolutely fabulous. I always liked a dark pecan pie, anyway -- I used to use all dark Karo syrup. Unfortunately, I'm not going to be home for Thanksgiving, so I'll have to wait till I get home on Friday to try the pie. But it looks just like real pecan pie. Thanks again to a fabulous cook!
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Old 11-22-2005, 03:19 PM   #14
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My quick count of the carbs in this recipe is about 46 (not including the pie shell and using liquid Splenda). So eight servings would be about 5.7 per serving.
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Old 12-18-2005, 10:07 PM   #15
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Scott - I finally made the pecan pie and it is delicious! I never did get to do it for Thanksgiving so my experimental one was made yesterday. I followed your recipe to a tee - pretty much. The only change I made was to add 1 tbs SF praline syrup to the water and used a whole pkt of Sweet One. I measured ˝ of a 1/8 tsp measure at first and when I tasted it, it seemed not quite sweet enough so I dumped the rest of the pkt in. It could be a tad less sweet but then it is pecan pie! The only problem was that it took so long to get to the right temp. I did raise the heat a little at the end to hurry it along. I think now that I know what it should look like and how hot it should be, I will try heating it at a higer temp next time and just watch it. I am going to make another one for Christmas Day. I can't believe I can really have pecan pie again.

Scott, thank you so much for developing this recipe!
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Old 12-22-2005, 11:49 AM   #16
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Did you try this making the polyd into a syrup to get the consistency of karo? How is the consistency of the pie compared to standard pecan pie? Did you have any problems with the polyd clumping (another benefit I thought of using a syrup)? I'm going to try it as soon as my polyd comes in (it will be after Christmas though).
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Old 12-22-2005, 02:31 PM   #17
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jackieba - I Just followed Scott's recipe at the top of the thread. Follow it exactly as written. I think Scott first tried it with his polyd syrup and it sank. When you cook it all in the double boiler, it makes a kind of syrup that you add the pecans to and pour into the pie shell. It looked and tasted just like the usual pecan pies I made with corn syrup - from what I can remember. I had to bake it a little longer than in Scott's recipe - about 10 min or so. Use his recipe and read all of the other posts in this thread, including mine and you will be prepared to make it. Once you do it, it is really very easy. I'm going to make another one for Christmas day and try to fool my son. He loves pecan pie and is wary of my SF desserts and won't try it if he knows it's SF!

There were a few small clumps when I first whisked everything together, but as it heats up and you stir it, they dissolve. I mashed some stubborn ones against the double boiler pan as I was stirring it and it was all smooth at the end of the cooking. I was kind of afraid of using PolyD at first, especially because of the clumping issue, but the more I use it, the more I realize it's not that difficult.
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Old 12-22-2005, 04:19 PM   #18
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I made this yesterday and it did take a long time to reach 160 degrees. Even at that temperature, my mixture was still brown so not sure what I did wrong. Also not sure how long I baked it because I didn't hear the buzzer but when I checked, the timer had already gone off. Despite those two things, the pie was terrific. Everyone loved it and said no one would know it contained no sugar if I didn't tell them. I've committed to making another one over Christmas so the guys will have it when they get home from their respective holidays (my son's housemates).

