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Old 12-20-2011, 02:19 PM   #1
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What Do You Eat In Your Country Or Part Of USA?

We have several members here who live in other countries. I see references to foods/drinks I have never seen or heard of before and would love to know what they are.

Our friends in the UK are drinking hot mugs of Marmite? What is that? And I see other food items I have no idea what they are.

Please tell us, even if you are in the USA and eat things that are a little "different", what you are eating and what it is!

I eat Kimchi. It's fermented Napa cabbage made with red pepper paste, rice vinegar, garlic, green onions, ginger and sweet (sugar sub) water. It is not a USA staple but something Korean that I just love. I also eat Korean rice cakes which are like gummy rice dumplings, but either the size of your pinkie finger, flat quarter sized shapes or little round balls that I put in spicy soup with cabbage, green onions, ginger, garlic and red pepper paste.
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Old 12-20-2011, 02:34 PM   #2
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I'm in the central part of California where we have a lot of migrant farm workers from Mexico, so we eat a lot of "taco truck" staples. My husband loves brain, head, or tongue tacos. I stick with the regular stuff.

We also tend to gravitate to ethnic cuisines when we eat out (which is often) so we eat a lot of Indian curries and sushi as well. You will probably see me putting some weird sounding dishes on the "what are you eating today" threads.
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Old 12-20-2011, 02:54 PM   #3
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This time of year, all the wives of the men DH work with make homemade tamales
I also like pan dulce, which is a lightly sweetened bread usually with a pumpkin filling. Not often, it's pretty carb and calorie dense
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Old 12-20-2011, 03:32 PM   #4
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Haha, I'm from the UK originally and I chuckled when I saw the Marmite references in today's posts! Marmite is something you love or hate. I hate it! It's yeast extract...

Marmite - Love it or hate it

I can't think of anything especially regional right now - although my husband's a New Yorker, so he's ridiculously picky about his pizza! As for me, I still get the occasional urge for digestive biscuits, baked beans or Ribena (all British staples). Luckily, they're all sold in the "international aisle" of my local supermarket

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Old 12-20-2011, 04:37 PM   #5
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Old 12-20-2011, 05:16 PM   #6
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Haha, I'm from the UK originally and I chuckled when I saw the Marmite references in today's posts! Marmite is something you love or hate. I hate it! It's yeast extract...

Marmite - Love it or hate it

I can't think of anything especially regional right now - although my husband's a New Yorker, so he's ridiculously picky about his pizza! As for me, I still get the occasional urge for digestive biscuits, baked beans or Ribena (all British staples). Luckily, they're all sold in the "international aisle" of my local supermarket
ooh it's Vegemite or Promite - I love them! Well diluted with cream cheese lol. Straight up, not so much!
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Old 12-20-2011, 05:27 PM   #7
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Oh man, now I want pan dulce more than anything in the world!

I'm currently living in the midwest and let me tell you, cuisine here is BORING. The seasonings are salt, pepper, and ketchup. The main feeding is hotdish (noodles + meat + can of soup, ketchup optional LOL.)

But I'm from Portland, Oregon, and we have a lot of vegetarians there. I'd say the most common thing to be served there was a plateful of veggies and some sort of creative tofu concoction.

Personally I love anything spicy. Mexican, Thai, Cuban, Indian, it doesn't matter, but I like my food with some HEAT.
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Old 12-20-2011, 10:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeirasMom View Post
My husband loves brain, head, or tongue tacos.
I've never had brain, but tongue and cabeza are delicious!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dottie View Post
This time of year, all the wives of the men DH work with make homemade tamales
One year, my grandma and I made 72 dozen tamales!!!

We made tamales for another family; they gave us a big pot of cabeza, we provided the masa, made the tamales and then got to keep half of them.

I can't think of anything very interesting we eat around here, but it sure is fun to read about y'all's food!
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:49 AM   #9
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I think that Danes eat some 'odd' things, if you are not familiar with them!

To start with, if you are a bread eater, nobody here eats white bread sandwiches. White bread is considered unhealthy and something you only have once in a while in, say, a breakfast bun. The typical bread is a very, very dense dark rye.

