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Old 10-18-2011, 07:31 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by SoHappy View Post
But someone commented that they'd rather be healthy and overweight than skinny and sick.

It would be nicest, though, to be a healthy weight and Healthy to boot!!
Definitely. Although I feel I've gotten a lot of health benefits from the weight loss itself (ie, lowered heart rate) that didn't come with just a healthy diet. I suppose because the added fat is a store house of unhealthy things. Certainly I've noticed positive changes in my TOMs, as well as much fewer SI joint pain attacks, lasting shorter times.

Now to get the last fat off....burn fat, burn!
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Old 10-20-2011, 08:53 AM   #32
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Insulin Pathway Component Explains Insulin Resistance, Age-associated Metabolic Syndrome
Main Category: Diabetes
Also Included In: Genetics; Cardiovascular / Cardiology
Article Date: 10 Aug 2006 - 9:00 PDT

Metabolic syndrome, an aging-associated group of disorders that includes insulin resistance, heart disease and high lipid levels, may be treatable thanks to a newly discovered role for a regulatory gene, according to a team of scientists at the Burnham Institute for Medical Research.

In addition, the scientists found that this single gene may contribute to the body's responses to caloric restriction and may explain some aspects of the Atkins Diet.

The gene's new function was discovered in Drosophila fruit flies; previously it was associated solely with the control of growth. Until now, how the gene regulates insulin, as well as other symptoms of metabolic syndrome, was largely unknown. The study was conducted by Sean Oldham, Ph.D., assistant professor, and his colleagues at the Burnham and the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse. Oldham's findings appear in the journal Cell Metabolism to be released on August 8th.

Using fruit flies bred with a newly created mutant form of the gene TOR (short for target of rapamycin), Oldham and his colleagues were able to determine how the TOR pathway interacted with other important regulators of insulin, glucose and lipid metabolism.

TOR is an ancient gene, found in nearly all animal and plant cells. The researchers discovered that their new mutant fly reduced TOR function, allowing them to observe what happens when TOR's influence is removed.

Reductions in TOR function lowered glucose and lipid levels in the body. They also blocked the function of another important insulin regulator, a factor called FOXO, which is known to be a critical mediator of insulin signals and therefore glucose and lipid metabolism. In addition, flies with the mutated form of TOR had longer life spans than control flies.

"It has been unclear how TOR signaling affects the insulin pathway," said Oldham. "Our study adds another dimension to TOR's activity by revealing unexpected and novel levels of beneficial regulation of insulin metabolism, by reducing insulin resistance. This study provides the first details of how TOR may regulate energy homeostasis and responses to aging, in particular the coordination of weight reduction effects caused by caloric restriction and, in humans, it may explain the effects of the Atkins diet. It suggests that reducing TOR function could lead to a possible treatment for any or all symptoms of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance."

Oldham's group, in collaboration with Dr. Rolf Bodmer at Burnham, showed that reducing TOR function also blocks the age-dependent decline of heart function, providing a partial explanation for why excess calories from overeating can lead to resistance to insulin's ability to process sugars and may contribute to reduced heart function.

Dr. Oldham and his colleagues are continuing their search to understand how TOR mediates caloric restriction, aging and other effects on insulin signaling and metabolism. They want to understand TOR's role in the relationship between growth, metabolism and aging, both in healthy individuals and individuals with metabolic diseases. The researchers also are screening possible drugs that could treat metabolic syndrome by reducing TOR function.

"This study provides the first direct evidence that reducing TOR function could be clinically beneficial to counter insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes," said Oldham. "We believe further studies on fruit flies are invaluable to discovering more details about this pathway, and will give us indispensable insight into pathological aspects of aging and senescence."


came from Medical News Today.
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Started JUDDD 10/12/11 after LC.
MAINTENANCE since 11/12/11, & have lost more weight. I shake things up all the time with my version of Pirate Jenny's MUDDD, my "Fast 5" & other IF. ...low-moderate fat....and eating "healthy" foods 75+% of the time which lets me have real life and indulgences too I've reached my goals, improved my health & appearance, and enjoy my lifetime woe!

Last edited by sophiethecat; 10-20-2011 at 08:57 AM..
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Old 10-20-2011, 09:02 AM   #33
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Life-extending secrets of calorie restriction
Main Category: Biology / Biochemistry
Article Date: 01 Jan 2004 - 0:00 PDT

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.(USA)--Shedding light on why drastically restricting calorie intake prolongs life span in some organisms, MIT researchers report in the Jan. 1 issue of Genes & Development that lowering the level of a common coenzyme activates an anti-aging gene in yeast.

Calorie restriction extends life span in a wide spectrum of organisms, and has been shown to delay the onset or reduce the incidence of many age-related diseases, including cancer and diabetes. No one is sure why it works.

