Low Carb Friends

Low Carb Friends (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/)
-   Low Carb Challenges! (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-challenges/)
-   -   overeaters and bingers... let's talk about strategies (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/low-carb-challenges/806000-overeaters-bingers-lets-talk-about-strategies.html)

rubidoux 06-12-2013 08:54 PM

overeaters and bingers... let's talk about strategies
 
Alright... I seem to be one of those that has to take two steps forward, one step back. I had been doing great for quite a while (would fall off the wagon every once in a while, but immediately get back on) and then this week I've had a bit of a rough patch, the worst I've had probably since january. Sigh... I think I've been eating off plan for most of four days, oh man, or is it five now? Denial is a funny thing. :confused: I did have one whole day on in there and parts of a couple of other days before I crashed and burned.

Tomorrow I swear I am gonna make it stick and keep going. I am going back to putting clapping guys in my sig, I think, bc that worked some magic for me in the past.

And I bought myself a new book on the subject of food addiction -- The End of Overeating by David Kessler, which I plan on putting my attention into instead of food.

But I thought it might also help if you all tell me some of your best weapons against urges to eat off plan or binge.

I'll start. :) Obviously these don't work 100%, but they have helped me an awful lot. I used to eat worse *every day* than I do now even on a really bad day. And in the last five or six months I've strung quite a few good days together.

Anyhow, two things I try to think of if I want to cheat are:

-- how it will ALL feel, the actual eating (usually it's disappointing, but even if it's not, it only lasts for a few minutes and whatever pleasure there is in it is so fleeting); the immediate aftermath (oh god, how could I go and blow it like that? and ugh, I already feel gross!); the consequences (out of ketosis :( , gained like four pounds -- it's always four pounds for me! -- spend five days trying to just get back to where I was, feel bad because I failed to stick to my plan). Often if I manage to make myself think all that through, it doesn't seem as appealing.

-- if I cheat, I'm building bad neural pathways that will reinforce my need to eat crap, but if I manage to resist, I'm building up my resistance muscle and the neural pathways that will make it easier to resist next time.

Now, hopefully, I'll get to put a clappy guy in my sig tomorrow. Anyone having trouble sticking to your plan and want to join me?

spaceace 06-12-2013 11:11 PM

my new approach
 
This comes from someone in the mental health field, so pardon my slightly clinical angle here. I too have fallen off the wagon many times, after months of really good habits. I figured this time, why not apply what I do with clients to myself.

I recently have tried to apply some cognitive therapy to myself, meaning that I identify triggers, high-risk situations, and (for me) most importantly the irrational thoughts that lead to my downfalls. I am going to concentrate on the irrational thoughts in this post, because many of us know our triggers and when we are likely to encounter them already.

I have to accept that, yes, I make irrational decisions because because my brain manufactures these irrational thoughts in much the same way that an addict's brain does for their drug of choice. The brain designs these very strong and pointed thoughts because it wants to feel good NOW, and would easily choose to feel great for the 1-10 minutes as the taste buds send powerful messages to the brain that it should experience ecstasy (the feeling not the drug). The part of the brain that inspires these irrational thoughts is very primitive and only cares about feeling good in the extreme short term, it simply is not designed to consider long-term consequences so it won't - period. It's the same as the crack addict who time after time says "this is it, this is ruining every aspect of my life" but chooses again and again to restart their addiction.

Anyway, here are some of my irrational thoughts, and thoughts I have to manually choose to replace them with when they come. Knowing that these thoughts are coming helps me, and with practice replacing them becomes easier.

1. I can have just one piece of birthday cake. Replace with: Yes I want that birthday cake, but experience has shown me that afterward I will feel awful, will crave more, and may throw away my WOE for a long long time. I might get away with it a few times, but eventually this type of choosing causing me to give up everything I've gained. So I must choose "no" now - and every time - to avoid that game of Russian roulette. (And just as in Russian Roulette, my life is truly in danger.)

2. I deserve to taste this wonderful-tasting food. Replace with: I can have this food but it is not so wonderful, because I really don't want obesity, diabetes, shameful feelings, shorter life, and heart attacks that go with it. If I choose the food, I choose these things at the same time. No getting around it.

3. I will look like an outcast if I don't eat what everyone else is eating. Replace with: I will chose to do what is best for me. I may feel weird in this social situation, but it is not the end of the world and it will be over in a few hours at most. There is no chance that someone will kill me because I chose not to eat that stuff.

