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Old 01-02-2005, 06:31 PM   #1
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Chinese brown sauce help

Do you know what this is called? It has NO sugar, corn starch or MSG. It was rather salty and a little thick, but not real thick. *sigh* They just call it brown sauce lol. I need carb counts!! Anyone have a clue?

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Old 01-02-2005, 07:35 PM   #2
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Brown sauce (at Chinese restaurants) is called just that: Brown Sauce. Are you absolutely sure about it having no sugar? In all my travels I have never come across a brown sauce that didn't have some form of sweetener (honey, brown sugar, molasses, etc.). It's traditionally thickened with corn starch, so that kicks up the carbs as well.

I don't have any exact numbers for you as recipes vary, but if I had to make a wild guess, I'd say 15-20 net carbs per cup.
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Old 01-02-2005, 07:42 PM   #3
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Hi Scott. I called the restaurnat and asked again just to be sure. She said nothing sweet at all. No cornstarch. I still counted it as 8 carbs, just guessing. I cnat imagine what they would use to thicken it or give it the flavor. I wont be doing that again. thanks for the reply.
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Old 01-02-2005, 08:07 PM   #4
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I do a lot of Chinese cooking, and I've never seen a recipe with a sauce that didn't include cornstarch, unless the meat was marinated in a soy/sherry mixture that had cornstarch. For the sweetness, if they don't add sugar directly to their brown sauce, they are probably using a little oyster sauce or hoisin sauce in it, both of which contain sugar. If you're interested in making Chinese at home, let me know and I'll post some good recipes I've converted.
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Old 01-02-2005, 08:16 PM   #5
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From another website:

Chinese Brown Sauce
I'm really busy right now, so I'm just swooping in to plop down a "secret" recipe for Chinese brown sauce. Believe it or not, this is authentic--there's a pretty good chance that your average Chinese restaurant will use it. I don't really have amounts, so I'm putting it order of most to least:

Soy sauce
Worchestershire Sauce
Ketchup
Cornstarch
Oyster Sauce
Sugar

And another one from chinesefooddiy website:

Brown Sauce

  (You'll often find this easy to make sauce accompanying popular dishes such as Beef with Broccoli at Chinese restaurants.)



Yield: 1/3 cups

Ingredients:


3/4 cup beef broth (beef bouillon cubes can be used)
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch (corn flour)


Perhaps the place you eat does it differently, maybe they'd actually tell you what's in it??

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Old 01-03-2005, 05:16 AM   #6
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Lee, I am sure there are many interested in your converted Chinese recipies - me included! I will still get egg foo young, but order it with the sauce on the side. Also hot mustard with it and that's what goes on top of mine. DH still uses the sauce, but very sparingly.
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Old 01-03-2005, 05:32 AM   #7
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Perhaps the restaurant uses arrowroot instead of cornstarch.
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Old 01-03-2005, 12:30 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lee140
If you're interested in making Chinese at home, let me know and I'll post some good recipes I've converted.
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Old 01-03-2005, 02:40 PM   #9
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And, Julie's little fingers are typing as fast as they can, typing ME, ME, ME, THANKS IN ADVANCE.
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Old 01-03-2005, 02:47 PM   #10
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As soon as I get my 3 rugrats to bed tonight, I'll start typing!!

Linda Sue- What is arrowroot? Is it a better alternative to cornstarch?
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Old 01-03-2005, 04:29 PM   #11
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Lee, I want chinese recipes! Love chinese! Italian cooking is going to make me grow! We will be looking for them, in the next posts that are made.
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Old 01-03-2005, 06:56 PM   #12
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First I'd like to say that when in a restaurant, I've always said I'm diabetic just to keep them honest.

Here's one of my tried and true:

lite soy (check labels-some have more carbs than others)
a little sesemee seed oil
sesemee seeds (toasted)
SF LC maple syrup
ginger
scallions
pepper
pinch of hot sauce/tobbasco (optional)

When cooking, if you want to thicken this or any other sauce- use egg yolk-does the trick every time.

