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Old 03-14-2013, 03:34 AM   #31
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I have never had mine checked but I take quite a lot after reading so many reports on how deficient most of us are. I take 4000 iu of vit D3. I am not a doctor though, so you must make your own choice.

It is very difficult to over dose on D. I downloaded a freebie onto my Kindle about it, it convinced me to up my dose to this level.

We all miss the sun so much. I love the sun although I never sunbathe any more....see need to get my vit D.
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:54 AM   #32
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Thank you!
I'm going to try it.

I think JUDDD helps too. I am a 'down' person most of the time, very serious, not a lot of fun to be around, kinda grouchy, probably take life too serious and when I was doing JUDDD really well last year I felt more happy and showed it.
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Old 03-14-2013, 05:16 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbinme View Post
Thank you!
I'm going to try it.

I think JUDDD helps too. I am a 'down' person most of the time, very serious, not a lot of fun to be around, kinda grouchy, probably take life too serious and when I was doing JUDDD really well last year I felt more happy and showed it.
Winter makes so many people sad. One of my kids seems to be sensitive to seasonal depression. His moods are always so much gloomier and he's SO very tired over our long winters. I keep meaning to pick up a light therapy lamp for him to use when getting ready each morning just to see if it helps.

ANYHOO, hugs to you! Hoping the vitamin D is the answer and JUDDD, of course.
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Old 03-14-2013, 05:32 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by b_lou_who View Post
Welcome back home.
One of the nicest things about intermittent fasting for me is that even if you aren't doing rotations regularly, it fits right back into daily life with no notice, no special needs, no "I have to wait until Mondays", or other nonsense that I used to feed myself. And being able to start a new "diet" phase with an up day is awfully pain free


Very wise words!

Welcome back from a relative newbie. I have struggled with hypothyroidism since I was 8 and have had a significant Vit D low reading treated medically and I can tell you firsthand that both of them have a huge impact on moods and general overall health and well being. I take 10,000 units of D per day and that keeps me in a good place on the tested levels. Even though it is a large amount, it is what my body requires. We are so glad that you're back and look forward to hearing how you are doing!

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Old 03-14-2013, 06:44 AM   #35
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I use a spray Vitamin D especially during the winter. During spring and summer I spend extra time outside just basking in the sunlight. As you get older it is harder for the body to use the sun for Vit D hence my supplement. I was diagnosed as low several years ago and got my levels back up strictly with sitting out in the sun everyday so it can be done that way also. I did notice a loss of energy during the time I was low so it certainly can contribute to fatigue. I also exeprience fatigue when I am losing weight. I can tell when the scale is going to drop by how tired and draggy I am. So it could be nothing but getting checked is always a good thing.
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Old 03-14-2013, 07:53 AM   #36
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I take a multivitamin, as well as a calcium/d3 supplement. My endo hasn't tested for vitamin D deficiency, but did ask if I take a supplement. I don't see her again for 6 months, but I think I'll ask to have it tested, as my thyroid labs are all within range, but I still have a constant low-level fatigue. Good information here.

Adi, I wonder, where did you get the spray, and do you feel it's more effective than tablets? TIA!!
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Old 03-14-2013, 10:06 AM   #37
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6 Signs of (SAD) Seasonal Affective Disorder


6 Signs of (SAD) Seasonal Affective Disorder
(from Health.com)

SAD or just sad?
Everyone feels a little melancholy when the days are short and cold. For some people, seasonal change brings with it something more serious than the blues: seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a form of depression that can be debilitating.

And daylight savings time may not help, since darker mornings—in the fall or spring—are particularly difficult for those with SAD.

Mild forms of SAD are believed to affect as many as 20% of people in the United States. If you think you might be one of them, view this slideshow to learn more about the signs of this disorder.

Sadness
SAD is a form of depression, and it shares most of the same symptoms. The two most common symptoms of depression are feelings of sadness and hopelessness, and losing interest in activities—such as socializing—that you normally find pleasurable.

If you experience these symptoms every day for at least two weeks, it’s a sign of depression. If you feel this way only during the fall and winter, and if these symptoms disappear during the rest of the year, it may be a sign of SAD.

