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Old 12-30-2005, 11:30 AM   #31
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This is another one from Linda Sue's website.. http://users3.ev1.net/~fontlady/recipes.html
I've made this several times and it's great!-- I usually make it with a whole chicken to get the homemade broth. I never tried the Chayote squash until I saw it in this recipe. It's a great ingredient for low carb soups.

CHUNKY CHICKEN & VEGETABLE SOUP II

1 tablespoon oil
1 tablespoon butter
2 boneless chicken breasts, cubed, 10-12 ounces
1/2 cup celery, chopped, 2 small stalks
3 small carrots, sliced, 3 ounces *
2 chayote squash, peeled, seeded and cubed
4 medium fresh mushrooms, sliced, 4 ounces
1/4 cup onion, chopped, 1 1/4 ounces
2 cans chicken broth or 4 cups homemade
1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granules
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Salt, to taste
2 tablespoons heavy cream, (half-n-half for Rosedale) optional

Heat oil and butter in a 4-6 quart soup pot over medium heat. Add chicken; cook and stir 4-5 minutes or just until no longer pink. Add all of the vegetables. Cook and stir 7 minutes. Add broth, bouillon, water, parsley, pepper and salt. Simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add cream, if desired.
Makes 6 servings

* Omit the carrots for induction (or the first 3 weeks on the Rosedale plan)

Per Serving: 166 Calories; 8g Fat; 18g Protein; 5g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 4g Net Carbs
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Last edited by mrstmitch; 12-30-2005 at 11:34 AM..
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Old 12-30-2005, 11:34 AM   #32
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Another one from Linda Sue's website: http://users3.ev1.net/~fontlady/recipes.html

HUNGARIAN GOULASH SOUP

2 tablespoons butter
1 small onion, chopped, 2 1/2 ounces
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 pound beef, cut in 1-inch cubes
2 tablespoons paprika
14.5 ounce can diced tomatoes
3 beef bouillon cubes
1 teaspoon granular Splenda
1/2 teaspoon marjoram
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 can beef broth
6 cups water
1 small zucchini, diced, 4 ounces
1 medium green pepper, chopped

In large soup pot, heat butter. Brown meat in hot butter along with onion and garlic. Add paprika; stir to coat meat. Add everything except the zucchini and green peppers. Bring to a boil; simmer covered 1 hour or until beef is tender. Add vegetables and cook another 20 minutes.
Makes 2 quarts or about 6 servings

Can be frozen

Per Serving: 220 Calories; 13g Fat; 19g Protein; 8g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 6g Net Carbs
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Old 12-30-2005, 11:42 AM   #33
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Once again, Linda Sue's website: http://users3.ev1.net/~fontlady/recipes.html
This soup would not be appropriate for the first 3 weeks on Rosedale, but is great for something different, but no more than 2 or 3 times per week. (I get some great chicken sausage at my local HFS--using chicken sausage would make the recipe good for any day) With pork sausage, it would be good to serve with company, or freeze for meals in the future.

TUSCANO SOUP

1 pound Italian sausage
1 small onion, diced, 2 1/2 ounces
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 cups chicken broth
10 ounce package frozen chopped spinach, thawed
1/2 cup heavy cream
Salt and pepper, to taste
Freshly grated parmesan cheese, optional

Remove sausage from casings, if necessary. Brown sausage in a 4-quart soup pot along with onion and garlic; drain fat. Add broth and undrained spinach; bring to a boil. Cover and simmer 30 minutes. Add cream and simmer a few minutes until cream is heated. Season to taste. Sprinkle a little parmesan cheese over each serving, if desired.

Makes six 3/4-cup servings or 5-6 cups

Per Serving: 366 Calories; 32g Fat; 15g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 2g Net Carbs
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Old 12-30-2005, 11:51 AM   #34
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This is a recipe posted by a low carb chef on another site... it's very versatile, and can be modified to your liking- (and, it's delicious!)

Quote:
I started making this soup during a non-dairy phase and found that the Dijon added a special zing to the flavour. Add more if you like it!
Other vegetables can replace the cauliflower: asparagus, spinach, red bell peppers, tomatoes or more cauliflower. I once made it with red Swiss chard stalks and it was delicious! If you use a fibrous vegetable like asparagus, strain the soup through a sieve after pureeing.
There are many options for garnishing - bacon bits, chunks of chicken, ham, sour cream, crispy prosciutto or pancetta, smoked salmon or a sprinkling of cheese. Blue cheese is great with plain cauliflower and smoked salmon is elegant on asparagus.

