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Ronnie51 01-19-2014 05:46 PM

"Diabetes & You" Magazine....WTH?
 
I don't have diabetes but my brother does and I'm very carb sensitive, so I'm always reading about diabetes. I picked up a copy of "Diabetes & you" magazine from Walgreens today and found an article titled "Swaps for Healthier Eating". The article starts off by saying that high fat foods can spike your blood sugar several hours later. Is that true? Then it listed some foods you may like to eat and their suggested alternatives. These caught my eye:

In place of--- Try this instead
Full fat cheese--- Reduced-fat, low fat or fat free varieties

Half & Half--- Fat free half & half; or non dairy low fat creamer

Regular salad dressing--- Balsamic vinegar;or lowfat or fatfree salad dressing

Sour cream--- Fat-free or reduced fat sour cream

Whole milk yogurt--- Low fat or fat free

Nuts--- Crunchy cereal nuggets (fat free granola)

So.....is this correct? I just switched from low fat half & half to regular. Should I switch back? And granola is better than nuts? I'm CONFUSED. :dunno:

GME 01-19-2014 05:55 PM

I'm going to go out on a limb and guess all the advertisers are processed food companies and diabetes medication providers. They are mistaken and best and trying to keep people ill at worst.

Keep your half and half, or switch to cream.

helenback 01-19-2014 06:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronnie51 (Post 16764499)
I don't have diabetes but my brother does and I'm very carb sensitive, so I'm always reading about diabetes. I picked up a copy of "Diabetes & you" magazine from Walgreens today and found an article titled "Swaps for Healthier Eating". The article starts off by saying that high fat foods can spike your blood sugar several hours later. Is that true? Then it listed some foods you may like to eat and their suggested alternatives. These caught my eye:

In place of--- Try this instead
Full fat cheese--- Reduced-fat, low fat or fat free varieties

Half & Half--- Fat free half & half; or non dairy low fat creamer

Regular salad dressing--- Balsamic vinegar;or lowfat or fatfree salad dressing

Sour cream--- Fat-free or reduced fat sour cream

Whole milk yogurt--- Low fat or fat free

Nuts--- Crunchy cereal nuggets (fat free granola)

So.....is this correct? I just switched from low fat half & half to regular. Should I switch back? And granola is better than nuts? I'm CONFUSED. :dunno:

Oh no, no, no... Never, ever, ever eat those foods on the right. Every single one of the "try this instead" foods are evil! In fact, those foods are a huge part of why there is a diabetes epidemic in the world.

My head spins 360 degrees when I read articles like this!! ugh!!

Sorry, didn't mean to get carried away, this type of stuff in mags and books just drives me insane.

Get Dr Bernstein's Diabetes Solution (it is technical but is the best book around for learning the truth about diabetes) but I'm here to tell you, if you and your brother even come close to following his eating suggestions it will go a LONG way towards making your brother's life and your own much healthier.

(edited to add: Of course, this is just my opinion.. :D )
Good luck! :D

MFriend 01-20-2014 07:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronnie51 (Post 16764499)
I don't have diabetes but my brother does and I'm very carb sensitive, so I'm always reading about diabetes. I picked up a copy of "Diabetes & you" magazine from Walgreens today and found an article titled "Swaps for Healthier Eating". The article starts off by saying that high fat foods can spike your blood sugar several hours later. Is that true? ....

If that article actually says that fat can spike your bG several hours later they have to know they are lying. The human body is unable to convert fat into glucose. (some protein can be converted into glucose through a process int he liver called 'glucogenesis... but never fat). If I ate the recommended ADA number of carbs I'd never get my blood glucose under control!

Jrw85705 01-20-2014 07:41 AM

I have never seen a diabetes magazine that didnít propose the exact things you are talking about. I want to scream every time I pick one up. I keep reading them hoping I will find one that actually makes sense.

When I followed their advise I became almost 90 pounds overweight and was in terrible physical condition. I kept trying to tweak the diet to make it work but I learned you ďcanít fix stupidĒ. Itís like trying to tweak 2 + 2 to make it 5. Just doesnít work.

