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-   -   Lo carb runners, what do you eat/drink during long runs? Natural food only. (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/exercise-board/809551-lo-carb-runners-what-do-you-eat-drink-during-long-runs-natural-food-only.html)

whitehorse 08-06-2013 12:40 AM

Lo carb runners, what do you eat/drink during long runs? Natural food only.
 
I have been trying to read up on low carb fuel during long distance runs. However, the most info I seems to get are around gels and stuff that I am not too keen to try at all.

I am training for my first marathon in jan and as I am a newbie, I wont be running the whole way nor will I be racing fast. Its going to be slow & steady.
I also have another 70k in feb, but unless I can get my head around food & drink options while I am on the move for 10 hours+ I may have to call it off. :(

I am interested to know what kind of low carb snacks & natural home made drinks you use to fuel yourself during a long distance endurance race. Would be great if you would post only stuff that is natural & easily available please :)

Thanx

westside 08-07-2013 10:54 PM

Marathon distance or ultra distance, the best fuel is being able to burn your own fat and that is done through miles and training

westside 08-07-2013 11:04 PM

In an ultra distance event, for a kick in the butt, in the last third of the race , try chicken broth and then flat(decarbonated) coke. Put coke in a bowl and whip is up then pour it or let it sit for a while. regular coke will do in a pinch.

Really.... you never want to get to up tight on what works. You want to be able to burn your own fat and the only successful measure I see is through training. Diet will only get you so far. The diet that you eat outside of exercise is more important than what you eat while exercising. The diet that you eat while exercising needs to be fine tuned on your own.

westside 08-07-2013 11:25 PM

I've read primal blueprint and while I agree with mark on his overall eating plan, I'm not sure I agree with him on exercise science. Mark is about my age and he was in his 20's and on top of his game, everything was go hard. I'm not sure he understands the principles of recovery. He seems to have gone over to easy a very much moderate approach to exercise.

Recovery: Taking breaks while interval training/

Recovery: The hard/easy training principle, a hard day is followed by an easy day.

Recovery: Block training, 11-14 days or 3 week of steady training is followed by a recovery block at 14 days or a week of cutback after 3 weeks.

Recovery: After an A race, you take some recovery. You run 2 'A' races a year.

Recovery: The Endocrine System Reboot; you walk away from it all for while, maybe a month, maybe 2 months. do something different but no focused or hard training. Fall off a bar stool if you feel like it. When you start up again, you rebuild a base, just easy for 6-8 weeks.

You need to get through this last stage of recovery before you go back to intervals

westside 08-08-2013 12:04 AM

The endocrine system reboot phase of recovery is hard for obsessive compulsive type runners and they can be susceptible to overtraining (syndrome). I've also seen some mellow type, ultra runners who just keep on running and racing. If you're well trained, ultra might seem easy because you can run fairly fast at an easy pace but all those hours at an easy pace will catch up with you. I've seen a fair amount what I think is adrenal fatigue in some high end and not so high end ultra runners.

batlou 08-13-2013 11:54 AM

Nutrition for endurance athletes is a very personal thing and can only being learned, as Westside pointed out, through training. You should approach your nutrition and practice it just as diligently as your run training.

My personal experience was to use Infinit mix, I could personalize it I become hyper sensitive to flavors during exercise, along with gels. I will also agree again with Westside on the chicken broth and coke. I am convinced that about 20 lays potato chips and 6 or 8 oz of flat coke salvaged my first Ironman race. After 8+ hours of gels and energy drinks the thought of any sweet made me sick.

There are entire books devoted to just nutrition but the take away from all of them are going to be practice, practice, practice.

Keep us posted on your training as well. I took this year off from racing but already planning my 2014 race calendar.

batlou 08-13-2013 12:08 PM

Hah, something popped in my head after I posted. Just to give you an idea of how individual it can be. Last year I trained with a guy that would keep a couple burrito's wrapped in foil in his cycling jersey. He would eat both of them throughout the day on 100 mile rides. It was really gross and we always joked that there would be no drafting off of him but it worked for him.