Basic Vegetable Cream Soup

1 lb. cauliflower
1 1/2 lbs. broccoli, or one of the suggestions above
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
10 cups chicken stock
1 tsp. salt
1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 tsp. dried tarragon leaves, or herb of your choice
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
heavy cream, (half-n-half) optional

Trim the broccoli and cauliflower and chop coarsely. The core of the cauliflower and the broccoli should be used too. Save a few tiny florets of broccoli to add later.

In a large pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and sizzle until it smells fragrant. Add the broccoli, cauliflower, stock and salt. Bring to a boil, turn down and cook at a lively simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes.

Puree in batches in a food processor or blender - a blender works best for this - with the mustard and tarragon add the broccoli florets and season to taste. Thin with stock or water if the soup is too thick. Add the cream if desired.

The dairy is optional and not included in the count.

Quote:
Total Recipe counts:
• Total Calories: 566
• Fat: 31 grams
• Carbs: 63 grams
• Fiber: 33 grams
• Protein: 31 grams
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Old 12-31-2005, 01:11 PM   #35
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Crock Pot Mediterranean Beef

This recipe is sooo easy, and yummy! Any type of stew-beef can be used, but I think the boneless ribs turn out the best. This can be made ahead of time and eaten with veggies on the side. Feta or parmesan cheese can be sprinked when served... lots of possibilities!

Crock Pot Mediterranean Beef

1.5 lbs boneless beef ribs
1 tsp sea salt
1 Tbs italian seasoning
1 clove Garlic
1/3 cup sundried tomatoes
1/2 cup beef broth
1/2 cup sliced ripe olives
1/2 cup frozen pearl onions

Brown meat in skillet. Sprinkle with salt, italian seasoning and garlic. Remove from skillet, place in cooker. Top with tomatoes, and olive; add broth and onions. Cook on low 5-6 hours. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

[COLOR=Purple]
Nutrition for 6 servings:

Calories 268.78
Total Fat 18.44g
Saturated Fat 7.10g
Carbohydrates 3.85g
Dietary Fiber 1.07g
Net Carbohydrates 2.78g
Protein 21.09g [/COLOR]

[COLOR=RoyalBlue]
Nutrition for 8 servings:

Calories 201
Total Fat 13.83g
Saturated Fat 5.32g
Carbohydrates 2.88g
Dietary Fiber 0.80g
Net Carbohydrates 2.08g
Protein 15g [/COLOR]
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Old 01-13-2006, 02:04 PM   #36
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Creamless Spinach Soup

Creamless Spinach Soup

* 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
* 1 teaspoon garlic, chopped
* 1 cup medium diced onion
* ¼ cup medium diced carrots
* 1 cup medium diced celery
* 1 cup medium diced leek
* 6 cups water
* 2 bay leaves
* sprig of thyme
* 2 pounds of chopped spinach

PREPARATION:
Method
1. Heat the olive oil in a medium stock pot and saute the garlic for
two minutes.

2. Add onion, celery, leeks and carrots to the pot.

3. Saute until the onions are translucent.

4. Add water, bay leaves, and thyme to the stock pot.

5. Bring to a boil and reduce to simmer for one hour.

6. Allow to set for one hour to cool.

7. Remove bay leaves and thyme.

8. Puree vegetables and broth in a blender.

9. Pour the puree back into the stock pot and add spinach.

10. Bring to medium heat and cook until spinach wilts.

Serve hot.
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Old 01-13-2006, 02:08 PM   #37
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Riceless Jambalaya

Ingredients
1 (16-ounce) jar roasted pepper and garlic chunky salsa
8 ounces reduced-fat smoked sausage, diced (could be chicken sausage)
1/2 pound peeled small shrimp
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 bunch green onions (scallions), sliced
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
3/4 cup reduced fat sour cream

Instructions

Mix salsa, sausage, shrimp, thyme and 1/3 cup green onions in Teflon non-stick skillet. Heat to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cook 10 minutes. Meanwhile, mix cayenne and sour cream. Serve with a dollop of low-fat sour cream.

Makes 4 to 6 servings
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Old 01-13-2006, 04:20 PM   #38
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I forget who posted this link, but I'm copying the adjusted recipe here.