Also- the above ingredients are best when left to marinate and flavors meld at least a few hours.
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Old 01-03-2005, 06:58 PM   #13
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Arrowroot is less carbs than cornstarch and is a thickener. I thin 1 round tsp has 3 carbs. I could be wrong though.
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Old 01-03-2005, 08:43 PM   #14
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Here are a few "tried and true" dishes. If you've never cooked Chinese food before, read on, if you're an old pro, skip this part and go on to recipes!

Ingredients
I've found all these ingredients at local grocery stores, except for the Steel's Hoisin Sauce. Almost all the recipes call for some of the same ingredients. It's worth it to keep them on hand, as they're not expensive, keep forever and you can throw together almost any of these recipes with meat and veggies you probably already have.

Dry Sherry: Make sure to buy dry, not sweet. No need to get really good sherry. I usually pay about $5/bottle. It'll last you forever

Fresh Ginger: If you can find the already minced or mashed fresh ginger in the produce section, that works great. Just never use powdered.

Soy Sauce: I think Kikkoman is the best of all the grocery store brands.

Rice Vinegar: Sometimes called Rice Wine Vinegar. Available in plain or with crushed red pepper flakes. I like my stuff spicy, so I use the red pepper variety. Be careful though, brands vary. I've seen carbs range from less than 1 to up to 5.

Sesame Oil: This is not a cooking oil. It's used for flavor only. It's very distinctive, and there really is no substitute. Sometimes you will see Mongolian Fire Oil, which is hot sesame oil (very good!).

Chinese Chili Sauce: A red, fiery hot sauce containing red chile peppers, vinegar and salt. Brands vary. Some add sugar. Also called Chili Garlic Sauce. I've found Tuong Ot Toi Viet-nam brand at the grocery in the ethnic aisle. It's the one with the rooster on the bottle. It's great! Lasts forever in the fridge.

Oyster Sauce: Brands vary. It should be just steamed oysters, soy sauce and salt, but some brands add sugar. Many restaurant "Brown Sauces" use oyster sauce as the base.

Hoisin Sauce: Sort of like intense Chinese BBQ sauce. Steel's makes a sugar free Hoisin sauce that's very good. Available at Netrition.com

Peanut Oil: All the recipes call for peanut oil because it can handle the heat without smoking. Canola is a good second choice.

Cornstarch: Almost every recipe calls for a small amount of cornstarch. 1 T cornstarch has 12.9 carbs or 4.3 carbs per teaspoon. If you don't want to use it, try subbing xantham gum instead, or simply omitting. I've also used Thicken/Thin Not Starch with some success. Each recipe serves 4, and to be honest, sometimes I just use the cornstarch, or try reducing the amount I use a little, since I'm in OWL and I don't think it adds that much to the carb total. But that said, use your favorate thickener, or just omit.

Cooking Tips:
If you don't have a wok, use a large saucepan or electric skillet.

Always heat the wok (or pan) over high heat first and then add the oil. If you add oil to a hot pan, your food won't stick to the pan.

Chinese cooking is all about the prep. The actual cooking time is very fast. Have your sauce, meat and veggies all by the stove ready to go.

Phew, that's a mouthful Hope you like the recipes!

Beef and Broccoli in Oyster Sauce (Brown Sauce)
Serves 4

¾ pound flank steak

Marinade:
1 T soy sauce
2 tsp dry sherry
2 tsp cornstarch

1 large stalk broccoli, about 10 ounces
2 T Oyster Sauce
1 T Soy Sauce
1 T dry sherry
1 T water
¼ tsp Splenda
2 tsp cornstarch mixed with 4 tsp water
3 T peanut oil
1 T minced garlic
2 T minced scallions, green and white parts

Thinly slice the steak and combine with the marinade ingredients.

Cut the broccoli into individual florets with long, thin stems (think how you see it in Chinese restaurants). Cook the broccoli in salted water briefly in boiling water. Rinse with cold water and set aside

Combine the oyster sauce, soy sauce, dry sherry, water and Splenda in a small bowl.

Heat the wok, large saucepan or electric skillet over high heat and swirl in 2 T of peanut oil. Stir fry the beef until it loses its red color, about 2 minutes. Remove from the pan.