And a typical topping for that bread would be leverpostej (liver pate). Also a taste you either love or hate! I really like it now (especially warm with bacon!). I just don't eat it with bread anymore.

The traditional Christmas dinner will be:

Pork roast with crackling (skin)
sauce
potatoes
brown potatoes (the most unhealthy thing I can think of. These are carmelised potatoes...white potatoes literally dripping in sugar.
shredded, stewed red cabbage (sort of tangy. Serves a similar function to cranberry sauce).

For dessert, they will serve a traditional cold rice pudding with almonds and cherry sauce. Tastes great, but what a carb bomb!

The NEXT day (called 2nd Christmas day, or the 25th december) there is a huge Christmas lunch.

They serve the following:
Pickled herring on rye bread
Curried herring on rye bread
fried makrel
smoked or gravad salmon on french bread with honey dijon sauce
Frikadeller (pork meatballs, very traditional. Every kid's favorite and nearly a national dish!)
Homemade liver pate with bacon and mushrooms
Breaded fish filet
Pork tenderloin
Cheese platter (with some stinky cheeses, usually)
some sort of dessert (depends on who hosts).

As you can see, there are many items that are not 'low carb friendly'. I may or may not choose to eat some of these things. Other things are just not 'worth' the indulgence to me, as I don't like the item enough to bother (not having grown up eating it!). Herring would be one of those items!

For the holidays, it is also typical to drink a lot of schnapps. Not the sweet kind you find in the US though....Danes (and Scandinavians generally) drink schnapps made with Dill and other herbs! I find it kind of gross, personally...it tastes like straight vodka with added dill. Ick.

The nice thing that people drink around the holidays is mulled wine! (Gløgg). This is a complicated recipe (sometimes handed down in families) involving red wine, various hard liquors, sugar, mulling spices, almonds and raisins. The mixture is heated and served warm. It is very nice if you are shopping an outdoor Christmas market in the cold!
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:50 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knittering View Post
Oh man, now I want pan dulce more than anything in the world!

I'm currently living in the midwest and let me tell you, cuisine here is BORING. The seasonings are salt, pepper, and ketchup. The main feeding is hotdish (noodles + meat + can of soup, ketchup optional LOL.)

But I'm from Portland, Oregon, and we have a lot of vegetarians there. I'd say the most common thing to be served there was a plateful of veggies and some sort of creative tofu concoction.

Personally I love anything spicy. Mexican, Thai, Cuban, Indian, it doesn't matter, but I like my food with some HEAT.
HA HA!! Funny...I grew up in the midwest, and it was always a big joke to say 'you know you're from Wisconsin (or Minnesota, etc) when Ketchup is a spice!'.
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:53 AM   #11
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Can I also just say, with all of this talk of tamales...I miss Mexican food!! I have a ton of family in the SW and have lived in AZ (my mom lives 30 mins from the border)...and let me tell you that it is next to impossible to find a decent plate of mexican food in Europe (at least in DK). Not that many mexican dishes fit well into my diet, but I still miss them, and so does DH (who has come to love mexican food through our various trips to both the US and Mexico!).
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:57 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Beeb View Post

I eat Kimchi. It's fermented Napa cabbage made with red pepper paste, rice vinegar, garlic, green onions, ginger and sweet (sugar sub) water. It is not a USA staple but something Korean that I just love. I also eat Korean rice cakes which are like gummy rice dumplings, but either the size of your pinkie finger, flat quarter sized shapes or little round balls that I put in spicy soup with cabbage, green onions, ginger, garlic and red pepper paste.
Kimchi is awesome! One of my friends from college is Korean, and when we were in school together, his mom used to invite his friends over for Korean food night . She made the most amazing things! (She is also an awesome lady who I still enjoy talking to!).

Anyhow, she introduced a bunch of us to Korean cuisine, and I am very glad that I had that opportunity. There are so many unique tastes that I've never found anywhere else!

I also had some korean food in Japan (Korean bbq). Wow, I have to say, that was one of the best meals of my life. There were some very untraditional (to my western sensibilities) parts of the animal involved, but I came with an open mind and had a fantastic meal.