Yin and Yang Salad with Macadamia-Sesame Dressing


4 cups shredded napa cabbage
3 cups shredded red cabbage
1 carrot, peeled and julienned
1 (2 1/2-inch) piece daikon radish, peeled and julienned (or regular radish)
10 green onions (white and green parts), julienned
1 cup Macadamia-Sesame Dressing (recipe follows)
4 cups 1/2-inch cubes chilled ginger tofu (recipe follows)
2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

Toss the cabbage, carrots, radish, and green onions in a large bowl with enough dressing to coat. Mound the salad into 4 wide, shallow bowls or onto plates. Arrange the tofu around the salad. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds and serve.

Serves 4.
Macadamia-Sesame Dressing

2/3 cup macadamia butter
1/3 cup brown rice vinegar
1 package sweetener
3 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons tamari
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic
1 1/2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro leaves

Ann's header notes: If you'd like a spicier dressing, just add more crushed red pepper flakes. This thickens up once it's refrigerated, so you can either add a little water to thin it or leave it thick to use as a sauce on grains and other cooked dishes.

Blend the macadamia butter, vinegar, sweetener, water, tamari, ginger, garlic, sesame oil, and crushed red pepper in a food processor until smooth and creamy. Add the cilantro and blend just until it's finely chopped The dressing will keep for 2 days, covered and refrigerated.

Makes abaut 1 1/4 cups.

Gingered Tofu
2 (12-ounce) containers water-packed extra-flrm tofu
2/3 cup tamari
1/4 cup brown rice vinegar
1/4 cup toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
I tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
I tablespoon oil (neutral in taste)

Drain the tofu and save the containers. Cut into 1-inch wide strips, and pat dry with paper towels. Cover a large baking sheet with more dry paper towels. Place Ihe tofu in a single layer over the towels on the baking sheet and let drain for 2 hours, changing the paper towels after 1 hour.

Whisk the tamari, vinegar, sesame oil, garlic, and ginger in a bowl to blend. Pour half of the marinade into the reserved tofu containers. Return the tofu slices to the containers, and pour the remaining marinade over. Cover and refrigerate at least 4 hours and up to 1 day.

Preheat the oven to 400'F. Oil a heavy, rimmcd baking sheet with the oil. Drain the tofu and place it on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes on each side until golden brown and heated through. Serve warm or cold, or at room temperature. The tofu will keep for 1 day, covered and refrigerated.

Serves 4 to 6.
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Old 01-13-2006, 04:31 PM   #39
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Donna, do you normally like tofu? I have tried it several different ways in recipes and find it disgusting. Would you say that any recipe with tofu would not be agreeable to my palate, or does this recipe somehow make it tasty? Also, is tofu made from fermented soy?
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Old 01-13-2006, 11:48 PM   #40
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Hi Verleen,

I don't mind tofu. It is made from soy, but it is not fermented. When my brother was in the Phillippines, he learned to put a nice carmelized crust on tofu. A big part of it is getting rid of the moisture. Mostly it has no flavor on it's own, it takes it's flavor from the seasonings, and must be marinated, as it is in this recipe. But if you don't like it, I wouldn't cook it. That would be silly.
Donna
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Old 01-17-2006, 05:47 PM   #41
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Hot & Sour Chicken soup (Oriental)


Chinese Hot & Sour Soup
1 lb. chicken breasts, cut into small pieces
juice of 2 lemons
about ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
½ cup toasted slivered almonds
1 bunch green onions, sliced on an angle
1 med carrot, jullienned
1 red bell pepper, cut into julliene sticks
1 cup broccoli, cut into small flowerets
2 cloves garlic, finely chipped
1 tsp. freshly ground ginger, or dried powdered equivalen
1 packet of sweetener of choice (I use Stevia Plus)
¼ tsp. red pepper flakes
2 Tblsp. soy sauce, or liquid aminos
1/8 cup rice vinegar
2-3 cups chicken stock
(I bought 2 pkgs. of chicken breasts and boiled them, saving out 1 lb for this recipe. Then I used liquid from cooking whole chicken breasts. Plus I had cooked chicken breasts left over for chicken salad, etc.)
Optional - 2 Tbsp. arrowroot, made into slurry with 2 Tblsp water

Marinate cut up chicken breasts in lemon juice at least several hours. Remove and pat dry with paper towels. Mix chick. stock, vinegar, sou sauce, pepper flakes, ginger, garlic and sweetener. Set aside.