MIT Biology Professor Leonard P. Guarente discovered in 2000 that calorie restriction activates the silenced information regulator (SIR2) gene, which has the apparent ability to slow aging during the low-calorie diet.

This gene makes a protein called Sir2, which is normally activated by the coenzyme molecule NAD. Guarente has shown that SIR2 is integrally tied to extending life span in yeast and in the roundworm. Humans carry a similar gene.

This latest study probes how Sir2 is activated by calorie restriction. The authors report that a coenzyme related to NAD, called NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) inhibits Sir2 by blocking the action of NAD. During calorie restriction, levels of NADH decline in cells. This decrease in NADH allows NAD to better activate Sir2 and thereby extend life span.

'These findings provide a simple model for activation of Sir2 and extension of life span by calorie restriction,' the authors write.

'Our findings suggest that the NAD/NADH ratio can serve a critical regulatory function, determining the life span of yeast mother cells. A reduction in this nucleotide activates Sir2 to extend the life span in calorie restriction.'

In previous research, Guarente found that rather than a slower metabolism leading to a slower rate of respiration, it turns out that respiration in yeast cells under calorie restriction goes up, not down.

'A high respiration rate is intimately connected with calorie restriction in yeast,' he said. 'A high respiration rate activates SIR2. When respiration goes up, NADH goes down and SIR2 goes up. When SIR2 goes up, longevity happens.'

NADH, a coenzyme or enzyme helper, is present in all living cells. (An enzyme is a protein that works like a catalyst in the body to prompt chemical changes; for instance, turning food into energy.) NADH, an activated form of the B vitamin niacin, helps produce energy through a series of chemical reactions in the cell.

In cells, NADH stimulates the production of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), a compound that represents chemical energy in cells. The more NADH a cell has, the more stored energy it has. It remains to be seen whether these findings about yeast and NADH will relate to the extension of life span in mammals by calorie restriction.

In addition to Guarente, authors include Su-Ju Lin, now at the University of California at Davis; Ethan Ford, MIT postdoctoral associate in biology; Marcia Haigis, MIT postdoctoral fellow in biology; and MIT biology graduate student Gregory B. Liszt.

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Ellison Medical Foundation, the Seaver Institute and the Howard and Linda Stern Fund.


from Medical News Today.
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Old 10-20-2011, 09:04 AM   #34
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Calorie Restriction Appears Better Than Exercise At Slowing Primary Aging
Main Category: Nutrition / Diet
Also Included In: Seniors / Aging; Sports Medicine / Fitness
Article Date: 01 Jun 2006 - 0:00 PDT

Investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that eating a low-calorie yet nutritionally balanced diet lowers concentrations of a thyroid hormone called triiodothyronine (T3), which controls the body's energy balance and cellular metabolism.

The researchers also found that calorie restriction (CR) decreases the circulating concentration of a powerful inflammatory molecule called tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF). They say the combination of lower T3 levels and reduced inflammation may slow the aging process by reducing the body's metabolic rate as well as oxidative damage to cells and tissues.

Previous research on mice and rats has shown that both calorie restriction and endurance exercise protect them against many chronic diseases including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer. However, the research has shown that only CR increases the animals' maximum lifespan by up to 50 percent. These animal studies suggest that leanness is a key factor in the prevention of age-associated disease, but reducing caloric intake is needed to slow down aging.

For the new study, researchers examined 28 members of the Calorie Restriction Society who had been eating a CR diet for an average of six years. Although the CR group consumed fewer calories -- averaging only about 1,800 per day -- they consumed at least 100 percent of the recommended daily amounts of protein and micronutrients. A second group of 28 study subjects was sedentary, and they ate a standard Western diet. A third group in the study ate a standard Western diet -- approximately 2,700 calories per day -- but also did endurance training. The researchers found reduced T3 levels -- similar to those seen in animals whose rate of aging is reduced by CR -- only in the people on CR diets.

But their serum concentrations of two other hormones -- thyroxin (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) -- were normal, indicating that those on CR were not suffering from the thyroid disease of clinical hypothyroidism. The findings are published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Interestingly, body fat levels did not affect serum T3 concentrations. The people in the CR group and the endurance athletes had similar amounts and composition of body fat. But although the CR group had lower T3 levels, the exercise group had T3 levels closer to those seen in the sedentary people who ate a standard Western diet.