4. I just had something with too many carbs, I might as well just binge right now and get back on track tomorrow. Replace with: WARNING! I just ate something that I shouldn't have eaten; if I don't get right on track right this second I will end up farther and farther from my goals with every passing minute. [This one is like the driver that misses his exit and figures he might as well just keep on driving - we obviously wouldn't do this because it is irrational! Make the U-Turn as soon as it is safe and legal to do so, which is right now!] :help:

5. I've been stuck at this weight for weeks. I might as well just eat what I want since this isn't working. Replace with: I knew before I started that plateaus are part of weight loss, and I am experiencing something that I knew was going to happen so I shouldn't be surprised. Instead, I will stay the course or try to change things in my plan that are still consistent with my plan, like upping my fat, changing my workout routine, or giving my scale to a friend (along with $20 that he gets to keep if he doesn't give my scale back until the date I specified.)

6. This persons' feelings will be hurt if I don't eat this. Replace with: This person can choose to feel hurt or not because I do not want to eat their food; their feelings really have nothing to do with my choice to be healthy. The irrationality is theirs, not mine.

These are just some ideas, they may or may not work for you. Maybe they will work for somebody. I've only been trying these approaches a few weeks, but it is nice when a craving occurs to be able to identify the thought that my brain makes to try to get me to do what it wants, and to already know how to combat that thought with one that is more useful and rational. Anyway, it gives me a sense of power to be approaching this with a different plan after several really valiant attempts (as long as 6 months) have eventually failed.

Good luck on your WOE! :hiya:

Leo41 06-13-2013 01:10 AM

spaceace-
Thanks for this great post! I've saved your 3rd paragraph to my desktop so that I can read it regularly to remind myself of the 'process' at work in my brain.

I've read similar ideas in books like Brain Over Binge, but often it's difficult to keep those ideas present when my 'lower brain' is taunting me.

With frequent re-reading, I hope to keep your succint explanation current at all times to 'balance' those taunts.

Biochic 06-13-2013 03:32 AM

Wonderful posts...thank you
 
I am a huge fan of full fat plain yogurt mixed with SF jello pudding powder. This stuff has helped me feel less deprived which is key to staying on plan for me. I put all kinds of things in my yogurt but most often I use sunbutter or fruit (berries). While everyone else is eating ice cream cake, I'm all over my yogurt and I don't feel at all left out of the "fun".
I eat the yogurt for breakfast during the week and also lunch on most days.

I still have the urge to binge occasionally but never because I feel like I'm missing out on the joy of social eating. I can have my meal and dessert...and sometime my meal tastes just like deasert:)

emel 06-13-2013 04:34 AM

Good posts.
I have the beginnings of an eating disorder (NES), so expecting willpower to solve my issue is foolish. I think behavior therapy is a valid tool, but I believe we have to also look at nutrition. Sometimes urges or cravings are our body's signal that we are deficient in a micronutrient.

I've read Julia Ross' "The Diet Cure", which advocates heavy supplementation for weight loss and other issues. There are some good points in there but it is a LOT of pills, so I have not succeeded in complying with her plan. I may reread it to see if I want to start one or two more supplements. And I'm a big fan of getting micronutrients through foods.

Patience 06-13-2013 05:52 AM

It's a great list, SpaceAce. What works for me, is to telll my self "it's just a craving." Subtext is "a craving never killed anyone." Somehow "naming it" helps me. If that doesn't work, I always eat something that is acceptable as something that is acceptable.

Jayne, I agree with your emphasis on strategies, and I agree with emil that willpower is not enough. Although sometimes our body is craving what it needs, I suspect in most cases of binging the body is not needing (perhaps wanting!) sugar.

Oh yes, Leo nailed it for me with "it's difficult to keep those ideas present when my 'lower brain' is taunting me." We have to keep practicing and perhaps customize and refine our lists of what works best for us.

clackley 06-13-2013 06:55 AM

I have experienced what you describe to the 't'. I won't tell you how long it took me to overcome it but it was a long time. I didn't know what I was doing but only knew I had to get to the other side so to speak. For all that struggle, I did learn a few things about myself.

1. Carbs are the problem and fat is not.

2. I do not have an issue with self-control but I do have a physiological issue when carbs are present in my body.

3. There is no better feeling than having control over my eating without intrusive thoughts of foods that I shouldn't eat.

The only way I have gotten to this point is to go vlc and stay there. I am very carb sensitive and have accepted that. I have done a ton of reading, listening and discussion on the subject and this for me, is an either/or situation and there is no middle ground. Ketosis is my saving grace.

I love the way I get to eat - in other words, I have fully embraced the woe. I look at off plan foods as poison - which they truly are to me. The long term effects of sugar, wheat and starches are very much a slow death.

All this to say that there is no 'cheat' in my vocabulary. I never feel deprived and I always feel in control. That is quite a difference from me about 4 years ago. I never forget how that felt and never risk going back there.