For me the only thing that worked was following Dr. Bernsteinís Diabetes Solution. And it really, really worked. My primary care, my cardiologist and my rheumatologist are all please and behind what I am doing. And to put it bluntly, I not dead but thriving.

I would never tell anyone how to treat their diabetes but I will always share what has worked for me. And if someone else has a different method thatís great but show me the proof it works, without adding tons of medications.

Ronnie51 01-20-2014 09:37 AM

I appreciate all your comments. When my A1c started to creep up and reached 5.9, even though my doctor was unconcerned, I bought a meter and tested myself to see what was going on. Sure enough, I learned I was very sensitive to carbs. I cut out pasta, potatoes, crackers, my favorite cereal (shredded wheat), processed foods. I do eat a slice of bread occasionally, but rarely. Anyway, my last A1c was 5.5 and I'm hoping to get it even lower. But my brother...who has had diabetes for 20 years as a result of his doctor prescribing high dose steroids without monitoring his glucose....has a terrible diet. He just won't listen to me when I try to tell him how bad his diet is. The other day he called me from the car and told me that he was stopping for a cheeseburger (he eats the roll) and fries. He doesn't feel good and his last A1c was 8, yet he will not listen to me. It breaks my heart. For the life of me, I don't understand why the ADA continues to pontificate "healthy whole grains" and reduced fat products when years of that kind of eating has caused an epidemic of diabetes. :sad:

girondet 01-20-2014 03:11 PM

Here is what happens and causes confusion:

If I eat lasagna with lots of cheese, not the leanest beef, I get a blood sugar spike 3-4 hours later......the fat delayed the blood sugar spike I would have gotten an hour later from all those carbs. A helpful thing really, if am going to eat all those carbs anyway. The blood sugar spike is lower and a bit more leveled out over several hours because the fat slowed it down.

If I had eaten only the fat and protein, much lower blood sugar for me over the whole period.

Fat gets blamed unfairly.

This kind of thing is discussed in the South Beach Diet book. He says if you are going to eat cake cheesecake is much better than angel food cake......full fat ice cream is better than ice milk, etc. for blood sugar.

No one demonizes beans and lentils. Same thing happens with them. In that case the delay and leveling is praised. :confused:

Aomiel 01-21-2014 08:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jrw85705 (Post 16765078)
I would never tell anyone how to treat their diabetes but I will always share what has worked for me. And if someone else has a different method thatís great but show me the proof it works, without adding tons of medications.


And there's the kicker. The diabetes community and those who buy into their advice, believe that the ADA diet *is* controlling their diabetes...even though they still have to take medication and/or their medication increases over time despite being compliant.

sarahatl 01-22-2014 09:44 AM

When you eat carbohydrates and fat doesn't that cause high cholesterol? I understand if you eat minimum carbs and high fat it is OK but what about some carbs (say 100) and eating fat as well. Is that OK?

girondet 01-22-2014 04:48 PM

I think our bodies are all different. I can do what you describe and have my cholesterol be ok, but my blood sugar runs too high and I gain weight. We all have a different carb tolerance and have to figure that out. My carb tolerance is 50-60g and that's if I don't do dairy.

dawnyama 01-22-2014 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aomiel (Post 16766804)
And there's the kicker. The diabetes community and those who buy into their advice, believe that the ADA diet *is* controlling their diabetes...even though they still have to take medication and/or their medication increases over time despite being compliant.

And docs who recommend that :stars: I was explaining to my daughter's endocrinologist "well, we can just watch/limit her carbs to lower her blood sugar" and I got this as a response "No we don't have to do that". They wanted her to increase her insulin, not remedy the reason she needs so much in the first place (my daughter has type 1 and is insulin dependent). Mind boggling, just crazy :stars:

Madmarsha 01-22-2014 05:06 PM

That is completely backwards.