Return the wok to high heat, swirl in the remaining oil. Stir fry the garlic and scallions just until their aroma is released, about 10 seconds. Add the blanched broccoli and toss to heat and coat with oil, about 30 seconds. Pour in the sauce and beef. Toss well and cook an additional minute. Drizzle in the cornstarch mixture, stirring constantly to thicken, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat and serve.

Lo Mein
Serves 4

½ pound Dreamfields Spaghetti
4 T peanut oil
½ pound cooked beef, chicken, pork or shrimp, thinly sliced
3 scallions, white and green parts, cut into 1 inch lengths
1 large cucumber seeded, peeled, cut into 2 inch chunks then halved again
½ pound (about 1 cup) bean sprouts

Sauce
2 T soy sauce
2 T oyster sauce
1 T dry sherry
1 tsp sesame oil
½ tsp salt
½ tsp Splenda

1 T minced garlic
1 T minced fresh ginger

Cook the noodles in boiling water until just done. Drain, rinse with cold water and then toss with 1 T peanut oil. Set aside. Combine the sauce ingredients in a bowl. Heat a wok, deep saucepan or electric skillet over high heat. Swirl in 3 T peanut oil and then stir fry the garlic and ginger just until their aroma is released, about 10 seconds. Stir fry the meat and scallions briefly and then add the cucumber and bean sprouts and cook for 1 minute. Pour in the sauce, toss well and add the noodles. Stir fry to combine with the sauce and heat through, about 1 minute more. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Beef with Onions and Peppers
Serves 4

¾ pound flank steak, cut into ½ inch cubes

Marinade:
2 tsp soy sauce
2 tsp sesame oil
2 tsp cornstarch

3 tsp minced garlic
1 tsp minced ginger
1 onion, peeled and cut into eighths
2 bell peppers (any color or mix of), cut into ½ inch cubes

Sauce:
2 T soy sauce
1 T dry sherry
½ tsp Splenda
½ tsp Chinese Chili Sauce (sub hot sesame oil with sugar free ketchup in a pinch)
1 tsp sesame oil

4 T peanut oil

Mix the marinade ingredients and then add the beef. Toss to coat. Marinate in the refrigerator for 1 hour. Meanwhile prepare the vegetables and combine the sauce ingredients in a bowl.

Heat the wok, deep saucepan or electric skillet over high heat. Heat 2 T of the oil and add the beef. Stir fry until it just loses it’s redness, about 3 minutes. Remove the meat. I set mine in a strainer over a bowl to drain the excess fat and oil.

Heat the remaining 2 T of oil in the wok. Stir fry the garlic and ginger just until the aroma is released, about 10 seconds. Add the onions and peppers and stir fry 1 ½ minutes, breaking up the onion layers as you stir and toss. Return the beef to the wok, pour in the sauce and stir fry an additional 2 minutes. Remove from heat and serve.

Chicken with Walnuts

Cubed chicken with nuts is considered a special occasion dish in China. This is delicious! Serves 4

¾ pound boneless, skinless chicken, cubed

Marinade:
1/2 egg white
1 tsp oyster sauce
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp white pepper

1 cup plus 3 T peanut oil
1 cup walnut halves
1 tsp minced garlic
1 tsp minced fresh ginger
1 T soy sauce
1 T dry sherry
1 tsp sesame oil
½ tsp Splenda

Place cubed chicken in a bowl with marinade ingredients. Mix well and set aside while preparing other ingredients.

Heat 1 cup of the peanut oil in a wok, deep saucepan or electric skillet to deep fry temperature (about 5 minutes). Fry the walnuts until golden but not dark brown, less than a minute. Transfer with slotted spoon to paper towels to drain. Pour off the used oil and wipe wok clean with paper towel.

Heat the wok over high heat and then add 2 T of the oil. Stir fry the chicken until it just loses its pink color, about 1 minute, and push to side.