"The difference in T3 levels between the CR group and the exercise group is exciting because it suggests that CR has some specific anti-aging effects that are due to lower energy intake, rather than to leanness," says first author Luigi Fontana, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine at Washington University in St. Louis and an investigator at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome, Italy. "These findings suggest that although exercise helps prevent problems that can cut life short -- such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease -- only CR appears also to have an impact on primary aging."


from Medical News Today.
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Old 10-20-2011, 08:57 PM   #35
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The content below is a summary of the original peer reviewed research, compiled by FYI Living's health writers.
Home > Body > Intense Calorie Restriction Helps Fight Type 2 Diabetes
Intense Calorie Restriction Helps Fight Type 2 Diabetes
By FYI Health Writer on Jul 21, 2011

Summary
Type 2 diabetes is known to be relentless and progressive, resulting in complete and irreversible failure of insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. This study attempted to investigate whether calorie restrictions can prevent and reverse the failure of beta cells. Insulin resistance is an important marker of type 2 diabetes. This study thus evaluated whether insulin resistance could also be reversed through dietary modifications. The results showed that diet restriction could successfully reduce the blood sugar after a week of commencement. It was also noted that liver triacylglycerol levels decreased through diet restriction, while the sensitivity to insulin increased.
Health Poll

Introduction
It is known from scientific evidence that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder, and may eventually lead to failure of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Studies have shown that nearly half of the patients with type 2 diabetes suffer from failure of the beta cells after 10 years of the disease, thereby needing insulin supplementation through daily injections. Patients with type 2 diabetes are susceptible to the development of resistance to insulin. This means that their bodies are not able to function normally at optimum levels of insulin, and require higher levels of it, which is administered through injections. This study attempted to see if diet restrictions could create a negative balance in energy that may reverse insulin resistance and beta cell damage in those suffering from type 2 diabetes.

Methodology
* For this study, 11 patients with type 2 diabetes (nine men and two women) were selected. The average age of all the participants was 49.5 years and all of them were reported to be obese after an assessment of their height, weight and body mass index. Eight healthy individuals were chosen as controls.
* The participants were given a restrictive diet of 600 calories per day and were assessed after the first, fourth, and eighth week from the start of this diet.
* Parameters like blood sugar, total glucose output from the liver, insulin sensitivity, and functions of the beta cells were measured. Using Dixon magnetic resonance imaging, levels of triacylglycerol were measured from both the liver and the pancreas.

Key findings
* It was found that after a week of diet restriction, the levels of blood sugar decreased from an average of 9.2 to 5.9 mmol/l in the patients with type 2 diabetes.
* The results also revealed that the glucose output from the liver was suppressed, indicating improvement in insulin sensitivity from an average of 43 to 74 percent in patients with diabetes, and 68 percent in the non-diabetics.
* Levels of triacylglycerol in the liver fell from an average of 12.9 to 2.9 percent in diabetics after the eighth week of study. Similarly, triacylglycerol levels in the pancreas fell by an average of 8 to 6.2 percent.
* Furthermore, sensitivity to insulin rose in both the diabetics and non-diabetics. The maximum response to insulin was seen at after the eighth week of study.

Next steps/Shortcomings
A very small sample of participants was studied and further trials on a larger population are necessary to derive conclusions that are more concrete. The participants were mostly those who had developed diabetes within four years prior to the study. Thus, the extent of damage to the beta cells may not have been adequate. Further studies with longer standing diabetics may provide a clearer picture. In addition, the participants were allowed to return to their normal diet at the end of 12 weeks. The effect of this return on the insulin sensitivity and blood sugar parameters should be considered in future studies.

Conclusion
This is the first study to show that damage to beta cells and decrease in insulin sensitivity can be reversed by severe calorie restrictions in the diet. The change is associated with the lowering of triacylglycerol levels in the liver and pancreas. The authors of this study speculate that this study will help in a proper assessment of the exact pathology of type 2 diabetes, allowing researchers to understand the cause of insulin resistance in populations. According to the authors, this study “carries major implications for information to be given to newly diagnosed patients, who should know that they have a potentially reversible condition and not one that is inevitably progressive.”

For More Information:
Reversal of Type 2 Diabetes: Normalization of Beta Cell Function in Association with Decreased Pancreas and Liver Triacylglycerol
Publication Journal: Diabetologia, June 2011
By E. L. Lim; K. G. Hollingsworth; Newcastle University, Newcastle, England

*FYI Living Lab Reports Are Summaries of the Original Research.
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Old 10-21-2011, 05:54 AM   #36
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Modulation of cutaneous aging with calorie restriction in Fischer 344 rats: a histological study.
Bhattacharyya TK, Merz M, Thomas JR.
Source

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. tbhatt@uic.edu
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether histological changes in skin owing to intrinsic aging in a laboratory rodent model are modulated by caloric restriction (CR).
METHODS:

The abdominal skin from colony-raised ad libitum-fed Fischer 344 rats and age-matched rats subjected to CR was studied in the light microscope using histological morphometric methods. Animals 4, 12, and 24 months or older were used in this study. We studied the skin to obtain (1) quantitative data on the depth of the epidermis, dermis, and fat layer, the epidermal cellular density, the percentage fraction of dermal collagen, elastic fibers, pilosebaceous units, and capillaries, and the fibroblast density; and (2) qualitative assessment of histological staining for dermal glycosaminoglycans. We analyzed data by means of general linear model 2-way analysis of variance to obtain significance for the effects of age, diet, and age-diet interaction.
RESULTS:

The ad libitum-fed rats showed age-related increase in the depth of the epidermis, dermis, and fat layer. Calorie restriction prevented these changes, but epidermal nuclear density appeared to be stimulated. A trend toward increased values for collagen and elastic fibers, fibroblasts, and capillaries in skin samples from CR rats was observed. Pilosebaceous units were not modified. Moderately reduced staining for the dermal glycosaminoglycans in the skin of CR rats was noticed.
CONCLUSIONS:

Histomorphological changes resulting from intrinsic aging affected some of the studied variables in the rat skin, and these changes were delayed or prevented by CR. Some stimulatory effects, such as increased densities of fibroblasts and capillary profiles and higher values of connective tissue fibers resulting from CR, were also observed. Cutaneous morphological changes due to natural aging in this rat model seem to be modified by physiological or metabolic alterations imposed by CR.

PMID:
15655168
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:01 AM   #37
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Cutaneous morphological changes due to natural aging in this rat model seem to be modified by physiological or metabolic alterations imposed by CR.
How shallow am I that this is my favorite study!

Loving that the rats maintained their youthful skin.
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:07 AM   #38
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How shallow am I that this is my favorite study!

Loving that the rats maintained their youthful skin.
Yes!!! If good skin is another side effect of CR & JUDDD then that's a huge motivator for me!!

Since my insulin resistance caused acne and JUDDD is healing the IR, I'm breaking out less and less. I thought LC was going to clear me up at first, but then I continued breaking out around my jawline/neck, around my mouth, especially certain times of month. Not as bad as before LC certainly, but it was still happening some and leaving scars.

I'm over a week into JUDDD and I wake up with smooth skin that doesn't have a coating of oil anymore! I think my skin's tone and texture just looks a little better too.
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:15 AM   #39
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I think my skin's tone and texture just looks a little better too.
That's excellent news! Congrats!
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Old 10-21-2011, 08:36 AM   #40
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I am loving these articles. Thanks for posting.

And that *youthful skin* one??? Ummmm.... that one takes on even more significance when you're my age. Darn! Too late!
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Old 10-22-2011, 04:53 PM   #41
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I am loving these articles. Thanks for posting.

And that *youthful skin* one??? Ummmm.... that one takes on even more significance when you're my age. Darn! Too late!
Hope I look half as good as you do at your age, Pat!

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Old 10-22-2011, 04:55 PM   #42
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Hope I look half as good as you do at your age, Pat!

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Thanks, Hon, but the trick is to stand far away from the camera!

But as young and beautiful as you are looking still at 40, you will be one of those who surprise people at all ages, always looking many years younger than you truly are.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:27 PM   #43
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Found this info in an article called "The Health Benefits of Fasting" by Will Carroll. I thought it was interesting and would be good motivation for our DDs too

The benefits of fasting must be preceded by a look at the body's progression when deprived of food. Due to the lack of incoming energy, the body must turn to its own resources, a function called autolysis. (2) Autolysis is the breaking down of fat stores in the body in order to produce energy. The liver is in charge of converting the fats into a chemical called a ketone body, "the metabolic substances acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid" (3), and then distributing these bodies throughout the body via the blood stream. "When this fat utilization occurs, free fatty acids are released into the blood stream and are used by the liver for energy." (3) The less one eats, the more the body turns to these stored fats and creates these ketone bodies, the accumulation of which is referred to as ketosis. (4)

I admit, I don't know as much about what actually goes on in the body during our DD when we are fasting or close to it (eating hundreds of calories instead of the usual thousands). I want to learn though.

I am having a near fasting DD so far today, and I find I don't have much appetite yet I feel good emotionally and mentally. I wonder if that has to do with the last sentence above - that the less one eats during a fasting day (DD) the more ketones and body goes into ketosis and appetite is suppressed?

I'm still under 100 calories for the day and it's going on 6 p.m.

An odd thing started happening about 4:30 p.m. or so. It seemed like my sinuses opened up and I could breathe a little better through my nose. I started feeling a bit "euphoric" though I don't think that's quite right - "pleasantly alert" might be a better description.

My skin had been breaking out for the last couple days due to several things (Halloween candy, too much wine, hormone, etc.) but it not only feels like it's calming down but looks almost "luminous" in the mirror this evening despite the remains of the before-active pimples.