Quote:

For the life of me, I don't understand why the ADA continues to pontificate "healthy whole grains" and reduced fat products when years of that kind of eating has caused an epidemic of diabetes
Well, the reason none of that stuff has worked is because we're all stupid and haven't heard this advice a million times and haven't all tried to eat that way for a long time and the stores and restaurants aren't full of low fat fare. Nope, we're all still eating full fat because you just can't find low fat versions of ANYTHING anywhere. Of course, that doesn't explain why it's easy to almost ACCIDENTALLY eat low fat sometimes or have to endure big eyes when I insist, YES, I AM SURE I DON'T WANT THAT IN LOW FAT. I mean, if NOBODY is eat low fat, I wouldn't get quizzed on it. They'd ASSUME I want full fat.

DABG 01-22-2014 07:21 PM

the drug companies are in business to TREAT diabetes--NOT to cure it! Just think, if all the millions of diabetics worldwide were cured, Big Pharma would lose money and that would be awful--for their stockholders anyhow!

A friend with diabetes was told by her doc that she could have 50 grams of carb with each of her 3 main meals.:eek: (he told her she was on enough insulin to 'take care of it.":mad: ) If I ate that much crap with each meal, I'd be dead or have a stroke in short order.

Some day in the super market when you have a bit of extra time, take a look at a few pages in a couple of the diabetic living magazines. They are downright scarey because I see peeps buying them--and then they go home and believe the propaganda in them and eat that way and wonder why they are getting sicker and keep needing more meds.. It is too sad!

watcher513 01-23-2014 10:52 PM

When my hubby was dx'd Type 2 Diabetic 8 years ago, the nutritionist told him to eat 45-75 carbs Per Meal. That's Crazy. That is one of the reasons I'm Still reading and finding ways to lower his blood sugar. His A1C was at 5.8 last time but I"m always trying to get it lower. He takes no meds as they bothered him (Met.).

Nikixie 01-25-2014 06:34 AM

I am newly diagnosed and got a big packet in the mail yesterday from my Dr's office...pamphlets telling me to replace meat with beans and such. :stars: I immediately thought of this thread :)

Also, my Dr wants me to go to the diabetes education classes to learn about checking my blood sugar and all that. $900 and 3 sessions not covered by my insurance to have an overweight nurse tell me I should be eating whole grains. Ugh. I'm supposed to bring in 3 days worth of a food log too. This should be interesting.

Janknitz 01-26-2014 10:20 AM

You're going to waste $900???? The standard diabetes ed is no better than those magazines. I'd make a deal with your doctor that if you can't get your blood glucose within normal range (the standard ranges are SO high that this is really no challenge with a well-formulated low carb diet) in 3 months, THEN you'll agree to this class.

If you do low carb well, at the end of 3 months, your results should far exceed anyone's expectations for that class. :hyst:

if you waste time and money in the class and get your spectacular results on low carb anyway, they'll pat themselves on the back and let the lousy diabetes ed get the credit for your results.

Read Bernstein and learn how to use the meter his way. It's not rocket science and we can help here if you have questions.

Janknitz 01-26-2014 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sarahatl (Post 16768368)
When you eat carbohydrates and fat doesn't that cause high cholesterol? I understand if you eat minimum carbs and high fat it is OK but what about some carbs (say 100) and eating fat as well. Is that OK?

There is no simple answer to this question.

When you reduce your carbs and change out polyunsaturated fats for better fats (animal fats, coconut oil, and olive oil--avoid processed nut and seed oils!) your HDL cholesterol will go up. That's a good thing, it should be over 60.

HDL cholesterol is part of the equation used to determine total cholesterol, so your total cholesterol may go up. Most doctors look at this and panic, they think it's bad for your total cholesterol to rise. But studies show that 50% of people who have cardiovascular events have LOW total cholesterol. So it doesn't really mean anything UNLESS it's getting in the range of 300 or higher (which may indicate another problem called familial hypercholesterolemia).

Triglyclerides should fall precipitously, ideally much lower than 100. That's a really good thing--triglycerides are probably the best indicator o cardiovascular risk.