In a heavy skillet or wok, saute chicken in batches in olive oil (or oil of your choice. Toasted sesame makes it extra good, but I'm not sure it is allowed.) Remove chicken to a bowl and reserve. Add nuts to pan and toast until golden. Remove to same bowl. Saute onions, carrot, broccoli and pepper about 2 min. Add sauce mixture and bring just to a boil. (don't cook veggies any more. they are supposed to be crisp-tender.) Return chicken and almonds to the pan and mix well.

Optional: Add arrowroot slurry to slightly thicken soup, as you would find it in a Chinese restaurant. One of my favorite dishes when eating out, and now I can have it on Rosedale.
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Old 05-30-2006, 06:31 AM   #42
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Sorry for jumping in here, but just what IS the Rosedale Diet? I've never heard of it before. I don't want to mess up this recipe thread, so if you want to explain it in another post, that's ok. Thanks!
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Old 05-30-2006, 07:00 AM   #43
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Hi shirley! Here is a link to a thread about the Rosedale diet. It is a diet to restore a body to health. As a result of better health, the pounds start falling off. I did terrible on Atkins. I didn't lose an ounce on months on Induction. Very frustrating. I did start losing when I tried Lean For Life, which is a controlled, moderate protein, low fat and low glycemic carbs are added in. Just a couple months after that, I switched to Rosedale. That was in December 2004. Since then, I have reversed some of my metabolic diseases as proven by my bloodwork. I continue to experiment and have always found that what Dr. Rosedale recommends works. For example, there is alot of hype that oats are good for you. Baloney! They sure do me in with my diabetes. I no longer eat oats and I'm doing much better with my blood sugars.


http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/sh...Rosedale+rules
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Old 05-30-2006, 07:10 AM   #44
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Here are some excerpts from an article

Timing is Everything

Who would have thought that achieving and maintaining a healthy weight might have as much to do with when we eat as it does with what we eat? A new discovery about how our bodies function shows that this is indeed the case.


Almost anyone can parrot the weight loss mantra "Eat less, exercise more". That is not going to change. The good sense of eating foods that are lower on the glycemic index is not going to change either. What may change is our idea about grazing, eating numerous small "meals" during the day, and snacking.

In a recent Harvard study, authors Cutler, Glaeser, and Shapiro pointed to extra calories from snacking as the weight gain culprit. They reported that the average number of daily snacks has risen by 60 percent since the early 70s. Just three cookies a day can account for a weight gain of 10-15 pounds in 20 years. Although most peoples don't think 20 years into the future, we only think of how much weight I can lose today. Cutting out the snacks is a good first step toward "eating fitness". Perhaps we ought to go back to the drawing board and give weight loss a look-see from a whole perspective.

What would you say if you learned that the answer to weight loss lies within the very cells that are making us fat. Not because they are there, that's obvious, but because of what they do. They don't just pad our organs, help us maintain our body temperature, and act as caloric storage units. They function in a specific way that is directly related to our appetites. In persons who are overweight or obese, this function has gone array. Healthy weight- and health improvements which go beyond those bestowed by weight loss alone-can be obtained by restoring these cells to their proper synchronicity.

To simplify a complex conversation, in 1994, scientists discovered that the fat cells in white adipose tissue (or body fat) secrete a hormone that directs appetite, affecting energy balance and metabolism. This hormone has been named Leptin. Until this discovery, glands were identified as specific clusters of tissues like the thyroid, adrenal, and sex glands. In effect, body fat can be conceived of as a large endocrine gland, similar to the skin as a respiratory organ of the bulk of intestinal bacteria as a digestive organ.

Leptin was soon discovered to be involved with insulin, with the cardiovascular system, immune function, reproductive function, stress, bone health, cancer, and inflammation as well as interacting with all our known hormones. ( In fact, fat cells communicate with at least 15 other signals...a much more complex system than previously believed.)

In varying pulses and surges throughout the day and night, leptin sends messages to the brain. When there are problems in this ebb and flow, health conditions can follow. In addition to obesity, these include anorexia, loss of immunity, bone loss, gastrointestinal problems, liver malfunction, heart disease, cancer, cognitive problems and nerve problems.

