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Psmileyf 10-22-2013 06:29 AM

Testing blood sugar
 
Any non-diabetics check their blood sugars?
I bought a meter this morning. Of course, I already had my coffee with HWC and sweet n lo before I tested. My results were 93 which means nothing to me.

One of the guys I work with told me he checks his every morning, so I need to talk to him about what to look for.

Anyone have any experience to share?

Ntombi 10-22-2013 06:36 AM

I check mine every so often. Before I started LC way back when, I was fairly severely hypoglycemic, which means I would sometimes have really low blood glucose, causing me to be dizzy, nauseated, and more. Once I started Atkins the first time, I learned that limiting sugar and eating enough protein helped reduce my hypoglycemic episodes (though of course, eating LC helped even more). All that is to say that I have some experience with a blood glucose meter because of that.

If you google fasting or non-fasting (also called post-prandial) blood glucose numbers, you'll get a good idea of what a "normal" range is.

clackley 10-22-2013 07:30 AM

I check mine periodically and am not diabetic. I thought it would be a good tool to access how various foods impacted blood glucose. As it turned out, I have what is called physiological insulin resistance which means that I have elevated b.g. first thing in the morning. My a1c is normal.

NurseChef 10-22-2013 09:57 AM

93 is a normal number. My numbers come down later in the day. I am borderline. Yesterday my blood sugar was 111, 118 on a recheck before dinner. It was in the upper 160's in the morning.
I have Dawn's Syndrome where my liver produces too much glycogen and I don't secrete enough insulin to drop the numbers in the morning but staying busy in the day the numbers drop to near normal with
Eating on Atkins and without medications.
I go to the Dr in the new year
And trust me that will be a relief when my Dr tells me what to do from
There.i just know my blood sugar is the best it is going to be with a 20 carb daily routine and there is nothing left I can change.

ravenrose 10-22-2013 10:15 AM

I am diabetic, so this is not a direct answer to your question.

I think there is a little info non-diabetics can get from testing, but not a whole lot. the fasting number is probably the most important.

unless you have unusual situations like the other two posters, but those are unusual.

if your insulin metabolism is normal, when you eat your insulin deals with the carbs, so you don't learn too much from the testing levels though.

good luck!


PS to NurseChef: Metformin is a very helpful drug and the earlier you start it, the better and longer it works. Have you talked to your doctor about it? I would strongly advocate for it unless there is a special reason not to take it! metformin is associated with less alzheimers and some forms of cancer too!

Liz1959 10-22-2013 10:43 AM

I'm not diabetic, but I check mine. I'm not worried about my fasting. It's always fine, or reasonable. I like to see how my body responds to different foods, exercise, alcohol, etc. How high it goes up, how long it takes to come back down... What it is when I feel weird...
I think that by the time fasting BS tests high, there is already damage, or you are well on your way.
After a Gary Taubes video, Berstein's Diabetes Solution was my intro to low carb, then I found Jenny Ruhl's Blood Sugar 101. It's all good info whether you are diabetic or like me, just don't ever want to be.

clackley 10-22-2013 12:49 PM

Btw, I am not sure how unusual physiological insulin resistance is because there is very little information as most non diabetics are not testing and again it is framed within a ketogenic woe. Dr. Peter Dobromylskyj of hyperlipid blog is the only one with a medical background and knowledge of ketogenic diets that has written on the subject that I can tell.

In a nut shell, it is a product of ketosis and so long as your a1c test is within the normal range, there appears to be nothing to be concerned about. It appears to be a function of ketosis and is not pathological.

Psmileyf 10-22-2013 12:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Liz1959 (Post 16653844)
I'm not diabetic, but I check mine. I'm not worried about my fasting. It's always fine, or reasonable. I like to see how my body responds to different foods, exercise, alcohol, etc. How high it goes up, how long it takes to come back down... What it is when I feel weird...
I think that by the time fasting BS tests high, there is already damage, or you are well on your way.
After a Gary Taubes video, Berstein's Diabetes Solution was my intro to low carb, then I found Jenny Ruhl's Blood Sugar 101. It's all good info whether you are diabetic or like me, just don't ever want to be.

That is what I am looking for. Right now I am just having fun playing around with it.
89 before lunch. 90 right after lunch and 87 thirty minutes later, so with a margin of error, basically unaffected by my lunch.

Erin57 10-22-2013 12:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clackley (Post 16654043)
Btw, I am not sure how unusual physiological insulin resistance is because there is very little information as most non diabetics are not testing and again it is framed within a ketogenic woe. Dr. Peter Dobromylskyj of hyperlipid blog is the only one with a medical background and knowledge of ketogenic diets that has written on the subject that I can tell.