Pour the remaining 1 T oil in the center, briefly stir fry the garlic and ginger (just until aroma is released, about a minute), and then add remaining ingredients. Stir to combine with the chicken over high heat for about a minute. Add the fried walnuts and stir to combine. Serve hot.
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Old 01-03-2005, 08:46 PM   #15
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More...

Summer Noodles with Spicy Peanut Sauce
Serves 4

½ pound Dreamfields Spaghetti
1 T sesame oil

Sauce
2 tsp minced or crushed garlic
2 tsp minced or crushed ginger
2 T soy sauce
¼ cup natural or Carb Options peanut butter (add Splenda to natural if using)
1 T sesame oil
2 T rice vinegar
2 T chicken broth or water
2 tsp chili oil or hot sesame oil (also called Mongolian Fire Oil)
1 T Splenda

2 cucumbers, peeled, seeded and shredded or finely chopped
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro for garnish (optional, but good)

Cook the noodles in salted water until just done. Drain and rinse with cold water. Toss with 1 T sesame oil and set aside.

Puree all the sauce ingredients in a blender or food processor. Toss the noodles with the sauce, sprinkle with the cucumbers and cilantro and serve at room temperature.

I also like to stir fry some chicken and then add the sauce to the wok just to heat it and then toss in the noodles to heat through. Garnish with the cucumbers and cilantro on the plate. I prefer it all warm, and with chicken.


Tangerine Chicken
This is also wonderful with scallops instead of the chicken. If using scallops, cut them into quarters.
Serves 4

Sauce
¼ cup chicken stock
1 T dry sherry
1 T soy sauce
1 tsp sesame oil
¼ tsp Chinese Chili Sauce
2 tsp Splenda
1 T grated orange or tangerine zest
½ T salt

1 pound boneless skinless chicken breasts, thinly sliced.
2 tsp minced fresh ginger
1 tsp minced garlic
1 large red pepper, cut into ½ inch cubes
2 scallions, white and green parts cut into 1 inch lengths
1 T cornstarch mixed with 2 T water
3 T peanut oil

Combine the sauce ingredients in a bowl. Place a wok, deep saucepan or electric skillet over high heat. Swirl in 1 T of the oil and stir fry the chicken until it just loses its’ pink color (about 2 minutes), if using scallops, until they just turn opaque (about 3 minutes). Remove from the pan.

Swirl the remaining 2 T oil into the wok and return to high heat. Stir fry the garlic and ginger with the red pepper and scallions about 2 minutes. Return the meat to the wok and pour in the sauce. Toss and stir another minute and then drizzle in the cornstarch mixture, stirring constantly for 1 minute more. Serve Hot.


Ma Po Pork

Serves 4
I know, TOFU, but I actually love this dish! It’s wonderfully flavorful. It’s meant to be served in a bowl, like a stew, so you’ll never miss the rice. I’ve seen Chinese restaurants serve it with peas, but it’s not supposed to have them and they’re high carby anyway!!

One 14 ounce package firm tofu, drained and cut into ½ inch cubes

Sauce
½ cup chicken broth
2 T dry sherry
2 T soy sauce
2 tsp black bean sauce (a little high carby, but a little goes a long way in this dish)
1 tsp sesame oil
½ tsp Chinese Chili Sauce
½ tsp Splenda
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp black pepper

1 T peanut oil
4 tsp minced garlic
4 scallions, white and green parts, minced
1 T minced fresh ginger
½ pound ground pork or pork loin, diced
¼ cup cilantro for garnish (optional)

Heat the wok, deep saucepan or electric skillet over high heat. While it’s heating, combine the sauce ingredients. Swirl the peanut oil into the wok and stir fry the garlic, scallions and ginger just until their aromas are released, about 30 seconds. Add the pork, stir and toss until it just loses its pink color, about 2 minutes. Pour in the sauce and cook over high heat 5 minutes.

Stir in the tofu to combine. Reduce heat to medium low and cook, stirring occasionally, 10 minutes, uncovered. When done, it should have the consistency of a moist stew, not soup. Serve in bowls and garnish with cilantro if desired.