LDL may go up, or remain about the same. This is known as "bad cholesterol" and will freak your doctor out. But an increase in LDL may not be so bad. There are two type of cholesterol particles--large fluffy ones are good, small, dense ones are a problem. If the large fluffy ones go up, that's a good thing, but the usual cholesterol tests don't distinguish between the large fluffy and small dense types. So just worrying about LDL numbers is meaningless. And as we age, women who have higher LDL cholesterols live longer, healthier lives because LDL is protective against cancer and against infection. Furthermore, cholesterol lowering drugs like statins don't improve women's health or longevity EVER. They do increase the risk of dementia, diabetes, and muscle problems. So if your blood glucose does go up on low carb, you need to educate yourself before agreeing to take the statin your doctor will want to push on you.

Often LDL goes up at first because all the fat in your body is being mobilized in the bloodstream. After weight loss stabilizes, the LDL may come down. So an increase in LDL with low carb is not unusual and in most cases it is not the problem you will be led to believe.

You are correct that the combination of too many carbs (and that amount differs person to person) PLUS saturated fat is a bad thing. So the best approach is to limit the carbs--we don't need much for a healthful life.

Madmarsha 01-26-2014 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Janknitz (Post 16774142)
There is no simple answer to this question.

When you reduce your carbs and change out polyunsaturated fats for better fats (animal fats, coconut oil, and olive oil--avoid processed nut and seed oils!) your HDL cholesterol will go up. That's a good thing, it should be over 60.

HDL cholesterol is part of the equation used to determine total cholesterol, so your total cholesterol may go up. Most doctors look at this and panic, they think it's bad for your total cholesterol to rise. But studies show that 50% of people who have cardiovascular events have LOW total cholesterol. So it doesn't really mean anything UNLESS it's getting in the range of 300 or higher (which may indicate another problem called familial hypercholesterolemia).

Triglyclerides should fall precipitously, ideally much lower than 100. That's a really good thing--triglycerides are probably the best indicator o cardiovascular risk.

LDL may go up, or remain about the same. This is known as "bad cholesterol" and will freak your doctor out. But an increase in LDL may not be so bad. There are two type of cholesterol particles--large fluffy ones are good, small, dense ones are a problem. If the large fluffy ones go up, that's a good thing, but the usual cholesterol tests don't distinguish between the large fluffy and small dense types. So just worrying about LDL numbers is meaningless. And as we age, women who have higher LDL cholesterols live longer, healthier lives because LDL is protective against cancer and against infection. Furthermore, cholesterol lowering drugs like statins don't improve women's health or longevity EVER. They do increase the risk of dementia, diabetes, and muscle problems. So if your blood glucose does go up on low carb, you need to educate yourself before agreeing to take the statin your doctor will want to push on you.

Often LDL goes up at first because all the fat in your body is being mobilized in the bloodstream. After weight loss stabilizes, the LDL may come down. So an increase in LDL with low carb is not unusual and in most cases it is not the problem you will be led to believe.

You are correct that the combination of too many carbs (and that amount differs person to person) PLUS saturated fat is a bad thing. So the best approach is to limit the carbs--we don't need much for a healthful life.

:goodpost: Best concise explanation of the cholesterol situation.

dawnyama 01-26-2014 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nikixie (Post 16772458)
I am newly diagnosed and got a big packet in the mail yesterday from my Dr's office...pamphlets telling me to replace meat with beans and such. :stars: I immediately thought of this thread :)

Also, my Dr wants me to go to the diabetes education classes to learn about checking my blood sugar and all that. $900 and 3 sessions not covered by my insurance to have an overweight nurse tell me I should be eating whole grains. Ugh. I'm supposed to bring in 3 days worth of a food log too. This should be interesting.