Leptin functions by gauging our fuel supply. It does this by allowing or restricting energy production. In their remarkable book Mastering Leptin, authors Richards and Richards declare, "Leptin is truly the survival principle of the subconscious mind." When the brain senses that leptin levels are high, we get the message to decrease food intake (our appetite is reduced) and our metabolic rate increases, breaking down fat and supplying us with energy. When it senses that leptin is low, then the brain slows down our metabolism so that we don't run out of fuel and die of starvation. Equally importantly, we will be hungry and want to eat.

Seem straight forward, doesn't it? Here is the paradox. Overweight and obese people have high leptin levels, so why don't their brains notify their bodies to amp up and burn more fat? Basically, this is because our bodies are tuned to lack of food. This is a problem that doesn't exist for most people living in the US. The [problem here is " food everywhere". Constant eating yields constant messaging from fat cells. The brain becomes leptin resistant even though there is more than enough leptin (produced by more than enough fat).

The brain is not receiving the sufficiency signal to turn on fat burning. Instead, it receives the red light on the fuel gauge, slows metabolism, and ramps up the hunger signal. As the Richardses comment, the brain doesn't see the body in a mirror. Instead, it gives an irresistible message of hunger, even of intense hunger.

A sure sign of leptin resistance is being unable to resist eating at night. Once leptin resistance sets in, the pancreas doesn't receive a signal to stop releasing insulin. This encourages the body to store calories as fat. In addition, because fat burning is slowed down, survival signals cause carbohydrates to be stored as fat. Furthermore, in the normal fat burning process, adrenaline is released, stimulating the fat cells to release energy. However, in the presence of leptin resistance, the adrenaline isn't used to burn fat. The fat cells become "numb" to the stimulation of adrenaline. This cause fat to accumulate around the middle. The heightened adrenaline also causes high blood pressure and sleep problems.

Although leptin resistance syndrome becomes a significant barrier to weight loss after age 30, increasing overweight among young persons indicates that leptin issues are now becoming common much earlier.

Stress Eating

In Mastering Leptin, the authors bring a light to the reason we are driven to eat junk food when we are stressed.

Stress cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). This revs the body up for action. We feel agitated and discomfitted with no place to focus that energy. One way to calm down is to eat. The higher the concentration of calories in the food we eat, the more quickly the stress reaction diminishes.

As we eat, insulin levels increase, lowering our blood sugar. The fastest way to accomplish this is to eat a combination of fat and sweet: ice cream, rich cookies, or a candy bar. Eating such foods can settle our reaction in a matter of minutes.

More intense stress or more long lasting stress causes more severe hyperglycemia. In this condition, we are drawn to eat fatty salty foods: a bag of chips, a burger with fries, etc. Eating junk food is a temporary fix for soothing uncomfortable feelings. In the long run, when we make junk food our drug, we pay with our health. Take a run or a walk. do some stretching. Go up and down the stairs a couple of times. Work off the excess energy. Even some deep breathing and drinking a big glass of water can help.





Follow The Rules

From their indepth study of current leptin research combined with personal experience and feedback from clients, Richards and Richards have developed the Five Rules. The bottom-line of the rules is to restore the body's sensitivity to leptin. Happily, this automatically leads to weight loss, particularly weight loss from the midriff. However, the most important aspect of following the rules is that the body reestablishes the ability to efficiently produce energy from food.

When it comes to natural balance, timing is everything. The rules put the body back in sync. They are not rules for losing weight; they are rules to live by. Not only will following them normalize weight. doing so protects those without weight problems from gaining weight as they grow older.

The Five Rules

Rule 1: NEVER EAT AFTER DINNER.
Rule 2: EAT 3 MEALS A DAY, and DO NOT SNACK.
Rule 3: DO NOT EAT LARGE MEALS.
Rule 4: EAT SOME PROTEIN AT BREAKFAST.
Rule 5: REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF CARBS EATEN.

Richards and Richards promise that the Five Rules prevent and correct Leptin, insulin, and adrenaline resistance, fatigue, and mood problems. The end result of not undertaking the rules is the inevitable failure to reach and/or maintain goal weight. Because the rules impact our brains at a core survival level, they apply to nearly everybody. Exceptions include growing youngsters, elite athletes, and people with diabetes.