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Old 12-22-2005, 07:44 PM   #19
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i made this also , its a beautiful pie- i wonder if i could add bourbon, or if ill mess it up? does anyone know the shelf life?
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Old 12-22-2005, 08:27 PM   #20
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I made mine on Sat and we finished it on Wed and it was still good, keeping it in the refrigerater. Also, I would think you could freeze it or some of it for later [haven't tried that myself, though]. I also would think that you could add bourbon, if you factor in the amt of liquid along with the water so it would be the same. I did that when adding 1 T of praline Davinci and may add more of it in the next one. Also, consider that some of the alcohol may evaporate during the cooking process before baking so the flavor might not be as strong. But that would be a plus for me
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Old 12-23-2005, 10:31 AM   #21
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I always add whiskey to my pecan pie (about 1/3 cup)--the alcohol cooks out but we like the flavor it adds so I'll definitely be doing that when I try the recipe. I never refrigerated pecan pie before and it kept just fine (it would normally be eaten within 4-5 days).
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Old 12-23-2005, 03:09 PM   #22
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If you have had good luck not refrigerating it before, then I suppose it would be OK for this one also - maybe the whiskey preserves it! I just figure since it is made with eggs and is like a custard, it would be better to refrigerate it. But this one tastes really good cold!
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Old 12-23-2005, 04:45 PM   #23
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the middle of mine is more thick . i can pick it up- the wedge and its almost chewy, is everyone else like thaT? its good though, just didnt know if i did it right. im adicted
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Old 12-26-2005, 07:01 PM   #24
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we added a tablespoon of bourbon, and yes, its more like the pie i use to make, it seems a little wetter or mushier and is actually morehardcrack sweeter like reg pecan pie. didnt do anything really any different.very awesome!!!!
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Old 01-04-2006, 05:02 PM   #25
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Wonderful pie. One question about mine though--it turned out kinda dry--more like brownie pie. I know I overcooked it so maybe that's the problem. Just wanted to see what the final product should be like??. I also wondered if maybe I possibly got too much polyd though I spooned it in and leveled it like I do flour. It was really thick when it went into the oven. The taste is wonderful though. My previous attempts at LC pecan pie were disasters. Thanks for the recipe.
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Old 01-04-2006, 06:42 PM   #26
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The way mine came out, I wouldn't call it dry, but the texture was somewhat thicker than reg pecan pie. but I like it that way and the taste is right on. In fact, my DD [who didn't know it was SF] heated hers in the microwave before adding ice cream and commented that it didn't liquefy as much as usual when heated - which she thought was a good thing!
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Old 07-07-2006, 06:25 AM   #27
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bump for tater!
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Old 07-07-2006, 09:21 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by griffin
bump for tater!

Thanks Griffin,

I looked it over and I think I'd change one thing, the amount of E used. I never use that much E in any recipe I make, at most I've used 1/4 cup and that was in a bread type recipe that hides the cooling effect. 1/2 cup E I'd think would have too much of a cooling effect in my mouth. I'll play around with a different mix of sugar subs when I make it. But thanks for finding it for me it looks interesting
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Old 07-07-2006, 10:10 AM   #29
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Tater, erythritol only has a cooling effect when it isn't dissolved. As long as it's in a setting where it stays dissolved, erythritol has zero cooling effect. Polyd is one of those ingredients that is especially powerful at keeping erythritol dissolved.

This pie, as made, has zero cooling effect. You have my word.

Now, after making this pie a few times and reading the posts in this thread, I think that it might be ever so slightly on the chewy side. The next time I might this I'll probably decrease the erythritol/polyd and increase the splenda.

Here is the revised recipe:

Polyd Pecan Pie

One 9" lightly pre-baked pie shell

6 tablespoons lightly salted butter

1 1/2 t. blackstrap molasses
2 t. vanilla extract
1/2 C. + 1 T. splenda equivalent (I use 13 drops)
5 T. cold water

3 large eggs

1/4 t. salt
1/2 C. minus 2 T. erythritol
1 C. minus 2 T. polyd (lightly dispensed)
1/16 t. Sweet One Ace K

2 cups frozen pecan halves (8 ounces)

In a 3 qt. saucepan, pour about 1 cup of tap water. Place a medium to large bowl on top of that to create a double boiler:



Place on stove and turn heat to low.

In your double boiler, put chunk of butter and chop a few times so it melts faster. While butter is melting, adjust oven rack to center position, preheat oven to 275 degrees and assemble ingredients.

Once butter is fully melted, remove the top bowl from the saucepan (away from the hot water), place on counter and add molasses, vanilla, liquid splenda (if using), cold water and stir with a silicon scraper. Mixture should be warm but not hot. Add eggs, whisk briefly.