I am not 'strong or disciplined'...far from it. I am simply determined to hold onto this peace I have achieved in my mind and body.

I suggest reading and studying the benefits of ketosis.

Luca 06-13-2013 07:15 AM

:goodpost:

Thanks everyone!

Sugarfreebabe 06-13-2013 07:20 AM

I had to ust delete pizza huts number from my phone they are my biggest problem i can eat 2 large stuffed crust at a time w a diet coke :(

and sweets like tres leches omg weakness but we all have to kick our cravings and find what works for us

peanutte 06-13-2013 07:21 AM

Quote:

I identify triggers, high-risk situations, and (for me) most importantly the irrational thoughts that lead to my downfalls.
spaceace, I'm not going to quote your post because of the length, but I liked what you said, and that is some really good work you're doing. I have had each one of those internal conversations myself at times. If you keep forcing yourself to evaluate the cost and benefit of these choices, it does get easier with practice.

Willpower, at least the way I define willpower, is something with its roots in humility, not arrogance. For me, willpower has its place in those moments where I feel like doing one thing, but know I truly want the results of something else. For example, if I couldn't admit to myself that I will probably never be a "natural exerciser", I wouldn't anticipate my own reluctance to work out--which happens all the time. I may not want to, but I do want what comes during and after that workout. So I make myself do it and I'm never sorry I did. But I rarely have the sense that "I can't wait to work out today! I'm so looking forward to it!" That just isn't a natural, intuitive, or involuntary feeling for me. Fortunately, I don't trust a lot of natural feelings; I trust my goals, and I trust that my values are more important than my momentary desires. So to me, that's what willpower means: the power to say "I will do it" when I want to say "Eh, who cares."

I also agree with this:

Quote:

-- how it will ALL feel, the actual eating (usually it's disappointing, but even if it's not, it only lasts for a few minutes and whatever pleasure there is in it is so fleeting);
This really cannot be stated or emphasized often enough, if you ask me. Stephen Gullo suggests, in The Thin Commandments, that we remind ourselves we've already eaten that particular, tempting, craved food many times, and it's never made us happier, only heavier.

JKat 06-13-2013 07:53 AM

Thank u great thread !! I plan on copying it. We can never stop trying to figure it out

scalestepper 06-13-2013 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaceace (Post 16468290)
This comes from someone in the mental health field, so pardon my slightly clinical angle here. I too have fallen off the wagon many times, after months of really good habits. I figured this time, why not apply what I do with clients to myself.

I recently have tried to apply some cognitive therapy to myself, meaning that I identify triggers, high-risk situations, and (for me) most importantly the irrational thoughts that lead to my downfalls. I am going to concentrate on the irrational thoughts in this post, because many of us know our triggers and when we are likely to encounter them already.

I have to accept that, yes, I make irrational decisions because because my brain manufactures these irrational thoughts in much the same way that an addict's brain does for their drug of choice. The brain designs these very strong and pointed thoughts because it wants to feel good NOW, and would easily choose to feel great for the 1-10 minutes as the taste buds send powerful messages to the brain that it should experience ecstasy (the feeling not the drug). The part of the brain that inspires these irrational thoughts is very primitive and only cares about feeling good in the extreme short term, it simply is not designed to consider long-term consequences so it won't - period. It's the same as the crack addict who time after time says "this is it, this is ruining every aspect of my life" but chooses again and again to restart their addiction.

Anyway, here are some of my irrational thoughts, and thoughts I have to manually choose to replace them with when they come. Knowing that these thoughts are coming helps me, and with practice replacing them becomes easier.

1. I can have just one piece of birthday cake. Replace with: Yes I want that birthday cake, but experience has shown me that afterward I will feel awful, will crave more, and may throw away my WOE for a long long time. I might get away with it a few times, but eventually this type of choosing causing me to give up everything I've gained. So I must choose "no" now - and every time - to avoid that game of Russian roulette. (And just as in Russian Roulette, my life is truly in danger.)

2. I deserve to taste this wonderful-tasting food. Replace with: I can have this food but it is not so wonderful, because I really don't want obesity, diabetes, shameful feelings, shorter life, and heart attacks that go with it. If I choose the food, I choose these things at the same time. No getting around it.

3. I will look like an outcast if I don't eat what everyone else is eating. Replace with: I will chose to do what is best for me. I may feel weird in this social situation, but it is not the end of the world and it will be over in a few hours at most. There is no chance that someone will kill me because I chose not to eat that stuff.