I have a feeling my immune system is benefiting from this near-fast today and that inflammation is calming.

Last edited by sophiethecat; 11-05-2011 at 02:40 PM..
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Old 11-06-2011, 07:31 AM   #44
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I'm going to attempt to eat that way on my next DD too - try to keep the calories real low for at least 16 hours (like if I went to bed at midnight on UD, then try not to eat much until after 4 p.m. on the DD).

It was amazing how I could FEEL the inflammation from my past days' excesses calming down.
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Old 11-06-2011, 11:22 AM   #45
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I'm going to attempt to eat that way on my next DD too - try to keep the calories real low for at least 16 hours (like if I went to bed at midnight on UD, then try not to eat much until after 4 p.m. on the DD).

It was amazing how I could FEEL the inflammation from my past days' excesses calming down.
The JUDDD plan pretty much has the benefits of Fasting built into it just naturally. If you follow the plan.

At the time of evening when you cease eating on your UD, you begin your fast. You will be fasted during that night, you will be fasting the entire length of your DD, and you will be continuing in the fasted state until you finally wake and eat for the first meal on your following UD.

For many JUDDDers, that Down Day time is a duration of 34, 35, 36 hours of fasting time on only 500 or so calories..... considered very much a fast! You're enduring a nighttime and DD daytime and another nighttime, all in the fasting state.

That is found to be enough to trigger the health benefits of true fasting. And is dynamite for weight loss when it's combined with a reasonable Up Day of eating.

I think if you follow the JUDDD plan, you will find the benefits to health will, in the end, outweigh even the weight loss of it all!
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Old 11-06-2011, 07:49 PM   #46
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I posted here once that an old study using about 120 people in a retirement home
found some of these health benifits with NO NET calorie restriction. There UD was
150% of there normal calories and there DD was 50% normal calories. Over a 3 year
period the 60 people on the plan only had about 1/2 the days in a hospital as the
60 people in the controle group.
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Old 11-07-2011, 12:21 PM   #47
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Same thing happened today, another DD I fell asleep about 11 p.m. last night, but I'd stopped eating at least an hour before that. Anyway, around 2 p.m. this afternoon, I had that sensation again of my sinus passages clearing up (I haven't taken any allergy meds today) and that "pleasantly alert" feeling in my mind and body.

I'd been on JUDDD eating for 24 days when I first noticed this. (It was on Saturday's DD that I noticed it).
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:56 PM   #48
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SOOOO happy I came back to this website and found all you wonderful JUDDD people!! I've been discussing my stall on another thread all night--but decided to come in here and read some more.

I have been low carbing on and off for about 10 years, and keep losing and gaining back the same 15 pounds (I actually have about 35 to lose). Every time I start an LC diet the correct way, I lose VERY quickly. My body has always responded very well to LC. However, I have recently realized that I cannot keep eating LC--I've just gotten sick of it all, and JUDDD seems like a WOE that I should be able to maintain for the rest of my life. I also think the health benefits are very important. I cannot tell you how much happier I am to be able to cook healthy meals and not worry about how many carbs are in them. I think I just OD'd on LC.

I want to thank each and every one of you for posting on all these threads and encouraging and teaching people like me--who need it!!
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Old 11-08-2011, 05:47 AM   #49
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Adult-onset calorie restriction and fasting delay spontaneous tumorigenesis in p53-deficient mice.

Berrigan D, Perkins SN, Haines DC, et al.

Carcinogenesis. 2002 May; 23(5):817-22.

Heterozygous p53-deficient (p53(+/-)) mice, a potential model for human Li-Fraumeni Syndrome, have one functional allele of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. These mice are prone to spontaneous neoplasms, most commonly sarcoma and lymphoma; the median time to death of p53+/- mice is 18 months. We have shown previously that juvenile-onset calorie restriction (CR) to 60% of ad libitum (AL) intake delays tumor development in young p53-null (-/-) mice by a p53-independent and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)-related mechanism. To determine whether CR is effective when started in adult p53-deficient mice, and to compare chronic CR with an intermittent fasting regimen, male p53+/- mice (7-10 months old, 31-32 mice/group) were randomly assigned to the following regimens: (i) AL (AIN-76A diet), (ii) CR to 60% of AL intake or (iii) 1 day/week fast. Food availability on non-fasting days was controlled to prevent compensatory over feeding. Relative to the AL group, CR significantly delayed (P = 0.001) the onset of tumors in adult mice, whereas the 1 day/week fast caused a moderate delay (P = 0.039). Substantial variation in longevity and maximum body weight within treatments was not correlated with variation in growth characteristics of individual mice. In a separate group of p53+/- mice treated for 4 weeks (n = five mice per treatment), plasma IGF-1 levels in CR versus AL mice were reduced by 20% (P < 0.01) and leptin levels were reduced by 71% (P < 0.01); fasted mice had intermediate levels of leptin and IGF-1. Our findings that CR or a 1 day/week fast suppressed carcinogenesis-even when started late in life in mice predestined to develop tumors due to decreased p53 gene dosage-support efforts to identify suitable interventions influencing energy balance in humans as a tool for cancer prevention
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Old 11-08-2011, 05:52 AM   #50
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pjsam, that's what I like the best. This isn't a deprivation diet. You can eat anything you want - no rules about the kinds of foods. You only have to limit the amount. That's what makes it so healthy and so normal. Never have to say "oh, I can't, I'm on a diet." Worst case senario now is "oh, let me take a piece of that cake home. I'll eat it tomorrow."