Fitterly 09-10-2013 06:53 AM

Wow
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by westside (Post 16550611)
The endocrine system reboot phase of recovery is hard for obsessive compulsive type runners and they can be susceptible to overtraining (syndrome). I've also seen some mellow type, ultra runners who just keep on running and racing. If you're well trained, ultra might seem easy because you can run fairly fast at an easy pace but all those hours at an easy pace will catch up with you. I've seen a fair amount what I think is adrenal fatigue in some high end and not so high end ultra runners.

Such a cool post. Well it's marathon season and I'm watching the boss at work prep for a marathon I ran. His best was 3:03. After a long break I proclaim base layering. I'm just laying bricks. I can kick out a six miler but my hip joints are shot. So it's going to be three or 4x a week for me and bike on off days and a day of recovery with ramp up every two weeks.

Maybe by spring I can drop five pounds and do a 10k.

westside 09-13-2013 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fitterly (Post 16597764)
Such a cool post. Well it's marathon season and I'm watching the boss at work prep for a marathon I ran. His best was 3:03. After a long break I proclaim base layering. I'm just laying bricks. I can kick out a six miler but my hip joints are shot. So it's going to be three or 4x a week for me and bike on off days and a day of recovery with ramp up every two weeks.

Maybe by spring I can drop five pounds and do a 10k.

Hi Jen

My hip flexors and/or lack of flexing were the problem with my knee issues that I've been dealing with for the past 18 months. You're too young to have 'shot joints'. I actually had no pain whatsoever in my hips. I'm just now starting to build mileage. I plan on 10 miles this Sunday along a ridgetop. Everything seems like a distant memory.

Fitterly 09-16-2013 06:20 PM

Hi Tough Guy,

Meh, my joints suck. It runs in my family. Mom had hip replacement last year. Dad has arthritis in both feet, sister, grandma. It's pretty great. I started running slower and it's lovely. I just don't have enough time to run as long as I want to. I think the ideal run for me is like 6 miles but I only have time to do like 4.8 or so in the hills around here. Average elevation gain for me in a run in my neighborhood is like 500 ft. Maybe that's nothing for a daily run though. The first mile and a half out the door is straight up hill. I'm used to it but I'm wondering if the downhill is rough on me? Not sure.

Before my oral surgery I started up running again about 4x a week. Some days i'll split half bike half run. Again, I'd love to run longer, I just don't have ample time like I did in the days of grad school.

westside 09-21-2013 09:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by whitehorse (Post 16547452)
I also have another 70k in feb, but unless I can get my head around food & drink options while I am on the move for 10 hours+ I may have to call it off. :(

You need to get you're head around for moving forward in a 70k, #$%#W$ the food and drink options.

I'll come back to this later.

westside 09-21-2013 09:46 PM

Actually, training and getting you're head around it, ride the same elevator.

michelle 10-01-2013 08:17 AM

Great advice to avoid a bonk!

Jigglebuster 10-09-2013 12:57 PM

I know you're trying to get your head in the game and gain your confidence, and yes it does sound like you're trying to gain that by feeling in control of your food. In the end though it is about your training and seeing yourself make gains. the more gains, the less you'll be relying on your food. A line will be crossed as far as the focus is concerned. You'll find you actually need less than you need (kind of like packing a bag for a weekend).

In saying all this, women tend to need more iron and minerals when it comes to long distance events. I don't do marathons, in fact, I don't run all that much, but I do do thru-hiking, and I discovered one thing that helped me immensely, and gave me that little boost to get me going another few hours.... Dulse. It's a seaweed. I just eat about a tablespoon worth, and I'm ready to go again! It goes great with dates too. There's something about having those minerals that gives you not necessarily energy per say, but drive. Then you can focus on your technique and develop your stamina.

I hope this helps! :)

batlou 10-10-2013 11:18 AM

...I think he/she is gone.

Jigglebuster 10-14-2013 12:07 PM

Well, maybe this can help someone else then.

michelle 10-18-2013 03:47 PM

helped me!


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