Beeb...I seem to remember you saying somewhere that you speak some Korean? Have you been to Korea? I have a feeling there is a fascinating story behind it all...
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Old 12-21-2011, 03:12 AM   #13
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i eat "weird stuff" but i don't think i usually post it.

my faves this time of year:
roti
black cake
jamaican rum cake
puncha creama (this is a drink similar to egg nog, but much better)
sweet bread
callaloo (in trinidad u can get actual callaloo bush but here, we usually use spinach and okra)
stew chicken
pelau (rice and peas)

oh gosh i'm getting hungry.
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Old 12-21-2011, 03:54 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Tyl View Post
i eat "weird stuff" but i don't think i usually post it.

my faves this time of year:
roti
black cake
jamaican rum cake
puncha creama (this is a drink similar to egg nog, but much better)
sweet bread
callaloo (in trinidad u can get actual callaloo bush but here, we usually use spinach and okra)
stew chicken
pelau (rice and peas)

oh gosh i'm getting hungry.
Are you originally from Trinidad and Tobago?
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Old 12-21-2011, 04:52 AM   #15
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Are you originally from Trinidad and Tobago?
nope. first generation American. Both of my parents were born and raised in Trinidad.
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Old 12-21-2011, 06:19 AM   #16
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I love Kimchi!!!

Can't see much we have here that is unusual - but then we eat it - so it isn't!!!
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Old 12-21-2011, 06:19 AM   #17
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Did eat quite a bit of camel in Oman...
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Old 12-21-2011, 07:35 AM   #18
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Okay, now I need to know what black cake and puncha creama are!
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Old 12-21-2011, 08:03 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stardustshadow View Post
I think that Danes eat some 'odd' things, if you are not familiar with them!

To start with, if you are a bread eater, nobody here eats white bread sandwiches. White bread is considered unhealthy and something you only have once in a while in, say, a breakfast bun. The typical bread is a very, very dense dark rye.

And a typical topping for that bread would be leverpostej (liver pate). Also a taste you either love or hate! I really like it now (especially warm with bacon!). I just don't eat it with bread anymore.

The traditional Christmas dinner will be:

Pork roast with crackling (skin)
sauce
potatoes
brown potatoes (the most unhealthy thing I can think of. These are carmelised potatoes...white potatoes literally dripping in sugar.
shredded, stewed red cabbage (sort of tangy. Serves a similar function to cranberry sauce).

For dessert, they will serve a traditional cold rice pudding with almonds and cherry sauce. Tastes great, but what a carb bomb!

The NEXT day (called 2nd Christmas day, or the 25th december) there is a huge Christmas lunch.

They serve the following:
Pickled herring on rye bread
Curried herring on rye bread
fried makrel
smoked or gravad salmon on french bread with honey dijon sauce
Frikadeller (pork meatballs, very traditional. Every kid's favorite and nearly a national dish!)
Homemade liver pate with bacon and mushrooms
Breaded fish filet
Pork tenderloin
Cheese platter (with some stinky cheeses, usually)
some sort of dessert (depends on who hosts).

As you can see, there are many items that are not 'low carb friendly'. I may or may not choose to eat some of these things. Other things are just not 'worth' the indulgence to me, as I don't like the item enough to bother (not having grown up eating it!). Herring would be one of those items!

For the holidays, it is also typical to drink a lot of schnapps. Not the sweet kind you find in the US though....Danes (and Scandinavians generally) drink schnapps made with Dill and other herbs! I find it kind of gross, personally...it tastes like straight vodka with added dill. Ick.

The nice thing that people drink around the holidays is mulled wine! (Gløgg). This is a complicated recipe (sometimes handed down in families) involving red wine, various hard liquors, sugar, mulling spices, almonds and raisins. The mixture is heated and served warm. It is very nice if you are shopping an outdoor Christmas market in the cold!
Things I thought I hated until I couldn't get them here in California:

Dark, dense rye bread
Leverpostej

Funny how you miss things when you can't get them, or only very rarely.

I also really like frikadeller, the sweet red cabbage, medisterpolse, aebleskiver (which I found at Trader Joe's and am making for my daughter's birthday breakfast at school tomorrow), and . . . . GAMMELDANSK for Sunday morning brunches!