Orange Scented Beef
Serves 4
This dish has 2 T of orange juice, but as it’s spread over 4 servings, I can’t think that it would add too many carbs. If you don’t want to use the juice, sub fresh squeezed lemon juice sweetened with Splenda. Sub lemon zest for the orange zest. Use chicken instead of the beef and you have a nice Chinese Lemon Chicken.

1 pound flank steak, thinly sliced across the grain
Marinade:
1 T soy sauce
2 tsp dry sherry
1 T peanut oil
½ tsp Splenda
1 T cornstarch

1 T grated orange zest
2 tsp minced fresh ginger

Sauce:
2 T orange juice
1 T soy sauce
1 tsp rice vinegar
2 tsp Splenda

3 T peanut oil

Combine the marinade ingredients and add the steak. Toss well to coat and refrigerate for at least one hour, up to a day.

Combine the sauce ingredients in a small bowl and place near the stove.

Heat the wok over high heat, swirl in 2 T of the oil. Stir fry the beef until it just loses it’s red color, about a minute. Spoon the beef into a strainer and place over a bowl to drain. Return the wok to high heat. Add the remaining 1 T of oil. Briefly stir fry the ginger and orange zest, about 10 seconds. Return the beef to the wok along with the sauce. Stir and toss 30 seconds, just to combine. Serve hot.


Stir Fry Pork with Green Beans
Serves 4

¾ pound pork loin, cut into ½ inch cubes

Marinade:
2 tsp soy sauce
2 tsp dry sherry
1 tsp cornstarch

¾ pound green beans, cut into 1 inch lengths

Sauce:
3 T chicken broth or water
1 T Sugar Free Hoisin Sauce (Steel’s makes it, available on Netrition)
1 T dry sherry
2 tsp soy sauce

2 tsp cornstarch mixed with 1 T water
6 Chinese dried black mushrooms soaked in hot water 15 minutes (or about 1 cup of any type fresh mushroom you like)
4 T peanut oil
2 tsp minced fresh ginger
2 tsp minced garlic

Combine the marinade ingredients and toss with the pork.

Cook the beans in salted, boiling water for about 3 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water.

Combine the sauce ingredients in a small bowl. Heat the wok over high heat, add 2 T of peanut oil and stir fry the pork until it just loses its pink color, about 2 minutes. Remove from the pan.

Swirl in the remaining 2 T oil. Cook the ginger and garlic about 10 seconds, and then add the blanched green beans and mushrooms. Stir fry 1 minute. Pour in the sauce and pork and toss well to coat. Drizzle in the cornstarch mixture, stirring constantly until it thickens and coats the food. Remove from heat and serve.


Hot Shrimp with Dipping Sauce

1 pound medium shrimp
3 T soy sauce
1 tsp rice vinegar
2 scallions, white and green thinly sliced
1 T peanut oil
¼ tsp chili oil or hot sesame oil (also called Mongolian Fire Oil)
1 tsp salt

Start boiling a large pot of water.

Prepare the dip by combining the soy sauce, rice vinegar and scallions. Place the peanut and chili oil in a small pan and cook over medium heat about 3 minutes. Pour into the scallion mixture.

When the water is rapidly boiling, add the salt and the shrimp. Reduce heat to medium and cook for 3 minutes. Shrimp are done when they turn pink.

Serve the shrimp with the scallion sauce for dipping
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Old 01-04-2005, 06:56 AM   #16
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Cornstarch and arrowroot are pretty close to the same amount of carbs and neither is suitable for low carb. Here's what the USDA site lists for both for 100 grams, which works out to approximately 4/5 of a cup. I think that by the time you cut that down to a teaspoon or so, the difference would be slight.

100 grams cornstarch
91.27 carbs
.9 fiber

100 grams arrowroot
88.15 carbs
3.4 fiber
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Old 01-04-2005, 07:28 AM   #17
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Lee140, thanks for the recipes all I can say is
YUM! I am gonna love trying these out.
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Old 01-04-2005, 07:48 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by SCOTTSDALEJULIE
Arrowroot is less carbs than cornstarch and is a thickener. I thin 1 round tsp has 3 carbs. I could be wrong though.
You are correct.

