Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Reviews - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Eating and Exercise Plans > The Exercise Board
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-27-2014, 09:17 AM   #1
Senior LCF Member
 
Marvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 898
Gallery: Marvin
Stats: WT=410/345/225?
WOE: Atkins induction, Bernstein
Start Date: Which time?
Do you need more carbs at higher altitudes?

I'm planning an intermediate difficulty mountain hike later this summer in Colorado. We'll be starting about 9500 in elevation, and going up to about 12,300 over the course of 4.4 miles. FWIW, I currently live about 1000 ft about sea level. I've heard conventional wisdom say that with the lower oxygen content at higher elevations, you cannot burn fat very well, and your body needs extra carbs, and the carbs would need to be higher glycemic carbs than a LC person would normally want to do. I'm planning what I need to eat a day or two ahead of time and what food and snacks I'll want to pack for the hike itself.

I'm looking for some advice from someone who may have more firsthand experience, or more research-oriented knowledge. While the hike I'm doing certainly will be challenging, but it's not like I'm climbing Everest or Kilimanjaro, which it seems a lot of the research I've seen refers back to.

I realize that two issues are elevation sickness, and just plain running out of energy on the trip. I've done lesser hikes in the past, including one for 5 miles out and back, just shy of a 1000 ft climb up, with no snacks for the trip, and I really ran out of energy at the end. So I won't make that mistake again, but I want to fuel up correctly.

FWIW, I'm doing a pretty good training regimen, and eating low carb now, and hope to drop another 40 lbs before the trip. The trip is really a target to shoot for, that helps provide motivation for me here and now, but I do want to succeed. After we've done that, I've got my sights on a fourteener next summer.
__________________
Marvin

Last edited by Marvin; 05-27-2014 at 09:20 AM..
Marvin is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 05-27-2014, 10:44 AM   #2
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: South Texas
Posts: 671
Gallery: LESESKI
We go from Texas to Copper Mountain, CO every year to ski. I have noticed that we do eat more carbs while there or else we feel weak due to the altitude difference. However you can still eat as close to natural as possible, just add in protein bars. I do recommend going about 2 days before you plan to do any exercise so that your body can adjust to the altitude. And you will need to drink more water than usual.
LESESKI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2014, 07:17 AM   #3
Senior LCF Member
 
Marvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 898
Gallery: Marvin
Stats: WT=410/345/225?
WOE: Atkins induction, Bernstein
Start Date: Which time?
Thanks. That makes sense, and it makes sense to listen to your body.

One quick bump to see if anyone else has any comments....
Marvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2014, 08:15 AM   #4
Junior LCF Member
 
Bacon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 39
Gallery: Bacon
Stats: 185/151.6/145
WOE: Moderate carb, Paleo-ish
I live in Boulder, CO which is about a mile above sea level, and have been here for a little over a year after living at sea level in Maryland.

For hikes, stay hydrated! I've had some massive headaches post-hike due to not drinking enough water. I've found that I never really needed to up carbs significantly, but a little bit more than baseline seems to help--I like to bring beef jerky, nuts, and something more energy/carb dense (like a larabar or trail mix) for outdoor excursions. I eat normally before the hike.

It's generally a little harder to breathe or exert yourself at these altitudes. My first hike was really challenging! Take it easy.
Bacon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2014, 07:31 AM   #5
Senior LCF Member
 
Marvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 898
Gallery: Marvin
Stats: WT=410/345/225?
WOE: Atkins induction, Bernstein
Start Date: Which time?
Thanks Bacon. I do think I will eat a few more "ok" carbs the night before, like sweet potatoes, and I'm thinking about dried fruit like dried apricots or peaches if I need quick energy on the trail. I'm told anything with a pit is glucose, which you can use at higher altitudes, whereas things like apples, etc with seeds are fructose, which you cannot metabolize as well at a lower oxygen content. Basically, I just want to "not run out of gas" on the trail.
Marvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2014, 06:16 AM   #6
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 9,575
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/166/175 Trying again...223/211/146 5'7
WOE: Misc.
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
How long are you going to be at elevation before you start hiking? Give yourself some time to acclimate. At least overnight, two would be better.

I've done a fair amount of hiking at 8-9k feet (I live literally AT sea level, I can see the sea right now) and I did eat more carbs. I like Lara bars and oatmeal with nuts and coconut oil before I go (try coconut oil out at home before you go if you aren't used to it). Trail mix is good, the dried fruit gives you instant energy and the nuts carry you longer.