We go to Solvang every couple of years in September for "Danish Days." It's a cute, although quite touristy, Danish town in California. We go pretty much for food, wine, and advent candles.
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:02 AM   #20
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There are some great food items on here and I would love (and I'm sure lots of others would, too) to know what they are and what foods are involved in the recipe. Not the recipe, per say, which is always welcomed, but the foods that go into making the dishes you are talking about.

Tyl, I for one would to know some of the food items you are talking about, if you will, please! And Star and Keira, too!!

Last edited by Beeb; 12-21-2011 at 09:11 AM..
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:10 AM   #21
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Kimchi is awesome! One of my friends from college is Korean, and when we were in school together, his mom used to invite his friends over for Korean food night . She made the most amazing things! (She is also an awesome lady who I still enjoy talking to!).

Anyhow, she introduced a bunch of us to Korean cuisine, and I am very glad that I had that opportunity. There are so many unique tastes that I've never found anywhere else!

I also had some korean food in Japan (Korean bbq). Wow, I have to say, that was one of the best meals of my life. There were some very untraditional (to my western sensibilities) parts of the animal involved, but I came with an open mind and had a fantastic meal.

Beeb...I seem to remember you saying somewhere that you speak some Korean? Have you been to Korea? I have a feeling there is a fascinating story behind it all...
I Korean food and go into NYC to Korea Town every chance I can to eat there. Love the BBQ, red bean buns (a sweet rice flour bun with sweet red bean paste inside), spicy rice cakes, and all of the different types of Kimchi, especially the Daikon Radish Kimchi. I'm not a big fish eater, though and tend to lean toward the pork and beef. My Vegan DD loves eating there because of all the vegan/vegetarian dishes they have.

I started watching Korean drama late at night when I was married because I couldn't sleep. I didn't want to wake up the household with the TV sound on and found these dramas (soap operas) are sub-titled. Over the years of watching them, which I still do, I picked up words here and there and on my last birthday my DF gave me Rosetta Stone for Korean. I now know lots of words, and have found a Korean Farm Market right near my house that I can practice what I know with the staff and they are teaching me new words and helping me to correct what I know. It's so much fun, but hard, especially the written words which I don't think I'll EVER master! Sometimes my mouth just doesn't go the way the words need to be formed!

As a matter of fact, DF and I are going to put a Korean couple in traditional wedding attire on top of our wedding cake this time!
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:53 AM   #22
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I Korean food and go into NYC to Korea Town every chance I can to eat there. Love the BBQ, red bean buns (a sweet rice flour bun with sweet red bean paste inside), spicy rice cakes, and all of the different types of Kimchi, especially the Daikon Radish Kimchi. I'm not a big fish eater, though and tend to lean toward the pork and beef. My Vegan DD loves eating there because of all the vegan/vegetarian dishes they have.

I started watching Korean drama late at night when I was married because I couldn't sleep. I didn't want to wake up the household with the TV sound on and found these dramas (soap operas) are sub-titled. Over the years of watching them, which I still do, I picked up words here and there and on my last birthday my DF gave me Rosetta Stone for Korean. I now know lots of words, and have found a Korean Farm Market right near my house that I can practice what I know with the staff and they are teaching me new words and helping me to correct what I know. It's so much fun, but hard, especially the written words which I don't think I'll EVER master! Sometimes my mouth just doesn't go the way the words need to be formed!

As a matter of fact, DF and I are going to put a Korean couple in traditional wedding attire on top of our wedding cake this time!
Cute wedding topper
I think it is SO cool that you learned Korean from watching the soaps Funny enough, I started learning Danish this way, too. When I moved here, I was not allowed to work (had to wait for visa approval, which can take months). We didn't have a lot of money and I was stuck around the house a lot. So I watched television, both danish and American shows with subtitles. By the time my visa was approved and I could start taking language classes, I had learned enough to spring over the first module (there are 5 total for about 1.5 years of instruction). I think it is a great way to start language learning, and much more effective than just using a book!

Do you like Rosetta stone? I have heard good things about the program!

Now I want some Korean barbeque! he he...
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:58 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by KeirasMom View Post
Things I thought I hated until I couldn't get them here in California:

Dark, dense rye bread
Leverpostej

Funny how you miss things when you can't get them, or only very rarely.