In a nut shell, it is a product of ketosis and so long as your a1c test is within the normal range, there appears to be nothing to be concerned about. It appears to be a function of ketosis and is not pathological.


I have read this also. If you are on low carb you would need to up your carbs for 3 days or so to 150+ to get a true reading.

clackley 10-22-2013 12:59 PM

I think that is only true for a glucose tolerance test. This is simply testing fasting b.g..

Erin57 10-22-2013 01:00 PM

Paula- I bought one last year and used it for a few months. My fasting was OK but I was shocked at how high my sugar could get an hour and then 2 after a meal. My sugars are always fine at the Dr. but I knew that I was headed toward insulin resistance. If I didn't have it already.

Psmileyf 10-22-2013 01:12 PM

That is what I figured. I would use it for a few months and grow tired of it. Kinda like the Ketostix. It was fascinating at first then I grew bored with it because I knew what to expect.

Janknitz 10-22-2013 03:00 PM

I'm not diabetic (yet) but very insulin resistant. I use it intermittently to check my fasting blood glucose, and to see how I respond to certain meals. If you're not diabetic, it should stay within a narrow range, and after you know what that range is, it's pretty boring. But I still check in occasionally to see how I'm doing.

I did have higher FBG's (around 110) and I'm on Metformin. I moved my evening dose from dinner time to bed time, and I have beautiful 80 to 85 FBG now.

I eat VLC, so I rarely have elevated BG's. Sometimes I feel really hypo, and I'm often surprised to find I'm still in the 80's or 70's. That tells me that whatever I ate must have spiked my BG, and when the insulin finally caught up it dropped too fast. I rarely get real hypos since going low carb.

Punkin 10-22-2013 03:20 PM

I find the meter useful for maintenance. I didn't use it much when I was losing, however when you start re-introducing carbs or rearranging your eating schedule around weight maintenance it can be helpful. Ie. Trying to figure out if you actually need to eat or is it just false hunger, stuff like that. Also pairing carbs with fibre doesn't make any difference for some people, the meter will tell you this.

Erin57 10-22-2013 04:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Psmileyf (Post 16654088)
That is what I figured. I would use it for a few months and grow tired of it. Kinda like the Ketostix. It was fascinating at first then I grew bored with it because I knew what to expect.

Also, after a few weeks of testing after meals your fingers get REALLY sore!:rofl:

DiamondDeb 10-22-2013 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Erin57 (Post 16654387)
Also, after a few weeks of testing after meals your fingers get REALLY sore!:rofl:

My fingers get sore after one prick so just thinking about this kills my curiosity.

rubidoux 10-22-2013 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Psmileyf (Post 16654057)
That is what I am looking for. Right now I am just having fun playing around with it.
89 before lunch. 90 right after lunch and 87 thirty minutes later, so with a margin of error, basically unaffected by my lunch.

At 30 min after eating, you might not see it hitting your system yet, or possibly just the beginning of it. Testing one hour after eating and two hours after eating will tell you more and if you're really interested in seeing how your body deals with a meal you might want to google "first phase insulin response" and "second phase insulin response". I think the first phase corresponds to the insulin you have stored and ready to go when you eat, then when you eat I guess your body makes some more insulin to excrete. I don't know much about this bc my dumb body doesn't make any insulin at all. :dunno:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Punkin (Post 16654272)
I find the meter useful for maintenance. I didn't use it much when I was losing, however when you start re-introducing carbs or rearranging your eating schedule around weight maintenance it can be helpful. Ie. Trying to figure out if you actually need to eat or is it just false hunger, stuff like that. Also pairing carbs with fibre doesn't make any difference for some people, the meter will tell you this.

Hmmm... I don't know about this. I feel like blood sugar and hunger are two very different things even in a person who has totally normal functioning and metabolism. I think if a normal healthy functioning person didn't eat all day, their blood sugar would probably just hang out between about 70 and 85, roughly. Your body should not be using up your blood sugar and running out, it should be making more as you need it, kwim?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Erin57 (Post 16654387)
Also, after a few weeks of testing after meals your fingers get REALLY sore!:rofl:

Omg, try 20 years of 10 times a day! :laugh:

Leo41 10-23-2013 03:11 AM

I am not diabetic, but my siblings are--and I cannot imagine pricking my finger unless I had to do so. When I donate blood, the finger prick is the only negative part of the process for me. Years ago, I had serious surgery, and the finger prick in the ER was the most painful part of the entire procedure for me!