So much of what makes life worth living involves food. All the holidays, picnics, dinner with friends, etc. On a regular CR diet you miss it all and try to convince yourself that you are better for it. But it never feels that way, does it? It always feels like you're missing the fun. But you tell yourself that when the diet is over you'll be able to eat all that stuff again. Which, I think, is setting you up for regaining again....and all before you've even lost the weight in the first place.

I think JUDDD IS a WOE designed to be a lifelong change. What makes it livable is that you never deprive yourself....only delay....and only that on 3 days a week!

Candy? Regular CR diets tell you NEVER!!! JUDDD says if you want to eat all 1800 calories (or whatever) in candy, your choice. So, if I get that chocolate craving, that's fine. No guilt! Enjoy. After all, never is a long time!!
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:35 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjsam1156 View Post
SOOOO happy I came back to this website and found all you wonderful JUDDD people!! I've been discussing my stall on another thread all night--but decided to come in here and read some more.

I have been low carbing on and off for about 10 years, and keep losing and gaining back the same 15 pounds (I actually have about 35 to lose). Every time I start an LC diet the correct way, I lose VERY quickly. My body has always responded very well to LC. However, I have recently realized that I cannot keep eating LC--I've just gotten sick of it all, and JUDDD seems like a WOE that I should be able to maintain for the rest of my life. I also think the health benefits are very important. I cannot tell you how much happier I am to be able to cook healthy meals and not worry about how many carbs are in them. I think I just OD'd on LC.

I want to thank each and every one of you for posting on all these threads and encouraging and teaching people like me--who need it!!
Glad you're here with us, PJ! And that we all get to enjoy the holidays with real, regular foods! Yes, to me the health benefits are the main thing - and now I can do CR without doing it everyday - maybe 3 x week on JUDDD!
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Old 11-10-2011, 11:10 AM   #52
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Not sure if this one is posted, but it may help explain why my waist/hip ratio is improving - when 75 pounds of earlier weight loss did nothing for it. And I'm keeping my precious booty from disappearing...

Alternate-day fasting reduces the ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat by modulating adipose tissue triglyceride metabolism in mice -- Varady et al. 22 (1): 882.1 -- The FASEB Journal
Alternate-day fasting reduces the ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat by modulating adipose tissue triglyceride metabolism in mice
Krista A Varady, DJ Roohk, Madhav Vissa and Marc Hellerstein

Nutritional Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Calorie restriction (CR) regimens reduce visceral adiposity in non-obese animals. The effects of alternate-day fasting (ADF) regimens on fat distribution are not known.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of ADF on body fat distribution in mice, and to determine the lipid dynamics underlying redistribution of fat among depots.

METHODS: In a 2-week study, 24 male C57BL/6J mice were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: ADF-100% (24 h of 100% CR, alternating with 24 h ad libitum feeding) or control (ad libitum fed everyday).

RESULTS: Body weight did not differ between groups. The epidydimal (visceral) fat depot of the ADF-100% group was 31% smaller (P < 0.01), while the inguinal (subcutaneous) fat depot was 45% larger (P < 0.01), compared to controls. Absolute TG synthesis in the ADF-100% group was higher (P < 0.05) in inguinal fat and lower (P < 0.05) in epidydimal fat than in controls. No differences in net lipolysis were observed between groups in either fat pad. Net TG accumulation in ADF-100% mice was higher (P < 0.05) in inguinal fat and lower (P < 0.05) in epidydimal fat, relative to controls. Epidydimal fat cells were 56% smaller (P < 0.05) in the ADF-100% group, post-treatment, relative to controls.

CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that short-term ADF redistributes adipose TG from visceral to subcutaneous depots by augmenting TG synthesis in inguinal fat, while lowering it in epidydimal fat.
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Old 11-10-2011, 12:00 PM   #53
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Thanks for posting that, Paula!!