I also really like frikadeller, the sweet red cabbage, medisterpolse, aebleskiver (which I found at Trader Joe's and am making for my daughter's birthday breakfast at school tomorrow), and . . . . GAMMELDANSK for Sunday morning brunches!

We go to Solvang every couple of years in September for "Danish Days." It's a cute, although quite touristy, Danish town in California. We go pretty much for food, wine, and advent candles.
LOL Gammeldansk My father in law had me try that stuff after I first moved here, and then, seeing that I could 'handle it', said that I had passed my integration test

Of course, Æbleskriver! I have forgotten about them LOL! Must be my low carbiness talking there! (for those who are unfamiliar with them, they are more or less pancake balls. They are served with powdered sugar and jam on top, usually hot and WITH that mulled wine!).

Frikadeller are danish meatballs. They are made with a combo of ground pork and ground veal, onions, and of course flour, breadcrumbs, eggs, sparkling water, and salt and pepper. Every family has their own recipe, and sometimes people add things like carrots to them. They are very good but I hate making them because it takes forever and makes my house smell like meatballs
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Old 12-21-2011, 09:59 AM   #24
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I think I want some puncha creama

I love egg nog...and would really like to try something that is apparently EVEN BETTER!
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:01 PM   #25
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The nice thing that people drink around the holidays is mulled wine! (Gløgg). This is a complicated recipe (sometimes handed down in families) involving red wine, various hard liquors, sugar, mulling spices, almonds and raisins. The mixture is heated and served warm. It is very nice if you are shopping an outdoor Christmas market in the cold!
We have that here in Germany too, it's called glühwein. We also have something similar that is called feuerzangenbowle which is even better. It's made by dousing a big sugar cone in high proof rum and setting it on fire above the red wine mixture so the flaming sugar drips in. We also have eier punsch which is Germany's version of egg nog. It's orange, absolutely nothing like egg nog, and it has amaretto in it. All are delicious warm drinks that are served outside at winter markets
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Old 12-21-2011, 12:45 PM   #26
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We have that here in Germany too, it's called glühwein. We also have something similar that is called feuerzangenbowle which is even better. It's made by dousing a big sugar cone in high proof rum and setting it on fire above the red wine mixture so the flaming sugar drips in. We also have eier punsch which is Germany's version of egg nog. It's orange, absolutely nothing like egg nog, and it has amaretto in it. All are delicious warm drinks that are served outside at winter markets
They sound fabulous!! I keep meaning to go to Germany for a Christmas market some December (it is so easy to do from here!) but I never seem to have the time and/or money!
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:31 PM   #27
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I think I want some puncha creama

I love egg nog...and would really like to try something that is apparently EVEN BETTER!

i love egg nog too. i bought some low cal egg nog the other day and enjoyed it much. no puncha creama till i get to houston... i cannot wait. (it eggs, condensed milk, evaporated milk, rum, spices... )

http://www.trinigourmet.com/index.php/punch-de-creme/
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:33 PM   #28
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Okay, now I need to know what black cake and puncha creama are!
black cake it like a trini fruit cake but wayyyyyyyyyyyy better. you soak the fruits in wine for as long as you can, we usually start soaking our fruits around thanksgiving. then when the cake is baked you soak the entire thing in wine. its soooooooooooooooooooooooooo amazing! i love it!
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:35 PM   #29
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Ohhh, thanks for the link...that sounds sooo fabulous!
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:37 PM   #30
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i eat "weird stuff" but i don't think i usually post it.

my faves this time of year:
roti i usually describe this to american's as an indian tortilla filled with curried meat--chicken, goat, beef, etc with chick peas and potatoes...yum
black cake
jamaican rum cake
puncha creama (this is a drink similar to egg nog, but much better)
sweet bread
callaloo (in trinidad u can get actual callaloo bush but here, we usually use spinach and okra) we blend spinach and okra with coconut milk and spices, serve over rice, in trinidad you would skip the spinach and just use callaloo bush
stew chicken
pelau (rice and peas)

oh gosh i'm getting hungry.
still hungry i will have all of this available at christmas!
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