4. I just had something with too many carbs, I might as well just binge right now and get back on track tomorrow. Replace with: WARNING! I just ate something that I shouldn't have eaten; if I don't get right on track right this second I will end up farther and farther from my goals with every passing minute. [This one is like the driver that misses his exit and figures he might as well just keep on driving - we obviously wouldn't do this because it is irrational! Make the U-Turn as soon as it is safe and legal to do so, which is right now!] :help:

5. I've been stuck at this weight for weeks. I might as well just eat what I want since this isn't working. Replace with: I knew before I started that plateaus are part of weight loss, and I am experiencing something that I knew was going to happen so I shouldn't be surprised. Instead, I will stay the course or try to change things in my plan that are still consistent with my plan, like upping my fat, changing my workout routine, or giving my scale to a friend (along with $20 that he gets to keep if he doesn't give my scale back until the date I specified.)

6. This persons' feelings will be hurt if I don't eat this. Replace with: This person can choose to feel hurt or not because I do not want to eat their food; their feelings really have nothing to do with my choice to be healthy. The irrationality is theirs, not mine.

These are just some ideas, they may or may not work for you. Maybe they will work for somebody. I've only been trying these approaches a few weeks, but it is nice when a craving occurs to be able to identify the thought that my brain makes to try to get me to do what it wants, and to already know how to combat that thought with one that is more useful and rational. Anyway, it gives me a sense of power to be approaching this with a different plan after several really valiant attempts (as long as 6 months) have eventually failed.

Good luck on your WOE! :hiya:

:goodpost: awesome, thank you! So I must choose "no" now!

Beeb 06-13-2013 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaceace (Post 16468290)
This comes from someone in the mental health field, so pardon my slightly clinical angle here. I too have fallen off the wagon many times, after months of really good habits. I figured this time, why not apply what I do with clients to myself.

I recently have tried to apply some cognitive therapy to myself, meaning that I identify triggers, high-risk situations, and (for me) most importantly the irrational thoughts that lead to my downfalls. I am going to concentrate on the irrational thoughts in this post, because many of us know our triggers and when we are likely to encounter them already.

I have to accept that, yes, I make irrational decisions because because my brain manufactures these irrational thoughts in much the same way that an addict's brain does for their drug of choice. The brain designs these very strong and pointed thoughts because it wants to feel good NOW, and would easily choose to feel great for the 1-10 minutes as the taste buds send powerful messages to the brain that it should experience ecstasy (the feeling not the drug). The part of the brain that inspires these irrational thoughts is very primitive and only cares about feeling good in the extreme short term, it simply is not designed to consider long-term consequences so it won't - period. It's the same as the crack addict who time after time says "this is it, this is ruining every aspect of my life" but chooses again and again to restart their addiction.

Anyway, here are some of my irrational thoughts, and thoughts I have to manually choose to replace them with when they come. Knowing that these thoughts are coming helps me, and with practice replacing them becomes easier.

1. I can have just one piece of birthday cake. Replace with: Yes I want that birthday cake, but experience has shown me that afterward I will feel awful, will crave more, and may throw away my WOE for a long long time. I might get away with it a few times, but eventually this type of choosing causing me to give up everything I've gained. So I must choose "no" now - and every time - to avoid that game of Russian roulette. (And just as in Russian Roulette, my life is truly in danger.)

2. I deserve to taste this wonderful-tasting food. Replace with: I can have this food but it is not so wonderful, because I really don't want obesity, diabetes, shameful feelings, shorter life, and heart attacks that go with it. If I choose the food, I choose these things at the same time. No getting around it.

3. I will look like an outcast if I don't eat what everyone else is eating. Replace with: I will chose to do what is best for me. I may feel weird in this social situation, but it is not the end of the world and it will be over in a few hours at most. There is no chance that someone will kill me because I chose not to eat that stuff.

4. I just had something with too many carbs, I might as well just binge right now and get back on track tomorrow. Replace with: WARNING! I just ate something that I shouldn't have eaten; if I don't get right on track right this second I will end up farther and farther from my goals with every passing minute. [This one is like the driver that misses his exit and figures he might as well just keep on driving - we obviously wouldn't do this because it is irrational! Make the U-Turn as soon as it is safe and legal to do so, which is right now!] :help:

5. I've been stuck at this weight for weeks. I might as well just eat what I want since this isn't working. Replace with: I knew before I started that plateaus are part of weight loss, and I am experiencing something that I knew was going to happen so I shouldn't be surprised. Instead, I will stay the course or try to change things in my plan that are still consistent with my plan, like upping my fat, changing my workout routine, or giving my scale to a friend (along with $20 that he gets to keep if he doesn't give my scale back until the date I specified.)

6. This persons' feelings will be hurt if I don't eat this. Replace with: This person can choose to feel hurt or not because I do not want to eat their food; their feelings really have nothing to do with my choice to be healthy. The irrationality is theirs, not mine.