Glad you're getting the result you want with the losing of inches!
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Old 11-10-2011, 12:01 PM   #54
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Woo Hoo, Paula!!!!!!!!!!

And thanks for posting the study too. Very interesting.
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Old 11-11-2011, 07:11 PM   #55
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The effect on health of alternate day calorie restriction: Eating less and more than needed on alternate days prolongs life

James B. Johnson, Corresponding Author Contact Information, E-mail The Corresponding Author, Donald R. Laubb, Sujit Johnc
Purchase
a Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University Medical Center, 2547A Lyon Street, 2nd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94123, United States
b Department of Surgery, Stanford Medical School, Stanford, CA, United States
c Department of Mathematics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, United States

Received 9 January 2006; Accepted 16 January 2006. Available online 10 March 2006.

Summary

Restricting caloric intake to 60–70% of normal adult weight maintenance requirement prolongs lifespan 30–50% and confers near perfect health across a broad range of species. Every other day feeding produces similar effects in rodents, and profound beneficial physiologic changes have been demonstrated in the absence of weight loss in ob/ob mice. Since May 2003 we have experimented with alternate day calorie restriction, one day consuming 20–50% of estimated daily caloric requirement and the next day ad lib eating, and have observed health benefits starting in as little as two weeks, in insulin resistance, asthma, seasonal allergies, infectious diseases of viral, bacterial and fungal origin (viral URI, recurrent bacterial tonsillitis, chronic sinusitis, periodontal disease), autoimmune disorder (rheumatoid arthritis), osteoarthritis, symptoms due to CNS inflammatory lesions (Tourette’s, Meniere’s) cardiac arrhythmias (PVCs, atrial fibrillation), menopause related hot flashes. We hypothesize that other many conditions would be delayed, prevented or improved, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, brain injury due to thrombotic stroke atherosclerosis, NIDDM, congestive heart failure.

Our hypothesis is supported by an article from 1957 in the Spanish medical literature which due to a translation error has been construed by several authors to be the only existing example of calorie restriction with good nutrition. We contend for reasons cited that there was no reduction in calories overall, but that the subjects were eating, on alternate days, either 900 calories or 2300 calories, averaging 1600, and that body weight was maintained. Thus they consumed either 56% or 144% of daily caloric requirement. The subjects were in a residence for old people, and all were in perfect health and over 65. Over three years, there were 6 deaths among 60 study subjects and 13 deaths among 60 ad lib-fed controls, non-significant difference. Study subjects were in hospital 123 days, controls 219, highly significant difference. We believe widespread use of this pattern of eating could impact influenza epidemics and other communicable diseases by improving resistance to infection. In addition to the health effects, this pattern of eating has proven to be a good method of weight control, and we are continuing to study the process in conjunction with the NIH.
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Old 11-11-2011, 07:17 PM   #56
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American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 81, No. 1, 69-73, January 2005

Alternate-day fasting in nonobese subjects: effects on body weight, body composition, and energy metabolism1,2
Leonie K Heilbronn, Steven R Smith, Corby K Martin, Stephen D Anton and Eric Ravussin
1 From the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA.

Background: Prolonged dietary restriction increases the life span in rodents. Some evidence suggests that alternate-day fasting may also prolong the life span.

Objective: Our goal was to determine whether alternate-day fasting is a feasible method of dietary restriction in nonobese humans and whether it improves known biomarkers of longevity.

Design: Nonobese subjects (8 men and 8 women) fasted every other day for 22 d. Body weight, body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), respiratory quotient (RQ), temperature, fasting serum glucose, insulin, free fatty acids, and ghrelin were assessed at baseline and after 21 d (12-h fast) and 22 d (36-h fast) of alternate-day fasting. Visual analogue scales were used to assess hunger weekly.

Results: Subjects lost 2.5 ± 0.5% of their initial body weight (P < 0.001) and 4 ± 1% of their initial fat mass (P < 0.001). Hunger increased on the first day of fasting and remained elevated (P < 0.001). RMR and RQ did not change significantly from baseline to day 21, but RQ decreased on day 22 (P < 0.001), which resulted in an average daily increase in fat oxidation of ≥15 g. Glucose and ghrelin did not change significantly from baseline with alternate-day fasting, whereas fasting insulin decreased 57 ± 4% (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Alternate-day fasting was feasible in nonobese subjects, and fat oxidation increased. However, hunger on fasting days did not decrease, perhaps indicating the unlikelihood of continuing this diet for extended periods of time. Adding one small meal on a fasting day may make this approach to dietary restriction more acceptable.
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Old 01-03-2012, 03:00 PM   #57
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ScienceDaily (Apr. 3, 2011) — Fasting has long been associated with religious rituals, diets, and political protests. Now new evidence from cardiac researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute demonstrates that routine periodic fasting is also good for your health, and your heart.

