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Old 02-14-2005, 01:34 PM   #1
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A new challenge for Scott -- Cadbury creme egg

Scott,

I found this recipe for chocolate creme eggs:

Ingredients for Filling (20 half eggs)
16oz (455g) confectioners (icing) sugar
1oz (30g) gelatine
8tbs water
3 large eggwhites

Method
1. Warm the icing sugar. Dissolve the gelatine in the water.

2. Whisk the eggs whites until they form stiff peaks, then gradually beat in the warmed icing sugar. Mix until the icing sugar mixture is cold.

3. Mix in the dissolved gelatine then put the mixture into a piping bag and pipe it into the half chocolate egg shells. Almost fill the shells and leave to set.

4. Pipe melted chocolate over the filling to completely cover it, then use a palatte knife to smooth the chocolate. They should look like perfect little half chocolate eggs with no sign of the filling when you have finished. Leave to set, then remove from moulds.

5. Put two halves together to make complete eggs, then wrap them in coloured silver paper or foil.

----------------------
Any ideas on how to convert this to LC?
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Old 02-14-2005, 01:37 PM   #2
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I think I found a better recipe:

Here's a little Easter present for you. It's a clone version of the first soft fondant-filled egg candy to hit the market, many Easters ago. Now, because of the success of these chocolates with the orange yolk-colored center, other candy companies have come out with their own milk chocolate eggs. Some are filled with Snickers or Milky Way centers, while others contain peanut butter, coconut, caramel or the same type of fondant center as the original...right down to the colors. These eggs are sold only once a year, for the Easter holiday. And, in that same spirit, this recipe will only be up for a week; so get it while you can or you'll have to wait until next year. Happy Easter, everyone!

1/2 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 cups powdered sugar
4 drops yellow food coloring
2 drops red food coloring
1 12-ounce bags milk chocolate chips
2 tablespoons vegetable shortening

1. Combine the corn syrup, butter, vanilla, and salt in a large bowl. Beat well with an electric mixer until smooth.
2. Add powdered sugar, one cup at a time, mixing by hand after each addition. Mix well until creamy.
3. Remove about 1/3 of the mixture and place it into a small bowl. Add the yellow and red food coloring and stir well to combine.
4. Cover both mixtures and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or until firm.
5. When mixtures are firm, roll a small, marble-size ball from the orange filling, and wrap around it a portion of the white filling that is roughly twice the size. Form this filling into the shape of an egg and place it onto a cookie sheet that has been brushed with a light coating of shortening. Repeat for the remaining filling ingredients, then refrigerate these centers for 3-4 hours or until firm.
6. Combine the milk chocolate chips with the shortening in a glass or ceramic bowl. Microwave chocolate on high speed for 1 minute, then stir and microwave again for 1 more minute, and stir.
7. Use a fork to dip each center into the chocolate, tap the fork on the side of the bowl, then place each candy onto wax paper. Chill.
8. After 1-2 hours of chilling, dip each candy once more and chill for several hours, or until completely firm. Makes 2 dozen candy eggs.
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Old 02-14-2005, 03:57 PM   #3
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Oh boy, LC cadbury eggs - my DH would be in heaven if I could duplicate those!

I'll be watching this thread with great interest........

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Old 02-15-2005, 03:02 AM   #4
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Karolina, the defining ingredient of a fondant is the powdered sugar. Polyd can be powdered in a blender, but once it hits moisture, it immediately changes to a liquid form, unlike real powdered sugar that stays powdered/creates a creamy texture.

In other words, Polyd will not work as a sub for powdered sugar. The only alternative is SAs powdered in a blender. Erythritol should work, although the cooling effect might be pretty staggering. Also, the cost will be through the roof. For those sensitive to SAs, though, that's the only option. With that in mind, here goes:

2/3 cup polyd
1/4 cup water
Rnd. 1/4 t. salt
2 drops concentrated liquid splenda (1 T. + 1 t. splenda equivalent)
3/16 t. sweetening equivalent ace k or stevia (1/32 t. sweet one)

1/4 cup butter, softened
1 1/16 t. vanilla

3 cups powdered erythritol (see recipe below)

4 drops yellow food coloring
2 drops red food coloring
12-ounce sf milk chocolate broken into small pieces (semi sweet chips are too dark)
2 tablespoons butter

Erythritol Powdered Sugar

1 2/3 C. erythritol
1/2 t. xanthan gum

Blend until completely powdered. Makes 3 Cups.