These are just some ideas, they may or may not work for you. Maybe they will work for somebody. I've only been trying these approaches a few weeks, but it is nice when a craving occurs to be able to identify the thought that my brain makes to try to get me to do what it wants, and to already know how to combat that thought with one that is more useful and rational. Anyway, it gives me a sense of power to be approaching this with a different plan after several really valiant attempts (as long as 6 months) have eventually failed.

Good luck on your WOE! :hiya:

OMG....Printed and saved!! Thank you so much!! :hugs::shake:

Last week I threw all my "binge trigger" foods away, ALL OF THEM!! (Here is a link to my thread about this: http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/ma...verything.html) Now I'm eating ONLY fruits, veggies, nuts, and good carbs....NO MORE JUNK FOOD ALLOWED in the house and will make good choices when I go out. I still eat 2 meals with carbs (sweet potato, brown rice, whole wheat pasta, whole grain bread, etc.) but most of the plate is made up of protein and veggies. Snacks are fruit or nuts only. I feel better, I haven't had the urge to binge (I have Night Eating Syndrome/Bringing) and I feel more in control and a lot better than I have in months!! :clap:

My other strategy is "ONE DAY AT A TIME"! IF I make it through this day, today, I'm moving in the right direction and if I don't tomorrow is another "clean slate" day! ;)

Beeb 06-13-2013 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by peanutte (Post 16468605)
This really cannot be stated or emphasized often enough, if you ask me. Stephen Gullo suggests, in The Thin Commandments, that we remind ourselves we've already eaten that particular, tempting, craved food many times, and it's never made us happier, only heavier.

I googled "The Thin Commandments" and this is what I came up with: :eek:

Thin Commandments

1. If you aren't thin you aren't attractive.
2. Being thin is more important than being healthy.
3. You must buy clothes, cut your hair, take laxatives, starve yourself, do anything to make yourself look thinner.
4. Thou shall not eat without feeling guilty.
5. Thou shall not eat fattening food without punishing oneself afterwards.
6. Thou shall count calories and restrict intake accordingly.
7. What the scale says is the most important thing.
8. Losing weight is good/gaining weight is bad.
9. You can never be too thin.
10. Being thin and not eating are signs of true will power and success.

I DON'T think this is the one you are referring too, but this is the first one I found under the google search and to find this is scary when looking for your suggestion!! WOW!! :eek::down:

Just goes to shows us we need to be careful what we google/search and read.....Will look under the author's name now!

peanutte 06-13-2013 09:08 AM

Um, I don't know what that is, but it has nothing to do with Stephen Gullo's book.

DD80 06-13-2013 09:33 AM

Hello :hiya: Fellow binger here!

I started having sharp pains in my stomach, under my ribs, and bouts of indigestion (which I've never really had). I was tested for celiac, and it was negative, but I still decided to try gluten free. I have other autoimmune issues (thyroid and psoriasis) and after doing a lot of reading, I decided that this was a great decision. It has been. I have a lot of nerve pain (that I've been doing chiro, massage, and physical therapy for) and it has been greatly reduced since being off gluten. I am kind of amazed. My stomach pains have reduced as well. Indigestion happens randomly, but I'll give it some more time.

I am telling you this because this has helped me cut out a lot of the foods that cause me to binge and crave. Once I could view these foods as poison and causing pain, it has become impossible for me to have something like a cupcake - the pleasure of it simply is not enough when viewed in terms of the damage that it is doing to me. I've been reading up on paleo/primal because it is wheat/grain free. Don't know if I can give up dairy just yet, but I like where I'm at. The only problem has been a strange feeling like there is nothing to eat that sounds good...like an emptiness. I hope that will start going away as my body gets used to no gluten.

Again, I always say this - but reading has helped too. I've read books from diet to metabolism to brain chemisty to EMDR to how to have "thin person" thinking. All have helped. Information is power and we should all use it to our advantage.

Strawberry 06-13-2013 09:53 AM

Re: the (non-Stephen Gullo) Thin Commandments... was that serious!? Yikes, I was at first thinking it was a joke.

I can't say I really binge... but staying on plan is really hard for me lately. One tip I use is to not bring a credit card or cash when I'm out so that I cant decide to swing through a takeout place or store and buy something off plan. (its a good budgeting tip too!)

emel 06-13-2013 10:15 AM

Wanted to post this in fairness to Dr. Gullo. These are his Thin Commandments:

1. Strategy is stronger than willpower.
2. Think historically, not just "calorically."
3. The problem may be in the food, not you.
4. Structure gives control.
5. Separate mood from food.
6. Take control of your favorite foods.
7. Slips should teach you, not defeat you.
8. Stop feeling deprived.
9. Treat your calories like dollars.
10. Losing weight is half the job. Keeping if off is the other half.

peanutte 06-13-2013 10:52 AM

Thank you for posting that, emel. His book is really good for the psychological and behavioral stuff. Most of us who do low-carb won't have much use for his diet recommendations, but the topics and strategies he talks about are really eye-opening and practical, no matter what kind of diet plan anyone is on.

momov2boys 06-13-2013 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clackley (Post 16468571)
I am not 'strong or disciplined'...far from it.
I am simply determined to hold onto this peace I have achieved in my mind and body.