Research cardiologists at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute are reporting that fasting not only lowers one's risk of coronary artery disease and diabetes, but also causes significant changes in a person's blood cholesterol levels. Both diabetes and elevated cholesterol are known risk factors for coronary heart disease.

The discovery expands upon a 2007 Intermountain Healthcare study that revealed an association between fasting and reduced risk of coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death among men and women in America. In the new research, fasting was also found to reduce other cardiac risk factors, such as triglycerides, weight, and blood sugar levels.

The findings were presented on April 3, at the annual scientific sessions of the American College of Cardiology in New Orleans.

"These new findings demonstrate that our original discovery was not a chance event," says Dr. Benjamin D. Horne, PhD, MPH, director of cardiovascular and genetic epidemiology at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute, and the study's principal investigator. "The confirmation among a new set of patients that fasting is associated with lower risk of these common diseases raises new questions about how fasting itself reduces risk or if it simply indicates a healthy lifestyle."

Unlike the earlier research by the team, this new research recorded reactions in the body's biological mechanisms during the fasting period. The participants' low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, the "bad" cholesterol) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, the "good" cholesterol) both increased (by 14 percent and 6 percent, respectively) raising their total cholesterol -- and catching the researchers by surprise.

"Fasting causes hunger or stress. In response, the body releases more cholesterol, allowing it to utilize fat as a source of fuel, instead of glucose. This decreases the number of fat cells in the body," says Dr. Horne. "This is important because the fewer fat cells a body has, the less likely it will experience insulin resistance, or diabetes."

This recent study also confirmed earlier findings about the effects of fasting on human growth hormone (HGH), a metabolic protein. HGH works to protect lean muscle and metabolic balance, a response triggered and accelerated by fasting. During the 24-hour fasting periods, HGH increased an average of 1,300 percent in women, and nearly 2,000 percent in men.

In this most recent trial, researchers conducted two fasting studies of over 200 individuals -- both patients and healthy volunteers -- who were recruited at Intermountain Medical Center. A second 2011 clinical trial followed another 30 patients who drank only water and ate nothing else for 24 hours. They were also monitored while eating a normal diet during an additional 24-hour period. Blood tests and physical measurements were taken from all to evaluate cardiac risk factors, markers of metabolic risk, and other general health parameters.

While the results were surprising to researchers, it's not time to start a fasting diet just yet. It will take more studies like these to fully determine the body's reaction to fasting and its effect on human health. Dr. Horne believes that fasting could one day be prescribed as a treatment for preventing diabetes and coronary heart disease.

To help achieve the goal of expanded research, the Deseret Foundation (which funded the previous fasting studies) recently approved a new grant to evaluate many more metabolic factors in the blood using stored samples from the recent fasting clinical trial. The researchers will also include an additional clinical trial of fasting among patients who have been diagnosed with coronary heart disease.

"We are very grateful for the financial support from the Deseret Foundation. The organization and its donors have made these groundbreaking studies of fasting possible," added Dr. Horne.

Members of the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute research team included Dr. Horne, Jeffrey L. Anderson, MD, John F. Carlquist, PhD, J. Brent Muhlestein, MD, Donald L. Lappé, MD, Heidi T. May, PhD, MSPH, Boudi Kfoury, MD, Oxana Galenko, PhD, Amy R. Butler, Dylan P. Nelson, Kimberly D. Brunisholz, Tami L. Bair, and Samin Panahi.

(emphasis mine)

Last edited by sophiethecat; 01-03-2012 at 03:57 PM..
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Old 01-04-2012, 06:04 AM   #58
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HGH also stimulates the imune system. Having a fever also stimulates the imune system.
This makes some sense of the old saying " starve a cold feed a fever "

I didn't book mark it but I read one rat study that found some of the same health
benefits found with CR by making them fast one day and eat all they wanted the next
day. The rats ate almost twice what they would normaly eat on there non fasting day
so didn't lose weight but there chlosterol,blood sugar and blood pressure showed inprovement. So perhaps some of the benifits of JUDDD don't reley on us losing weight.
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Old 01-04-2012, 06:39 AM   #59
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Sophie, YOU ROCK!! Thank you for taking the time to post all of this valuable information!! I am taking the time to go back and read all that you have posted here carefully.

I find the benefits of this lifestyle amazing. I knew I wasn't crazy when I felt like all of my clothes had gotten much looser, and fast! I have been tracking my inches lost (only in problem areas-waist, hip and thighs ), and the results are wonderful.

DH has gone from 235 to 224 in one month. I can really see how much flatter his tummy is. We both have experienced more calm demeanors, and less stress. His friends at work are really taking notice. Let's see if they follow along.
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