Are you type 1 or type 2? For my daughter who is a type 1 insulin requiring diabetic, she had to attend some nutrition classes so she could get her pump. The doctor had to sign off on the prescription for it, and 1 of the criteria for getting it. So she HAD to attend. No ifs ands or buts. I just told my daughter that "No, butter was not evil" and that she would not be eating bananas as snacks :stars: Thankfully her classes WERE covered under our insurance. We didn't receive a bill for it. Sometimes these things are voluntary, some times they are not. If it is NOT mandatory, I would soooo save my $900. Just not worth it in my opinion.

shebasmudder 01-26-2014 07:06 PM

Wow, that article was horrific ! :stars:

I have never gone to the nutritionist's meetings offered by my ex-doctors. Once they caught me at an appointment. I remember the young lady suggesting I have low-fat yogurt. I told her I only ate greek yogurt because of the high sugar content of low-fat. I doubt it changed either of our lives.

whoknew 01-29-2014 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nikixie (Post 16772458)
I am newly diagnosed and got a big packet in the mail yesterday from my Dr's office...pamphlets telling me to replace meat with beans and such. :stars: I immediately thought of this thread :)

Also, my Dr wants me to go to the diabetes education classes to learn about checking my blood sugar and all that. $900 and 3 sessions not covered by my insurance to have an overweight nurse tell me I should be eating whole grains. Ugh. I'm supposed to bring in 3 days worth of a food log too. This should be interesting.

I love my doc! She told me my diabetes classes were $800 and no insurance coverage, but she felt I was smart enough to handle it on my own! My A1C went from 10.7 to 5.3 in 9 months of low carb. I average(d) 30 carbs per day. I do not do sugar, corn syrups, beans, grains, etc. I do eat low carb bread products on occasion, and that helps. Fortunately, she is not a big supporter of the diabetes diet being paraded around as good for us. She has even asked me (I've lost about 100 lbs on low carb) for advice, recipes, suggestions on how I've done it and stuck with it.

Best to all of us fighting against the current! I figure if the salmon can do it, by golly, I can, too!

whoknew 01-29-2014 11:06 AM

Ooops, too late to edit! I got my A1C to 5.8 not 5.3 -- should have worn my glasses!!!:o

diwitch 02-02-2014 06:00 PM

In 2008 a staph infection (misdiagnosed, untreated for 3 weeks) zapped my pancreatic function. Virtually overnight (at 48 years old) I became a type one insulin dependent diabetic. I had been low carb (most of the time) since my early 20's. They of course gave me the typical ADA diet and recited horror stories of what could happen if I did not follow it. I did, to the letter although I knew I was going to gain weight, which I did. That was bad enough, but it did not (even with 5 insulin injections a day) get my blood sugar under any kind of reasonable control.

After much research, I chucked the ADA diet went back to low carb, got everything stabilized, blood sugar wise and weight wise. Then I started reading about not just LC, but low carb, high fat.

I am now down to one shot a day, sometimes none. My BG is stable, my weight is stable and my pancreas shows small signs of coming back to life.

The ADA can keep that *diet*. Give me bacon and cream!

Di

Ronnie51 02-02-2014 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by whoknew (Post 16778376)
Ooops, too late to edit! I got my A1C to 5.8 not 5.3 -- should have worn my glasses!!!:o

Still very impressive!:)

Ronnie51 02-02-2014 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by diwitch (Post 16784100)
In 2008 a staph infection (misdiagnosed, untreated for 3 weeks) zapped my pancreatic function. Virtually overnight (at 48 years old) I became a type one insulin dependent diabetic. I had been low carb (most of the time) since my early 20's. They of course gave me the typical ADA diet and recited horror stories of what could happen if I did not follow it. I did, to the letter although I knew I was going to gain weight, which I did. That was bad enough, but it did not (even with 5 insulin injections a day) get my blood sugar under any kind of reasonable control.

After much research, I chucked the ADA diet went back to low carb, got everything stabilized, blood sugar wise and weight wise. Then I started reading about not just LC, but low carb, high fat.

I am now down to one shot a day, sometimes none. My BG is stable, my weight is stable and my pancreas shows small signs of coming back to life.

The ADA can keep that *diet*. Give me bacon and cream!