I am hypothyroid and am checked every 4 months. My endo runs the A1C in addition to fasting blood sugar, so I'm monitored in terms of any BS abnormalities.

How we 'respond' to any particular food is so complex that I doubt anyone except a diabetic who is used to regularly checking blood sugar would understand the readings and what they mean.

So I just watch my calories and carbs to manage my weight and use Dr. Atkins's original advice--i.e., when my carbs are too high, I know from the return of my insatiable appetite.

Punkin 10-23-2013 11:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rubidoux (Post 16654624)
At 30 min after eating, you might not see it hitting your system yet, or possibly just the beginning of it. Testing one hour after eating and two hours after eating will tell you more and if you're really interested in seeing how your body deals with a meal you might want to google "first phase insulin response" and "second phase insulin response". I think the first phase corresponds to the insulin you have stored and ready to go when you eat, then when you eat I guess your body makes some more insulin to excrete. I don't know much about this bc my dumb body doesn't make any insulin at all. :dunno:



Hmmm... I don't know about this. I feel like blood sugar and hunger are two very different things even in a person who has totally normal functioning and metabolism. I think if a normal healthy functioning person didn't eat all day, their blood sugar would probably just hang out between about 70 and 85, roughly. Your body should not be using up your blood sugar and running out, it should be making more as you need it, kwim?



Omg, try 20 years of 10 times a day! :laugh:

I guess everyone's bodies are different. I just know what information the meter gives me personally. I think she just wanted a sense of what people are using the meters for.

clackley 10-23-2013 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rubidoux (Post 16654624)
Hmmm... I don't know about this. I feel like blood sugar and hunger are two very different things even in a person who has totally normal functioning and metabolism. I think if a normal healthy functioning person didn't eat all day, their blood sugar would probably just hang out between about 70 and 85, roughly. Your body should not be using up your blood sugar and running out, it should be making more as you need it, kwim?

What you say is true but not for those that have had episodes of hypoglycemia. Those that do have that symptom do much better on a low carb woe therefore keeping swings to a minimum. Testing blood glucose will only confirm that b.g. is low. This to me means that a person is adding in too many carbs and creating swings.

I have recently read that hypoglycemia are symptoms akin to prediabetic. Same problem with blood sugar regulation only on the opposite side. Best treatment is low carb. I guess then the only question would be 'how low'?

rubidoux 10-23-2013 01:40 PM

I guess I wouldn't consider those people to be normal healthy functioners. It is true that low blood sugar will make you feel hungry, and in the sense that your body is screaming for food, you are. And you should eat. But you can have a low blood sugar w a full stomach and a high or normal blood sugar after many hours of not eating. I guess the idea of testing to see if you were experiencing *true* hunger freaks me out. Maybe in Punkin's case true hunger and low blood sugar always coincide, but for most healthy people (and most people that have less than normal metabolism/insulin functioning, too) that should not be true.

clackley 10-23-2013 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rubidoux (Post 16655644)
I guess I wouldn't consider those people to be normal healthy functioners. It is true that low blood sugar will make you feel hungry, and in the sense that your body is screaming for food, you are. And you should eat. But you can have a low blood sugar w a full stomach and a high or normal blood sugar after many hours of not eating. I guess the idea of testing to see if you were experiencing *true* hunger freaks me out. Maybe in Punkin's case true hunger and low blood sugar always coincide, but for most healthy people (and most people that have less than normal metabolism/insulin functioning, too) that should not be true.

I think you are right in that something is amiss with people with hypoglycemic symptoms.

Leo41 10-23-2013 02:06 PM

It seems to me that a healthy person has more benign ways of testing whether or not the individual is experiencing 'true hunger' than testing blood sugar. Part of the reason I lost to goal and have been able to maintain for 3 years is that I learned to distinguish 'head hunger' from true physical hunger. (I sometimes indulge in the former, but I know that's what I'm doing.)

As to hypoglycemia, my Type 2 sister suffered from it for many years before the onset of diabetes, and she tells me that 1) anyone who suspects she/he is experiencing hypoglycemia should get a diagnosis confirmed by a physician (because it's so often a precursor of diabetes). 2) the 'feeling' of hypoglycemia is unmistakable to anyone who experiences it regularly (according to my sister), and the remedy is to immediately eat, so she would never waste time testing her BS during a hypoglycemic episode. Her focus is on raising her BS by eating something.