Sleepiness and fatigue
People with SAD tend to feel the need to sleep more during the wintertime—sometimes a lot more. In one study, published in the Journal of Psychosomatic Research in 1994, patients at a SAD clinic averaged about 7.5 hours of sleep in the summer, 8.5 hours in the spring and fall, and nearly 10 hours in the winter. Just because you’re sleeping more doesn’t mean you'll feel rested, however. Other research has shown that people with SAD experience more insomnia and sleep disturbances, and are more prone to nodding off at work.

Irritability
Anger and irritability are common—yet often overlooked—symptoms of depression and SAD. Research suggests that people with SAD are significantly more irritable than healthy individuals. They may also be more prone to anger than people with regular (nonseasonal) depression.

A 2006 study that compared groups of people with active SAD and regular depression found that more than 40% of the people in the SAD group experienced sudden fits of inappropriate anger, compared to just 29% in the other group. Those with SAD experienced 19 of these "anger attacks" a month, on average.

Increased appetite
Like depression in general, SAD can increase appetite in some people. Sixty-five percent of people with the disorder report being hungrier during the colder, darker months.

The voracious appetite that sometimes accompanies SAD may be a biological response to a seasonal drop in serotonin, a neurotransmitter that’s associated with mood and helps to control hunger.

Though it can help you feel better temporarily, eating more—and being cooped up—during the winter can really pack on the pounds: Nearly 75% of people with SAD gain weight.

Carb cravings
One of the reasons that people with SAD tend to gain weight is that the disorder can produce a strong craving for complex carbohydrates such as bread and pasta. (In fact, 7 out of 10 people with SAD experience this symptom.)

Gorging on carbohydrates causes the levels of an amino acid called tryptophan to rise in the brain. This in turn causes the release of serotonin, which boosts mood. In effect, people with SAD use carbohydrates as a kind of medication—and a bigger waistline is a common side effect.

Difficulty concentrating
Depression can make you feel sad and alone, but it also compromises how well your brain works. The condition has been shown to affect a range of mental processes, including concentration, speaking ability, and memory.

A 2007 study in theAmerican Journal of Psychiatry showed that this so-called cognitive impairment can be every bit as bad in people with SAD as it is in people with nonseasonal depression. One woman who participated in the study—whose symptoms qualified for SAD, but not major depression—reported that she was having difficulty remembering names and appointments, and was easily distracted.
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Old 03-14-2013, 11:36 AM   #38
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Thanks for posting that, Ann, most interesting. May be worthy of its own thread. What do you think?
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:14 PM   #39
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Thank you for posting that information.
It does sound like its a possibility that I have that. There were some pretty dark times this winter I need to see what I can do to prevent or at least lessen the symptoms next winter. I don't want to waste so much of the year feeling like that. There are times I literally crave the sunlight.
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:12 PM   #40
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Natural Remedies for (SAD) Seasonal Affective Disorder
(Alt medicine about.com)

Here's a look at several natural treatments that may help improve symptoms of seasonal affective disorder:

1) Light Therapy

Because lack of exposure to sunlight is thought to trigger seasonal affective disorder, light therapy is often recommended as a natural treatment for this condition. Light therapy typically involves sitting in front of a light-generating device (called a "light box") for at least 30 minutes each day. However, increasing your exposure to sunlight by spending more time outside or sitting beside a window may also help improve seasonal affective disorder symptoms, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

2) Dietary Supplements

To date, few studies have tested the effectiveness of dietary supplements in natural treatment of seasonal affective disorder. Still, a 2008 research review indicates that running low on vitamin D may be correlated to the onset of seasonal affective disorder. The review also found that a dysfunction in the body's production of melatonin may be associated with seasonal affective disorder. Additionally, a report published in 2007 suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may have a positive effect on people with affective disorders.

If you're considering the use of any dietary supplement in treatment of seasonal affective disorder, make sure to consult your physician before starting your supplement regimen.

3) Stress Management Techniques

Stress management is another natural treatment option for seasonal affective disorder, according to the National Institutes of Health. Indeed, studies show that chronic stress may increase your risk of depressive disorders. In addition to managing your stress triggers, you may want to consider the regular practice of stress reduction techniques like yoga, meditation, guided imagery, and progressive muscle relaxation.
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:52 PM   #41
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Lots of great info. Thanks!
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