Di

Congratulations to you on this amazing accomplishment! You are proof that the "healthy whole grain" low fat diet preached for years by the ADA DOES NOT WORK. I wish mainstream medicine would get on the ball already...yes, the drums are beating out there and more and more people are getting the word, but it's just too slow a process.

diwitch 02-03-2014 07:29 AM

Thank you Ronnie, I help run a FB group dedicated to beating that particular drum. We just had a member post his latest blood work. In SIX weeks, his triglycerides dropped from 712 to 191. Needless to say..he was a bit excited.:jumpjoy:

We also recently had a diabetes educator join us! Just one and she is not wholly convinced, yet, but she has an open mind and is having a hard time arguing with the results we have been getting.

BTW, the above test results, while a bit more dramatic than most, are by no means uncommon.

Di

Sarahkitty 02-05-2014 10:00 AM

Hi everyone!
My first post here, although I have been purchasing from Netrition for years.
Just want to say I totally agree with all your posts, and would reply to each one with a nod and smile and a yay, glad you wrote that post.
It is criminal what's going on for diabetics Not in the know. No wonder diabetes has such alarming statistics -with all the misinformation out there, esp. from 'diabetic' mags, recipe sources, doctors, and the dreaded 'classes' that will almost insure a new diabetic will struggle for years until they wise up.
Fortunately when I went to the 'class', (you know the one) where the 'counselor' spends copious amounts of time talking about bread, grains, cereals, potatoes, and tells you it's ok to have one slice of bread or roll and one serving of potatoes and a small desert at each meal and you want to fall off the chair laughing, I knew that was misinformation it it's best.
I too, like many of you, have been on this journey for years. My success has mainly been due to these factors: 1: Netrition, where I can purchase truly edible foods and condiments, small servings, refusing foods that are sugar laden, and,well, that's about it.
I stopped doing one metformin a day and cut it down to half on my own sense that I could. The last time I saw a doctor, she brought me down to one quarter of a pill each day. Yay. Then I got a God complex and kind of slipped -doing some occasional binges with Cheetos, lol, until it finally occurred to me that the next time I would see the doctor, I'd likely have to go back to half a pill again -let everybody down. My Grandmother had diabetes. I remember how she would pile her plate up with food, like a pyramid in Gaza. At that time, all they had for sweetener were little white pills.
My husband's friend took me out to eat -he complained later to my husband that I ate like the proverbial bird and barely ate. (no fun to take out for lunch, iow.s)
I think portion control is so important, and staggered eating.
My husband has finally taken it upon himself to help me -(it's so easy to forget all the things you have to know). I think we as diabetics so much need support, which is why this forum is so important for all of us. I could go on, but I've already wasted 3 minutes of your time. -So glad to read all your posts -enlightening and thoroughly readable each one.

Ronnie51 02-05-2014 02:36 PM

Sarahkitty, your post certainly did not waste 3 minutes of my time; it added more good, helpful information in one post than the ADA has been preaching for years. Thank you!

Sarahkitty 02-06-2014 12:06 PM

Thank you Ronnie -we're all in this together. I remember the first time I found a 'diabetic' recipe book online..naturally I headed to the dessert section first. As one person wrote, "what are you trying to do, kill me?" -adequately summed up those horrible sugar laden desserts dripping with starch, sugar, a beautiful picture of a cake none of us would go ten feet of. (where's my cross and holy water)

I would very much like to see this ADA 'Food Pyramid' as a thread starter on it's own. I would like to read everyone's take on it.
Unbelievable is my assessment. As I am new to the forum, I'm not yet comfortable to start a thread.

Ronnie51 02-06-2014 01:30 PM

Here is an excerpt from the ADA Diabetes Food Pyramid :

Under this plan, 60 to 70 percent of your total daily calories should come from grains, beans, and starchy vegetables, with the rest being meat, cheese, fish and other proteins. Fats, oils, and sweets should be used sparingly:

Just amazing. My diabetic brother preaches this to me all the time....he's buying what his doctor is selling. When I told him that I miss eating shredded wheat because it spiked my BG, he yelled at me and told me to eat it. He said it's "normal" for my BG to go up after eating starch. I said, "but not over 140" (which mine does so I just don't eat that stuff anymore). He yelled at me again. I know that if I eat the way the ADA recommends, I will become diabetic in a very short time.

The ADA is living in the dark ages.


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