There is science (and good sense) behind each rule. Rule 1: Generally, finish eating three hours before bedtime, never go to bed with a full stomach, and allow 11-12 hours between dinner and breakfast. Surprisingly, our bodies use fat as a fuel in the hours just before we wake. About 9-12 hours after our dinner, our bodies access fat from the thighs, stomach and rear. The calories we burn during the day come directly that day's food intake or are already in the blood. The only exception of this is during intense exercise. (After 40 minutes., aerobic exercise at a non-stressful heart rate causes fat stores to be metabolized.) If one eats before bed, the body is digesting, and liptin signals the brain that no energy is needed. The fat burning mechanism never comes into play.

Within Rule 2, we learn that eating every 2-3 waking hours (snacking, grazing, and eating small meals) is counterproductive to having our goal weight. This is because during the first three hours after a meal, insulin is in charge of storing the calories from the food we have eaten. Clearly, it is impossible to lose weight during this operation. That is the reason the rule direct us to eat every 5-6 hours.

Even low calorie snacks stimulate insulin release, not to mention waiting an hour after a meal to eat dessert. In this case, fat burning either ceases or never gets started in the first place.

Some people may find it impossible to eat every 5-6 hours and still function. If this is you, eat four meals daily, every four hours. With regular exercise and some opportunity for fat burning to come into play, and health will improve. With time, the three-meal plan can be adopted without having energy crashes between meals.

Many children, teens, bodybuilders and athletes have a higher demand for calories to aid their body's growth and repair. They can break Rule 2 with impunity. That privilege tends to disappear after age 30.

Rule 3 says quit eating large meals. The object of this rule is to improve metabolic efficiency by not giving the body more fuel than it can use. Over filling the stomach is a well known stress inducer. In this context, habitual excess food at meals leads directly to leptin and insulin resistance. The amount of food eaten at a meal depends on the physical activity for that day. One of the easiest techniques for reducing meal size is to slow down food intake. It takes ten minutes for the brain to realize you are full. Allow 30-45 minutes to eat. Taste the food. Chew thoroughly. If you just can't slow down your eating, take a five minute break in the middle of the meal. Stop eating before you feel full. Not only will you feel more energetic (and more satisfied) with less food, calorie intake is subtly being reduced.

Eating a protein-based breakfast, per Rule 4, keeps the body in a calorie-burning mode. It supports blood sugar levels in such a way that late afternoon energy crashes are minimized. Energy crashes are frequently the result of eating a breakfast with too many carbohydrates and very little protein. If you are leptin resistant and eat a high carb breakfast (juice, cereal, pancakes, a bagel, toast), overeating becomes the norm, particularly at night.

Interestingly, although carbohydrate and protein each supply the body with 4 calories of energy per gram, their effects on metabolism are very different.

Comparatively speaking, it is easy for the body to utilize fat (9 calories per gram) and carbohydrate. These foods increase the liver's metabolic rate by a mere four percent. On the other hand, protein is a much more complex nutrient.

A high protein meal can increase metabolism by 30 percent for a long as 12 hours, the equivalent of a 3-4 mile jog! Protein also helps solve fluid retention problems. Increase protein slowly and add regular exercise to bring your protein power to the max. However, excess protein, that which the body doesn't immediately need for rebuilding muscle, is converted to glucose and stored as fat. For a diabetic, excess protein will significantly raise blood sugar. For most people, 3 ounces is sufficient.

Lastly, Rule 5 instructs us to reduce the amount of carbohydrate eaten. Taking the findings of the Harvard study about overweigh and snacking a step further, Americans actually eat double the amount of carbohydrates that the body is able to metabolize. This causes a big imbalance in the insulin (fat storage) - glucagon (energy mobilization) hormones.

Too many carbohydrates confuse the natural ebb and flow of leptin. For example, if too many carbs are eaten at lunch, you may find yourself ravishingly hungry at dinner. An excess of carbs keeps the body from going to its fat reserves for energy. Plus, excess carbs even when they are fat free - are easily stored as fat.

This does not mean no carbs. Under the condition of insufficient carb intake, the thyroid turns off, electrolytes become deregulated, muscles dehydrate and weaken, growth hormone is not released correctly, the heart and the kidneys can become distressed, the digestive system doesn't work properly, fat is not burned efficiently, and one is left dissatisfied after eating. Carbs are essential.