I totally understand the importance of diabetics regularly testing, but I just don't see the need for non-diabetics to test.

Punkin 10-24-2013 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rubidoux (Post 16655644)
I guess I wouldn't consider those people to be normal healthy functioners. It is true that low blood sugar will make you feel hungry, and in the sense that your body is screaming for food, you are. And you should eat. But you can have a low blood sugar w a full stomach and a high or normal blood sugar after many hours of not eating. I guess the idea of testing to see if you were experiencing *true* hunger freaks me out. Maybe in Punkin's case true hunger and low blood sugar always coincide, but for most healthy people (and most people that have less than normal metabolism/insulin functioning, too) that should not be true.

Yes I definitely do not have a healthy metabolism. I have managed to gain 60lbs in two years, by not paying attention to how much and what I was eating. I can eat a 2000 cal meal and an hour later be hungry again. This is what I consider to be "false" hunger. The monitor for me has proved to be very useful. However maybe for other people it isn't useful at all. I use it like a diabetic would, to try to keep my blood sugar within what is considered a normal range. Having said that though, I am most likely pre-diabetic.

Punkin 10-24-2013 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo41 (Post 16655696)
It seems to me that a healthy person has more benign ways of testing whether or not the individual is experiencing 'true hunger' than testing blood sugar. Part of the reason I lost to goal and have been able to maintain for 3 years is that I learned to distinguish 'head hunger' from true physical hunger. (I sometimes indulge in the former, but I know that's what I'm doing.)

As to hypoglycemia, my Type 2 sister suffered from it for many years before the onset of diabetes, and she tells me that 1) anyone who suspects she/he is experiencing hypoglycemia should get a diagnosis confirmed by a physician (because it's so often a precursor of diabetes). 2) the 'feeling' of hypoglycemia is unmistakable to anyone who experiences it regularly (according to my sister), and the remedy is to immediately eat, so she would never waste time testing her BS during a hypoglycemic episode. Her focus is on raising her BS by eating something.

I totally understand the importance of diabetics regularly testing, but I just don't see the need for non-diabetics to test.

That is odd because I tested once at 2.4mmol and wasn't even aware that my blood sugar was that low. I didn't even feel any need to eat at the time. Maybe it is because I was on a ketogenic diet at the time. I guess people just react differently. One of the scary things about my metabolism though, is that if I have a taste of something sweet my blood sugar starts to drop rapidly below normal. This I learned from testing! It made me realize that it might not be a good idea to do taste testing when baking for other people. Honestly I think the blood glucose meters can be very useful for some people, just maybe it depends on the person.

Janknitz 10-24-2013 12:36 PM

I have reactive hypoglycemia (yes, I AM pre diabetic). Low carb is a godsend because it really evens out my blood sugar and I'm not much of a cheater. Even so I occasionally get hypo symptoms and I DO test because about 50%of the time I'm not really low. I used to get a lot lower (down to 50 or 55) when I was a carbage eater. Whether I am going to "treat" the hypo or not depends on if its truly low. Sometimes the hypo symptoms are just reminding me to eat because I have gone too long (7 or 8 hours or more).

Psmileyf 10-24-2013 02:03 PM

All I have found out so far is that I usually fall somewhere in the 90s. And first thing in the morning I am right around 100.

Ronnie51 10-25-2013 10:54 AM

I'm not diabetic but my brother is and my grandmother was. My fasting BG always tested normal between high 80's & mid 90's, but after menopause, my A1c crept up to 5.9. At that point I decided to see what was going on so I bought a meter. I found that I am very sensitive to carbs; an hour after eating bread or pasta (or other simple carbs), my BG went as high as 170, but came down to 120 or lower after two hours (which is considered normal by the ADA, but it's not really). So, I cut out....or greatly reduced....my intake of carbs and got my A1c down to 5.5 with the help of a meter which showed me which foods spiked my BG. I can't seem to get my A1c below 5.5 which bothers me; I guess I could if I stopped all carbs, but I just don't have that in me...yet. Right now I'm content with an A1c of 5.5 but if it starts creeping up again I'll be more strict. By the way, I'm not...nor have I ever been....overweight. I currently weigh 106 lbs, and I've exercised consistently my entire life. But I am hypothyroid for which I take Synthroid (which developed after menopause), I also take BP and cholesterol meds. This is genetic as everyone in my family has elevated BP and cholesterol, but I'm the only one with a non functioning thyroid. So, using a meter has helped me learn how my body reacts to foods and to lower my A1c which is a very good thing. Your numbers sound great, by the way.


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