1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a saucepan and heat until melted. Place in the fridge (or outside) to cool quickly. Allow to cool thoroughly.
2. Once syrup is room temp, combine with butter and vanilla in a large bowl. Beat well with an electric mixer until smooth.
3. Add powdered E, one cup at a time, mixing by hand after each addition. Mix well until creamy.
4. Remove about 1/3 of the mixture and place it into a small bowl. Add the yellow and red food coloring and stir well to combine.
5. Cover both mixtures and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or until firm.
6. When mixtures are firm, roll a small, marble-size ball from the orange filling, and wrap around it a portion of the white filling that is roughly twice the size. Form this filling into the shape of an egg and place it onto a cookie sheet that has been brushed with a light coating of butter. Repeat for the remaining filling ingredients, then refrigerate these centers for 3-4 hours or until firm.
7. Combine the milk chocolate with the butter in a glass or ceramic bowl. Microwave chocolate on high speed for 10 seconds, then gently stir and microwave again for 10 seconds more. Continue microwaving for 10 sec./stirring until chocolate/butter is melted.
8. Use a fork to dip each center into the chocolate, tap the fork on the side of the bowl, then place each candy onto wax paper. Chill.
9. After 1-2 hours of chilling, dip each candy once more and chill for several hours, or until completely firm. Makes 2 dozen candy eggs.

Notes:

It's absolutely essential that the syrup be in the room temp realm (60-100) before adding the E. If it's too hot the E will dissolve (bad) or if it's too cold you won't be able to stir the final product.

Because shortening has no water content, melted chocolate and shortening will not seize. By subbing butter for shortening changes the whole playing field, hence the 10 second microwaving intervals. You might want to do the chocolate in a double boiler. Whichever method you choose, don't heat the chocolate too quickly or stir it too vigorously.

Sf milk chocolate is essential to recreate a cadbury type of egg. There's not a lot of erythritol milk chocolate available that is actually milky. I'd say Zcarb is one of the best. Minicarb chips are just too dark.

If the cooling effect from the E is really bad, you might try kneading a little mint flavoring into the fondant mixture and make these mint flavored chocolate eggs. Or if you like peppermint patties, a mint flavored version will work for those as well. Be careful how much mint you use, though. A little goes a long way.

Making powdered sugar isn't as easy as it sounds. I've tried powdered maltitol and it ended up sticking to the walls of the blender and coming out quite uneven. Hopefully there's someone here with more experience that can help. For this recipe to work, the powdered erythritol has to be absolutely flawless.

Polyd is little bit yellower than corn syrup, so the resulting egg white will not be perfectly white, but it should be close.

Because of the amount of erythritol involved, I'd make a half recipe the first time. No matter how small the splenda/ace k amounts get, don't omit them - they're essential for helping to compensate for the cooling effect of the E.

Last edited by scott123; 02-15-2005 at 03:05 AM..
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Old 02-15-2005, 05:42 AM   #5
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Scott -- I found some fondant recipes that don't call for powdered sugar. Would that work better?

Basic Fondant

An excellent all-purpose cream center, creamy off-white in color. Rich and smooth. The recipe can be used as a base which you can add other ingredients to change the flavor.

Yield

125 centers


Ingredients

5 cups granulated sugar
1 cup whole milk
1 cup heavy cream
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 teaspoon orange, vanilla, or almond flavoring (optional)
1 cup nuts, chopped (optional)
dipping chocolate


Directions

Place a 9" x 13" ungreased baking pan in the refrigerator to cool (do not freeze). Use cautionary measures when working with hot syrup.

In a heavy saucepan (4 quart), combine sugar, milk, cream, butter, and cream of tartar. Stir until sugar is moistened. Place over high heat. Bring to a boil, then gradually lower candy thermometer into boiling syrup. Cook without stirring, lowering the heat slightly as mixture thickens. Cook until syrup reaches 236°F. Remove from heat and pour into cooled baking pan without stirring or scraping. Cool until syrup is lukewarm. Work with a spatula until fondant creams, then knead with hands until it is very smooth, adding flavoring or nuts, if desired. Form into a ball and let rest until it is completely cool. Form into 3/4 inch balls and dip in chocolate.


Variations

Vanilla French Creams: Work 2 cups basic fondant until it becomes smooth. Add 1 teaspoon clear vanilla extract and work until it becomes well blended. Place on waxed paper and let stand for a few minutes. Form into 3/4 inch balls and dip in chocolate, then roll in chopped nuts.