Although arrowroot has slightly more carbs than flour, it has twice the thickening ability. I combine arrowroot with other no carb thickeners to come up with a net carb of 3 carbs/serving of gravy. That number works for me and I can avoid using gum thickeners, which I'm not a big fan of.
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Old 01-04-2005, 10:10 AM   #19
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Thanks Scott and Lee. I am printing out your recipes right now, and can hardly wait to try them. Thanks for all your work. Julie
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Old 01-04-2005, 10:58 AM   #20
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Thank you Lee140 for all the recipes! I started a Chinese cookbook on MasterCook, and am excited about it. I've been very bad and eating Peanut Chicken in a local restaurant. I would love a recipe to convert it to low carb. This is the closest to how I think it is made:

Hyatt Chinese Peanut Chicken
1/3 C. soy sauce
3 T. hot (spicy) sesame oil, plus oil to saute chicken (divided)
1/4 C. packed brown sugar
1/4 C. pineapple juice
salt and white pepper to taste
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves, cut into julienne strips about 3 inches long
flour to dredge chicken

Sauce:
1 T. butter
1 T. flour
1/2 C. chicken stock
1/2 C. whipping cream
1/4 C. smooth or chunky peanut butter
Roasted peanuts and chopped green onions to garnish

In bowl, mix soy sauce, sesame oil, brown sugar, pineapple juice, salt and white pepper. Add chicken strips and marinate 2 to 3 hours in refrigerator. Drain and discard marinade. Dredge in flour; shaking off excess flour.

Heat medium-size skillet, then add additional oil to coat skillet. Saute chicken strips, turning occasionally, until golden brown and cooked through, about 2 minutes each side.

In small saucepan, over low heat, combine butter and flour and mix until smooth. Cook slowly until bubbly. Add stock and increase heat to high. When stock begins to thicken, add whipping cream and peanut butter, stirring until peanut butter is dissolved and sauce is creamy and the consistency of a heavy gravy.

Place chicken strips on plate, top with sauce and sprinkle with green onions and peanuts.

Makes 4 servings.

Do you have a recipe, or any suggestions?

Thank-you very much for inspiring me to be better!
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Old 01-04-2005, 04:16 PM   #21
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Gosh, Criosa, that recipe looks GOOD! Definitely worth trying to adapt to low carb. I'm copying it for future reference!

For the marinade I would try subbing Da Vinci Pineapple syrup for the pineapple juice/brown sugar. I've never tried it, so I don't know how good the pineapple flavor is though. They sell it on Netrition.com. I wouldn't worry about replacing the brown sugar, unless you have a brown sugar sub that you really like. As for dredging the flour, I don't think you'll really miss it if you make this recipe without the flour. Looking at the sauce ingredients, I think you will get a nice sauce without any flour or thickener added at all, but you could always add a tablespoon of cornstarch (add 12.9 carbs to the total recipe count). It does look like you should have a nice thick sauce without it though.

If you make this, let me know how it turns out! If you like the sweet/hot combo with peanut flavor, the "Summer Noodle w/Chicken variation" I posted is good. You can always just omit the noodle part. I sometimes up the hot sesame oil and Splenda to get a really spicy sweet/hot flavor. Bruce also posted a "Sesame Chicken" recipe with peanut butter too, that is very, very good.
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Old 01-04-2005, 04:38 PM   #22
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Lee, just wanted you to know, that I copied all the recipes.........and......sent them to my "LC" friends! Thanks, so much, for taking the time to do all that!
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Old 01-04-2005, 04:45 PM   #23
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Lee140,
Thanks for the suggestions. I never thought of DaVinci! I was thinking about Hood's pineapple/orange juice. And yes, I love the sweet hot taste. I also like Hot and Sour Soup. I don't make much Chinese food beyond stir frys - I quess it's time to get away from the Chinese restaurants, as I'm packing on the pounds here. I'll save money and weight. I plan on shopping Thurs, and will pick up what I need. I don't know if our local store has pineapple Davinci, but they have quite a lot of flavors on a good day. If not, maybe I can use pineapple flavored oil, and splenda.
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Old 01-04-2005, 09:42 PM   #24
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DV Pineapple syrup is great! I love the stuff. I use it for a sweet/sour sauce I make.