:high5:

rubidoux 06-13-2013 11:14 AM

Yay! So much to think about in this thread! :notwrthy:

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaceace (Post 16468290)
I have to accept that, yes, I make irrational decisions because because my brain manufactures these irrational thoughts in much the same way that an addict's brain does for their drug of choice. The brain designs these very strong and pointed thoughts because it wants to feel good NOW, and would easily choose to feel great for the 1-10 minutes as the taste buds send powerful messages to the brain that it should experience ecstasy (the feeling not the drug). The part of the brain that inspires these irrational thoughts is very primitive and only cares about feeling good in the extreme short term, it simply is not designed to consider long-term consequences so it won't - period. It's the same as the crack addict who time after time says "this is it, this is ruining every aspect of my life" but chooses again and again to restart their addiction.

Anyway, here are some of my irrational thoughts, and thoughts I have to manually choose to replace them with when they come. Knowing that these thoughts are coming helps me, and with practice replacing them becomes easier.

It is so important for me to really hold those bolded parts in the front of my mind. Sometimes I can tell myself that the food is not even good (this is almost true), I only *think* it is bc of the way it effects my brain.

I love your idea of writing out/rehearsing dialogues. I have done something similar but maybe not taken it to its endpoint. I have identified a lot of those kinds of situations but I need to experiment with having an actual answer for myself already prepared.

One of my big ones lately that I have been thinking about is that if an occasion comes up where it would make sense for me to eat off plan (my plan is very severe, sadly, and I usually don't eat any veggies, so if we go out with friends sometimes I'll eat off plan and have a salad or something that's very Atkins-friendly, but not something that I'd normally eat), I will obsess about it beforehand and kind of blow it all out of proportion in my head and that will inevitably end with me feeling disappointed in whatever happens and then cheating worse than I meant to. I need to come up with a better way of thinking about it and concrete plan and follow through with it next time.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Biochic (Post 16468350)
I am a huge fan of full fat plain yogurt mixed with SF jello pudding powder. This stuff has helped me feel less deprived which is key to staying on plan for me. I put all kinds of things in my yogurt but most often I use sunbutter or fruit (berries). While everyone else is eating ice cream cake, I'm all over my yogurt and I don't feel at all left out of the "fun".
I eat the yogurt for breakfast during the week and also lunch on most days.

I still have the urge to binge occasionally but never because I feel like I'm missing out on the joy of social eating. I can have my meal and dessert...and sometime my meal tastes just like deasert:)

I have a decadent snack that I have once in a while that seems to help with the deprivation build-up. I have 1 ounce of trader joe's mesquite almonds, 1 ounce (or sometimes a little more depending on my calories for the day) of trader joe's unexpected cheddar, and 2 little wedges of dark chocolate. It takes a while to eat and is very yummy and satisfying. :) I actually ran out of my unexpected cheddar and haven't been able to get to TJ's to get some. I wonder if I woulda done better this week if I'd had some.

Its funny that you mention yogurt bc I have tried so hard to make full fat yogurt part of my plan. I think it just has too many carbs for me and gets my cravings going again. I think my system may just be more damaged than a lot of people's. Sigh...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bella (Post 16468512)
Jayne, I agree with your emphasis on strategies, and I agree with emil that willpower is not enough. Although sometimes our body is craving what it needs, I suspect in most cases of binging the body is not needing (perhaps wanting!) sugar.

We have to keep practicing and perhaps customize and refine our lists of what works best for us.

I don't think I can have too many tools and strategies to get through this. And I absolutely feel that practice is necessary. I have done so much better, but I have a ways to go and I think I need to just keep working, working, working. One good thing I've done, I think, is to JUST KEEP GOING. In the past, there'd always be a point where I just fell off and could not get back on and that would lead to months or a year or more of being back in my depressing hole of unhealthy overeating and denial. But I feel pretty determined to keep going no matter how many times I fall off. Of course, I am still scared of somehow ending up back at that place and there are no guarantees.

Quote:

Originally Posted by clackley (Post 16468571)
I have experienced what you describe to the 't'. I won't tell you how long it took me to overcome it but it was a long time. I didn't know what I was doing but only knew I had to get to the other side so to speak. For all that struggle, I did learn a few things about myself.