Chocolate French Creams: Melt 1 ounce dark chocolate coatings (candy melts). Work 2 cups basic fondant until it becomes smooth, add melted chocolate to fondant. Work until well blended. Form into 3/4 inch balls and dip into chocolate, then roll in chocolate sprinkles.

Peppermint Patties: Work 2 cups basic fondant until softened. Add 1/4 teaspoon oil of peppermint and a few drops of green food coloring. Form into 1 inch balls and flatten each into patties. Dip in melted semisweet chocolate.

Orange Pecan Creams: Work 2 cups of basic fondant until softened. Add 3/4 teaspoon oil of orange, a few drops of orange food coloring, and 1/2 cup finely chopped nuts. Blend all together. Form into 3/4 inch balls and dip in chocolate.

Cream Fondant

This basic cream fondant recipe can be used to make a variety of flavored centers for dipped chocolates.

Yield

100 centers


Ingredients

1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup light corn syrup
4 cups granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup marshmallow creme (optional)
flavorings (optional)
nuts (optional)


Directions

Place a 9" x 13" ungreased baking pan in the refrigerator to cool (do not freeze). Use cautionary measures when working with hot syrup.

In a heavy saucepan (4 quart), combine cream, milk, corn syrup, sugar and salt. Place over medium heat and stir occasionally with a wooden spoon until mixture comes to a boil. If any sugar crystals are present, wash down sides of pan with a wet pastry brush to remove.

Attach a candy thermometer to saucepan. Cook syrup to 238°F (115°C) or soft-ball stage. Remove from heat and pour into baking pan without stirring or scraping. Without excess movement, place in refrigerator or cool area.

When bottom of pan has cooled (no longer warm), begin slowly stirring fondant with a wooden spoon. After 15 minutes of stirring add marshmallow creme if desired. Add flavoring and/or nuts if desired. Stir fondant until it sets up becoming very stiff and no longer glossy.

If the fondant is too stiff to handle, break off a small piece and knead it with your hands to soften. You can also wrap the fondant in plastic wrap and cover it with a warm damp towel for 15 minutes to soften. If either method doesn't soften the fondant, then it is overcooked and will need to be recooked.

If you have stirred to fondant for more than 1 hour and it hasn't set up, try letting it rest for a few minutes without stirring. This will sometime cause the fondant to begin the desired crystallization process. If resting the fondant doesn't work, it may be undercooked. It will need to be recooked.

Water Fondant

This basic water fondant recipe can be used to make a variety of flavored centers for mints or fruit centers.

Yield

100 centers


Ingredients

1 1/3 cups water
1/3 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup butter
4 cups granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup marshmallow creme (optional)
flavoring
food coloring


Directions

Place a 9" x 13" ungreased baking pan in the refrigerator to cool (do not freeze). Use cautionary measures when working with hot syrup.

In a heavy saucepan (4 quart), combine water, corn syrup, butter, sugar, cream of tartar and salt. Place over high heat and stir occasionally with a wooden spoon until mixture comes to a boil. If any sugar crystals are present, wash down sides of pan with a wet pastry brush to remove. The fondant will be grainy if any sugar remains undissolved.

Attach a candy thermometer to saucepan. Cook syrup without stirring to 240°F (115°C) or soft-ball stage. Remove from heat and pour into baking pan without stirring or scraping. Without excess movement, place in refrigerator or cool area.

When bottom of pan has cooled (no longer warm), begin slowly stirring fondant with a wooden spoon. Add marshmallow creme if desired. Add flavoring and color. Stir fondant until it sets up and loses the shine and resembles thick frosting. It generally takes 30 to 40 minutes of stirring to set up, but can set up in as little as 15 minutes.

If the fondant hardens, wrap the fondant in plastic wrap and cover it with a warm damp towel for 15 minutes to soften. If this method doesn't soften the fondant, then it is overcooked and will need to be recooked.

If you have stirred to fondant for more than 1 hour and it hasn't set up, try letting it rest for a few minutes without stirring. This will sometime cause the fondant to begin the desired crystallization process. After resting, if the fondant doesn't work, it may be undercooked. It will need to be recooked.
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Old 02-15-2005, 06:51 AM   #6
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Karolina, polyd won't crystallize either The recipes you've posted are basically just loose fudges. We've been hitting the same brick wall regarding PDX crystallization with fudge too. Heated/cooled/then stirred fudge/fondant is basically a different way of making powdered sugar - instead of breaking up the sugar by mechanical means, very tiny sugar crystals are cultivated.

So... we're still stuck with erythritol.