It's also really good mixed into full-fat yogurt or some cottage cheese, if you eat those things at whatever point you are at in your low carb plan!

Char
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Old 01-05-2005, 08:13 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally posted by Charski
DV Pineapple syrup is great! I love the stuff. I use it for a sweet/sour sauce I make.

It's also really good mixed into full-fat yogurt or some cottage cheese, if you eat those things at whatever point you are at in your low carb plan!

Char
Char,
I would love to have your sweet/sour sauce. I can add it to my little cookbook! With all these great recipes, why cheat?
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Old 01-05-2005, 08:42 AM   #26
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Thank you, thank you, thank you!
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Old 01-05-2005, 08:59 AM   #27
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Quote:
I also like Hot and Sour Soup.
I love Hot and Sour Soup too. I've made this recipe before, and it's good. You can adjust the seasonings to make it as hot or sour as you like!

Hot and Sour Soup
4 cups chicken stock or canned broth
1 pound boneless skinless chicken, shredded
1/2 cup mushroom type of your choice, sliced
2 ounces bamboo shoots, slivered (about 1/2 cup)
5 ounces firm tofu, slivered or cubed (about 1 cup)

Seasonings
2 Tablespoons Rice Vinegar (sub white vinegar in a pinch)
1 T soy sauce
1/2 tsp black pepper
1 teaspoon chili oil or hot sesame oil

2 T cornstarch mixed with 2 T water (I use only 1 T to save carbs)
1 egg beaten with 1 tsp sesame oil

Bring the chicken stock to a boil in a large saucepan. Add the chicken, mushrooms, bamboo shoots and tofu to the boiling stock. Reduce the heat and simmer about 3 minutes.

Stir in the seasonings. Bring back to a boil and then drizzle in the cornstarch mixture. Stir for about a minute until the soup thickens.

Turn off the heat. Pour in the beaten egg, stirring constantly to break into egg drop shreds. Serve hot.

Variations: Use shredded pork. Can also stir in shredded spinach or cabbage at the same time the chicken is added. To really make this authentic, use Chinese Black Vinegar and Tree Ear mushrooms if you can find them.
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Old 01-05-2005, 09:07 AM   #28
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It's really good to know the Pineapple Davinci is good! I'll order some with my next Netrition order, thanks!!

I was thinking about the pineapple juice/brown sugar combo in the original recipe. I'm thinking the flavor would be similar to a bottled marinade I used to buy called "Island Teriyaki" by Soy Vay (loaded with sugar ). If you could afford the carbs, it might be worth it to add some Splenda sweetened with 1 tsp molasses to get the right taste. One teaspoon blackstrap molasses would add 5 carbs to the entire recipe.

I was in the store this morning and looked at the oyster sauce they had in the asian aisle. The FIRST ingredient was sugar (Dynasty Brand). If you had to, I guess you could use it, since most of the recipes call for a very, very small amount, but it makes me mad ! Oyster sauce should have NO SUGAR. It should be simply steamed oyster juice, soy sauce and salt! WHY do they do this!!?? I buy mine at a local asian market and it has no sugar.
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Old 01-12-2005, 10:27 AM   #29
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Lee, I have made the brocolli beef, and the lo mein, and it was FANTASTIC!!! Thank you, so much, for these recipes. MORE, MORE, MORE! I really miss chinese food, but, don't miss rice. Hope everyone sees these recipes that you put on here. I had to hunt through the posts, to find this, again, just to tell you how great they are!
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Old 01-12-2005, 11:02 AM   #30
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Lee,
I'm with Cocapelle. If you have any more recipes, please post. I get a craving for Chinese food, and break down and eat out. I too made the Lo Mein, substituting zucchini for cucumber. Everyone loved it. I also made Egg Foo Yung, which was easy to make low carb. Here's a hint for one of my favorites: Kung Pao Shrimp (or chicken).
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