1. Carbs are the problem and fat is not.

2. I do not have an issue with self-control but I do have a physiological issue when carbs are present in my body.

3. There is no better feeling than having control over my eating without intrusive thoughts of foods that I shouldn't eat.

The only way I have gotten to this point is to go vlc and stay there. I am very carb sensitive and have accepted that. I have done a ton of reading, listening and discussion on the subject and this for me, is an either/or situation and there is no middle ground. Ketosis is my saving grace.

I love the way I get to eat - in other words, I have fully embraced the woe. I look at off plan foods as poison - which they truly are to me. The long term effects of sugar, wheat and starches are very much a slow death.

All this to say that there is no 'cheat' in my vocabulary. I never feel deprived and I always feel in control. That is quite a difference from me about 4 years ago. I never forget how that felt and never risk going back there.

I am not 'strong or disciplined'...far from it. I am simply determined to hold onto this peace I have achieved in my mind and body.

I suggest reading and studying the benefits of ketosis.

It's so good to hear that you've come out the other side. I would love to be able to really counting on being in control someday. I completely agree that ketosis is an absolutely necessary component in this. I would seriously have no hope at all if I was trying to have sensible portions of carbs or some such nonsense.

I think this is important to think of when I'm feeling tempted: "There is no better feeling than having control over my eating without intrusive thoughts of foods that I shouldn't eat." It is so true (I have had days at a time where I've been that way, I'd love to be that way all the time!) and the only way to get there, I think, is to string together many, many on plan days together. Going off plan can really set this back, I think.

Quote:

Originally Posted by peanutte (Post 16468605)
If you keep forcing yourself to evaluate the cost and benefit of these choices, it does get easier with practice.

This really cannot be stated or emphasized often enough, if you ask me. Stephen Gullo suggests, in The Thin Commandments, that we remind ourselves we've already eaten that particular, tempting, craved food many times, and it's never made us happier, only heavier.

I love all of this!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beeb (Post 16468740)
Last week I threw all my "binge trigger" foods away, ALL OF THEM!!

My other strategy is "ONE DAY AT A TIME"! IF I make it through this day, today, I'm moving in the right direction and if I don't tomorrow is another "clean slate" day! ;)

I used to always have binge-worthy stuff I could eat in the house bc I have kids and I don't feel right about keeping the house totally devoid of anything yummy. But, sad for the little guys, lately we really haven't had anything good to eat here. In a way it has helped, but I have to say that there's nothing more frustrating than to be here determined to cheat and not have anything good to cheat with. :o I think it helps most before I've become determined, but once I have... there's probably no stopping me. Or maybe that should be my next thing I work on, how to stop once I've already crossed that line.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DD80 (Post 16468829)
I started having sharp pains in my stomach, under my ribs, and bouts of indigestion (which I've never really had). I was tested for celiac, and it was negative, but I still decided to try gluten free. I have other autoimmune issues (thyroid and psoriasis) and after doing a lot of reading, I decided that this was a great decision. It has been. I have a lot of nerve pain (that I've been doing chiro, massage, and physical therapy for) and it has been greatly reduced since being off gluten. I am kind of amazed. My stomach pains have reduced as well. Indigestion happens randomly, but I'll give it some more time.

I am telling you this because this has helped me cut out a lot of the foods that cause me to binge and crave. Once I could view these foods as poison and causing pain, it has become impossible for me to have something like a cupcake - the pleasure of it simply is not enough when viewed in terms of the damage that it is doing to me. I've been reading up on paleo/primal because it is wheat/grain free. Don't know if I can give up dairy just yet, but I like where I'm at. The only problem has been a strange feeling like there is nothing to eat that sounds good...like an emptiness. I hope that will start going away as my body gets used to no gluten.

Again, I always say this - but reading has helped too. I've read books from diet to metabolism to brain chemisty to EMDR to how to have "thin person" thinking. All have helped. Information is power and we should all use it to our advantage.

I am grain free, too, and I agree that's a huge help in all this. I don't know if I'm celiac, but type I diabetes is an autoimmune disease and 1 in 10 type I's have celiacs. So, given all my messed up health/eating issues, I think there's a pretty good chance I do.

I haven't read Wheat Belly yet, but I need to. I agree that knowledge is power and I've also been reading about all the different facets of the problem. I also think that just the process of doing all the reading and talking and thinking about it is important. It helps me to be constantly keep it in the forefront and not allow myself to push it out of my mind.

rubidoux 06-13-2013 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by emel (Post 16468882)
Wanted to post this in fairness to Dr. Gullo. These are his Thin Commandments:

1. Strategy is stronger than willpower.
2. Think historically, not just "calorically."
3. The problem may be in the food, not you.
4. Structure gives control.
5. Separate mood from food.
6. Take control of your favorite foods.
7. Slips should teach you, not defeat you.
8. Stop feeling deprived.
9. Treat your calories like dollars.
10. Losing weight is half the job. Keeping if off is the other half.