Make a good plan for dinner that night. You will likely be HUNGRY and nothing tastes as good as post-hike food.
__________________
Gina

3/24/14- She is Beautiful 10k- I won!, 7/27/14- Wharf to Wharf (6 miles)- I won!
9/14/14- Title 9K- I won!
11/9/14- Surfer's Path 10K, 4/12/15- Santa Cruz Half Marathon

*My definition of win: I didn't quit, didn't throw up, and they didn't close the course on me.
GME is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2014, 06:21 AM   #7
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 9,575
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/166/175 Trying again...223/211/146 5'7
WOE: Misc.
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
Do you have good boots? My first thought was how hard all that elevation climb will be, but that is a lot of downhill, which is easier on the lungs, but harder on the body. Make sure your boots will hold your foot in the right spot on an incline and not jam up your toes and be careful of your knees. I would use a hiking stick (or two) too.
GME is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2014, 07:21 AM   #8
Senior LCF Member
 
Marvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 898
Gallery: Marvin
Stats: WT=410/345/225?
WOE: Atkins induction, Bernstein
Start Date: Which time?
Gina,
Thanks for the reply. We will be there a day before the climb. I wanted to wait an extra day, but DW wants to go the 2nd day we are there.

Yes, I think trail mix (making our own) with dried fruit, chocolate and nuts will be a good thing for the hike. Probably carry a bar or two as it will be lengthy. And lots of water.

We both have decent hiking boots. We learned our lesson on a lesser climb a few years ago. Coming down a very rocky trail, I had good boots, and my wife had sneakers. I came down easily, but it was very rugged for her, and she really had to be tentative. We also use walking sticks which probably help a lot more on the way down than the way up.
Marvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2014, 07:46 AM   #9
GME
Big Yapper!!!!
 
GME's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CA Coast
Posts: 9,575
Gallery: GME
Stats: 250/166/175 Trying again...223/211/146 5'7
WOE: Misc.
Start Date: April 2000 (the first time)
Enjoy yourself. It sounds like a lot of fun.

I have been thinking I would like to hike Mt Whitney for my 50th birthday in a couple of years, but the DH doesn't think I will have as good a time as I think I will. He keeps telling me, "You know you have to pack out your poo, don't you?" He is the one that was the big-time backpacker and talked me into this stuff years ago.
GME is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2014, 08:54 AM   #10
Senior LCF Member
 
Marvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 898
Gallery: Marvin
Stats: WT=410/345/225?
WOE: Atkins induction, Bernstein
Start Date: Which time?
That sounds like fun! I like carrying my own poo! LOL.

Seriously, ours is a day hike, but it's a fairly difficult one. It's the most challenging one we've done, but we're on a good trajectory to be in the best shape we've been in years, and that will help.
Marvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2014, 10:35 PM   #11
Major LCF Poster!
 
westside's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Olympic Valley, CA
Posts: 2,696
Gallery: westside
Stats: Start 199/186/175
Start Date: 2/17/12
on your 1st post. If you are going to eat carbs, you don't need to eat them a day or two ahead. You can take some in during your hike. Electrolyte drink, bars, trail mix w/dried fruit, chocolate, Pay Day Bars etc....

About altitude, if you are not altitude acclimated, it all depends, with everything being equal, you're always better to keep your exercise effort at the lower range of your exercise heart rate. If you are use to burning fat a sea level you probably wont suck any more at altitude than someone who is equally as trained and use to burning carbs at sea level.

About altitude, your body demanding more sugar at altitude progresses at a much steeper geometric rate than at sea level as your heart rate increases but this isn't set in stone and can vary with the individual.

Example of the geometric effect with heart rate increasing:

Racing at altitude. Some people will run marathons at altitude even though they live at sea level. Something like the Lake Tahoe Marathon at 6,200 feet. The course is rolling maybe something like the Big Sur Marathon at sea level. If you run it easy, you wont have the best time but maybe it's only 5%-7% less than the time you would run an equally difficult course at sea level.

If you run a mile race at full effort at altitude, the drop off in your best time might be less that 5%-7%. The reason being is that a mile race is run at an anaerobic effort, who needs oxygen. Its over relatively quickly

If you run a 5k race at altitude it will hurt but your time, because a 5k race has some anaerobic component, might not be in the 5-7% range.

If your run a 10k race at altitude at full effort, watch out. The 10k race race is run at your lactate threshold or just above. This is your maximum aerobic effort and you are really on the ragged edge., even at sea level. When you get past 5k, 6-7k things can really start hurting. Try running your best effort at the 10k at altitude and you might be past the 5%-7% for your best time. Feeding more carbs and your body reaching for sugar will only increase the propensity for your muscles to shut down.

As for altitude acclimation. Lore says to go to altitude and take a day or 2 to adjust. What actually happens is that you start to decline as soon as you get to altitude. Your blood starts to lose red blood cells or maybe it's white blood cells, I forget. After 3 days your body starts to reverse this process and you begin to build up more blood cells and after 14 days you reach some reasonable acclimation but full acclimation will take at least 3 months. This is a reason why some exercise lore says to go to altitude on the day of and have at it but there might be a psychological component for taking a day or two and that might override the decline in physiology relative to performance. The mind rules.

Always start out easy and see how it goes, especially on the uphills.

I'm going to do a solo through the Desolation Wilderness at Lake Tahoe next week. 28 miles. I'm just coming back from an injury and this will be my first long outing in a while. I live at altitude.
__________________
Bill

Last edited by westside; 07-18-2014 at 10:48 PM..
westside is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:11 PM.


Copyright ©1999-2014 Friends Forums LLC. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Friends Forums, LLC.