In a separate bowl, combine salt, erythritol, polyd, ace k and granular splenda (if using) and mix thoroughly.

Return egg mixture to simmering saucepan. While whisking vigorously with one hand, very slowly pour the dry mix with the other. Once the dry has been incorporated into the wet, give it a good thorough wisking to break up lumps as much as possible.

While maintaining a slow simmer with low heat, stir the mixture with a silicon scraper constantly until it turns clear and becomes hot (about 160 degrees) scraping the bottom of the bowl with every pass. Press any lumps of polyd/E into the bottom of the bowl to break up/dissolve. Keep it moving or you'll scramble the eggs. Once 160 degrees is reached (it takes a few minutes of stirring) remove from the heat; stir in the pecans and pour the mixture into pie shell

Bake until center feels set yet soft, like gelatin, when gently pressed, about 30-40 minutes. Transfer pie to rack; let cool completely, at least 4 hours. Refrigerate.

Notes

My first generation pecan pie utilized a blender to assimilate the polyd. No need for this, as the double boiler technique dissolves any clumps.

Black Strap Molasses and Color

This pie is a tad on the dark side. I've tried it using less bs molasses and it just didn't taste right. It definitely needs the full teaspoon and a half. I'm looking for a decent caramel flavoring. Once I find that, I'll decrease the bs molasses a bit, and lighten the color (as well as decrease the sugar carbs).

Double boiler water quantity

Since sauce pans/bowls vary, you may want less or more water than a cup. Basically, you want enough water so that it doesn't boil away, but not so much that water it's touching the bottom of the bowl.

Double boiler heat setting

I've specified low here because the lower the temp the less likely the eggs will scramble/the more control you have. As you become more proficient with using a double boiler, you can increase the heat and get the job done faster. Maintaining the water at a light simmer is good. If the water gets too hot, take the bowl off the saucepan and lower the heat. Double boilers are all about gentle heat. The first few times you use one, it's better to be too gentle (and take longer) then crank up the heat and rush things. Stirred egg custards don't like to be rushed. I crank up the heat, but then I've been making these sort of things for a long time.

Frozen Pecans

I specify frozen pecans because that's how I store them. I find freezing them keeps them fresh for quite a bit longer. I also noticed that the act of baking the pie toasts them, so I don't go overboard with pre-toasting. If I have time one day, I might pre-toast just to see the difference, if any. If you use room temp pecans, the filling will start out slightly warmer and thus need less baking time.

Overcooking pecan pie

I don't think I've ever NOT overcooked a pecan pie. It's really easy to do. Fortunately an overcooked pecan pie is still great, it's just a little lumpier than normal. Also, the butter has a tendency to ooze out, but then again, I'm not one to complain about oozing butter . This last pie that I baked, I knew when to take it out, but purposely overcooked it to see the effect polyd had on overcooking. It reacted the same way a normal pecan pie does. A pecan pie is basically a custard. Custards like slow and low cooking (see Alton Brown). That's the reason for the 275 degree oven temp. Although a set cooking time is nice, you'll really want to go by visual cues with your pie. It will puff up slightly, and like I said in the directions, it will feel like a loose gelatin. Once you reach that point, out it comes.

Last edited by scott123; 07-07-2006 at 10:12 AM..
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Old 07-08-2006, 08:07 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scott123
Tater, erythritol only has a cooling effect when it isn't dissolved. As long as it's in a setting where it stays dissolved, erythritol has zero cooling effect.

Sorry Scott, but that not has been my experience with it, dissolved or not it still had that cooling effect almost to the point of burning my tongue. I have made many things with it, sweet sauces and such and they were completely dissolved and way too strong imo. I try to never use anything more then 1/4-1/3 cup because Of my experiences with it. Also on the PolyD, I now have used it enough times to know not to use more than 1/2 a cup at most in most things too. IMO a mix of E,splenda and sweet one works best as a combo in most things I make.



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Last edited by Tater Head; 07-08-2006 at 08:19 AM..
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