Ooooh, so much of this has come up for me. I think I need to read this book, too. :)

emel 06-13-2013 11:23 AM

And thanks to Peanutte for bringing up the Gullo stuff.

You know, the lower brain is pretty much our inner toddler---
But why can't I have a cookie!!! I want a cookie now now now!!!!
Just as we don't abuse the child for having childlike wants, we don't need to bash ourselves for having lower brain thoughts. In both cases, we need to handle the 'tantrums' thoughtfully when they arise.

Jackie123 06-13-2013 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clackley (Post 16468571)
I have experienced what you describe to the 't'. I won't tell you how long it took me to overcome it but it was a long time. I didn't know what I was doing but only knew I had to get to the other side so to speak. For all that struggle, I did learn a few things about myself.

1. Carbs are the problem and fat is not.

2. I do not have an issue with self-control but I do have a physiological issue when carbs are present in my body.

3. There is no better feeling than having control over my eating without intrusive thoughts of foods that I shouldn't eat.

The only way I have gotten to this point is to go vlc and stay there. I am very carb sensitive and have accepted that. I have done a ton of reading, listening and discussion on the subject and this for me, is an either/or situation and there is no middle ground. Ketosis is my saving grace.

I love the way I get to eat - in other words, I have fully embraced the woe. I look at off plan foods as poison - which they truly are to me. The long term effects of sugar, wheat and starches are very much a slow death.

All this to say that there is no 'cheat' in my vocabulary. I never feel deprived and I always feel in control. That is quite a difference from me about 4 years ago. I never forget how that felt and never risk going back there.

I am not 'strong or disciplined'...far from it. I am simply determined to hold onto this peace I have achieved in my mind and body.

I suggest reading and studying the benefits of ketosis.


This is my exact experience, to a tee.

Beeb 06-13-2013 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by emel (Post 16468882)
Wanted to post this in fairness to Dr. Gullo. These are his Thin Commandments:

1. Strategy is stronger than willpower.
2. Think historically, not just "calorically."
3. The problem may be in the food, not you.
4. Structure gives control.
5. Separate mood from food.
6. Take control of your favorite foods.
7. Slips should teach you, not defeat you.
8. Stop feeling deprived.
9. Treat your calories like dollars.
10. Losing weight is half the job. Keeping if off is the other half.

Thanks for the "real" Thin Commandments! Like I said I was sure the google search was so wrong, glad you found this for us! :hugs:

peanutte 06-13-2013 01:11 PM

Quote:

You know, the lower brain is pretty much our inner toddler---
But why can't I have a cookie!!! I want a cookie now now now!!!!
Just as we don't abuse the child for having childlike wants, we don't need to bash ourselves for having lower brain thoughts. In both cases, we need to handle the 'tantrums' thoughtfully when they arise.
Yes, totally, and here's another thought about that:

Sometimes, when people talk about cheating or off-plan eating, as if they're playing around with the idea of doing it, it sounds like a child who is hanging around the cookie jar--which they have been told is off limits--waiting for Mom to leave the room so they can grab two handfuls of cookies and stuff them in their pockets as fast as they can and run away. It's like the idea of getting away with something becomes more tantalizing than the actual cookies. But really, who's getting away with anything? We're old enough to know better than to get a kick out of being "naughty". Sometimes we really do have to be the "parent" and deal with the "toddler".

Patience 06-13-2013 03:09 PM

Yeah, and who really wants just one cookie?

Where did this idea of indulging ourselves in sweets come from?
The easy answer is childhood, but is it really that?

emel 06-13-2013 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bella (Post 16469293)
Yeah, and who really wants just one cookie?

Where did this idea of indulging ourselves in sweets come from?
The easy answer is childhood, but is it really that?

My husband eats either one Milano or 2 oreos. He's a weirdo.

Beeb 06-13-2013 04:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by emel (Post 16469298)
My husband eats either one Milano or 2 oreos. He's a weirdo.

I think its about "trigger foods", at least for me. I can and have many times eaten only 2 potato chips but give me a pretzel and I done for!! :p:eek: Sugar does the same thing so eat a donut (as example) and it's binge city!!! :mad:

Patience 06-13-2013 05:12 PM

I've heard that there are people like that. :)

We are so different, I wouldn't look twice at a pretzel, but those chips would be another story, especially if salt and vinegar. Better not to each the first one.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:03 PM.