Btw, erythritol will definitely crystallize for cooked fudge/fondant, but we haven't figured out the temp yet. A much safer bet would be to powder the E like the recipe above.

It won't have the slightly grainy mouthfeel that defines fondant, but how about making a thicker caramel sauce and covering that will chocolate? You can also make it with more cream and/or low carb milk to make it creamier.

How about chocolate covered marshmallows for Easter? Or maybe a slightly softer marshmallow cream covered with chocolate. The next person to tackle the PDX marshmallow should emerge victorious.
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Old 02-15-2005, 02:56 PM   #7
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Caramel sauce covered in chocolate sounds good (not sure if my tummy would agree though ). BTW, do you think Pami's chocolate peanut butter fudge Chocolate peanut butter fudge thread would work as a center for easter eggs or would it just create one huge mess?
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Old 02-15-2005, 10:46 PM   #8
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Yes, that was going to be my next suggestion. Nut butter is an alternative method for creating that slightly grainy crumbliness that you get from sugar crystal/powdered sugar.

You might want to add a little more cream, in the hopes some gooeyness might be achieved. I don't have a lot of experience with this, but I might double the cream, make them very gooey, freeze the result and form the balls frozen/dip them in the chocolate frozen. That way at fridge temp the exterior will be hard and the interior gooey. That might be an approach I'd take.

Or I might make them only slightly gooeyer - just firm enough to work with them chilled, cover them with chocolate and then cover them with crushed nuts so they could be served at room temp.
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Old 03-15-2005, 04:18 PM   #9
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Basic White Fondant

Here is my recipe for
Basic White Fondant
(used this in my candy making phase, some 36 years ago)
3 c sifted granulated sugar
1 c hot water
1 T corn syrup or 1/8 t cream of tartar
In a 2 qt sauce pan, combine ingredients. Place over low heat and stir continuously only until boiling point is reached. Now increase heat and cook rapidly without stirring until thermometer reaches 238º F during cold dry weather for mint patties and 242º F for bonbon coating. Pour out onto slab and cool to about 110º. Now cream till white and very thick. Now knead until creamy. Tiny lumps will soften during ripening stage. Fondant should now be refrigerated and aged for at least 24 hours but may be made 2 weeks before needed. This makes about 1 1/2# fondant.
I have more info on different centers, mostly using this basic recipe.

I still don't understand what polyd does or doesn't do. So, don't know if that would work at all in this recipe. I don't use much erythritol. Any ideas if some xylitol and some polyd would work? I sure hate to waste lots of ingredients.
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Old 03-15-2005, 08:38 PM   #10
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whats a fondant? is that the weddin cake stuff?


looks like a recipe scott could handle...
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Old 03-16-2005, 10:21 AM   #11
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Have you ever eaten chocolate covered cherries? The stuff around the cherries is fondant. Really good fondant becomes a 'syrup' enclosed in chocolate enclosing a cherry.
Really good creamy mints are also made with fondant. The powdered sugar ones are not nearly as good.
Petit fuors usually have a fondant coating on them as well.... softened to a pouring consistency and poured over the layered cake pieces.
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Old 03-16-2005, 12:30 PM   #12
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Bette, xylitol will probably work for fondant, with maybe a little bit of polyd for the liquid 'phase.' I don't know the temperature that xylitol recrystallizes, so rather than melt it/enourage crystallization, I'd do what I recommended with the erythritol - blend it to a powder. The size of a recrystallized sugar alcohol granule in fudge/fondant is almost the same as a powdered granule. In order to prevent the xylitol from melting, the powder needs to be combined with a room temp liquid. I'd make a thin polyd syrup - maybe 2 parts polyd to 1 part water, then I'd add powdered xylitol to that until it thickened/got creamy. The cooling effect will be massive, but the texture should be right.

I would try something like:

1 T. water or cream
2 T. polyd

Microwave until polyd is melted. Allow to thoroughly cool.

Blend 1/4 C. xylitol in a blender

Add 1 T. at a time until desired consistency is reached.

Because xylitol is as sweet if not sweeter than sugar and polyd is contributing a slight amount of sweetness, this is definitely going to be on the sweet side.
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Old 07-10-2013, 10:20 PM   #13
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i know this is an old thread, but theres been a release of new products since this was created. Has this being attempted while using a mimic confectionery sugar such as LC foods, as i know it creates a dough like consistency when a bit of water, coconut oil, or cocoa butter is added, so it provides some bulk, what about polyD, lcfoods confectionery sugar, and swerve confectionery sugar and konjac flour with some flavouring / essence?
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