Last word on the last rule is an easy way to determine if you are eating too many carbohydrates. Weigh in when you get up in the morning and then again before you go to bed. Compare. If, at night, you weigh more than two pounds over your morning weigh - and you followed rules 1-4 during the day - then, you've taken in too many carbs that day.

Supplemental Support

Various nutrients can support the body to overcome leptin, insulin, and adrenaline resistance, to lose weight, and to restore efficient energy production.

According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, the consequences of overweight are the worse than previously known, causing significantly reduced lifespan. Overweight at 40? Three years off your life.

Obese? Subrtract 6-7.

Overweight and smoke? That can cost you 13 years.
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Old 05-30-2006, 07:10 AM   #45
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Calcium: Calcium is able to counteract a particular brain signal (called agouti) which encourages appetite. Agouti causes metabolism to slow, resulting in weight gain. By lowering agouti with increased calcium intake, thyroid function and metabolism are improved. This only works with appropriate dietary restriction. It won't work if excess calories are consumed. Take 2000-3000 mg of calcium daily.

Vitamin D: This vitamin is a powerful inhibitor of leptin secretion. In addition, vitamin D is necessary to calcium absorption. Take 400-800 IU of vitamin D daily (including the amount in any multivitamin-mineral formula).

Pantethine: A coenzyme form of pantothenic acid, pantethine is the extact form used in metabolism. The supplement is useful in restoring the metabolism of fat. It does this by helping to make fat available for fuel. One recent study showed that six months of use resulted in significantly reduced abdominal fat as well as healing fatty liver disease. To get desired effects from this nutrient, take 600-900 mg daily.

Essential Fatty Acids: Unfortunately, extra pounds of fat result in an ongoing unhealthy inflammatory response by the immune system. Inflammation is not only painful, it causes premature aging (one of the reasons overweight people have reduced lifespans). Omega 3 oils (fish and flax) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA from evening primrose, borage, and black current oils) can reduce inflammation. In addition, fish oils reduce insulin resistance and enhance glucose utilization. Blood sugar (glucose) fluctuations must be normalized to restore correct leptin function. Adding 3-9 grams of these oils to the diet can reduce excess inflammation and support weight loss.

CLA, conjudated linoleic acid: Over the last 20 years, intense research has been conducted on this nutrient by scientists at the University of Wisconsin. Richards and Richards state that it is one of the most powerful nutrients known to stop leptin resistance as well as reduce inflammatory signals. It can reduce leptin reduction by as much as 42 percent. This simultaneously increases fat burning. There are also indications that CLA supports growth hormone function, reduces nighttime food cravings, and hastens the weight loss process. The science behind CLA relates to its ability to reduce cancer, reduce hardening of the arteries, prevent diabetes, and reduce body fat. Once health is restored, the body no longer needs CLA. Meanwhile, recommended doses range from 3-6 grams per day. (Because CLA is an easily oxidized fatty acid, take it with vitamin E).

ALC, acetyl-l-carnitine: This amino acid has been found to help the brain correctly sense the amount of leptin being produced by fat cells, thereby overcoming leptin resistance. In addition, when taken before bed, ALC stimulates the production of growth hormone, the youth hormone. ALC has many other actions not related to weight loss. These include improved cognitive function, enhanced stress tolerance, and uplifted mood. Dosage ranges from 500-2500 mg daily. The most common dose is 500 mg 2 times daily.
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Old 08-16-2009, 03:56 AM   #46
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Rosedale recipes

What is this Rosedale? Another diet book/plan?
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Old 08-16-2009, 04:15 AM   #47
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It is a healthy diet plan, rather than a fad weight lose diet. It works to address the causes of bad health and obesity. The diet works to reverse leptin resistance and insulin sensitivity. Leptin is the hormone in your body that instructs your body to store fat instead of burning it for fuel. It has reversed diseases in many people, not only in the doctor's clinic but for those who follow the book. There is a yahoo list for the Rosedale Diet. It is a sensible diet stressing moderate and controlled amounts of protein and lots of healthy vegetables and fats. It restricts high carb vegetables and fruits, processed foods and unhealthy fats.
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Old 03-24-2011, 07:08 AM   #48
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This low carb cake will satisfy your sweet tooth without raising blood sugar. I make a cream cheese frosting with butter and sweetener to really make this great! Delicious!
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Old 04-25-2013, 12:16 PM   #49
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This is a fine thread ...I hope everyone comes back to it
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