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-   -   Type 2 Diabetes Magically turns into Type 1! (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/diabetes/812569-type-2-diabetes-magically-turns-into-type-1-a.html)

Seeking 09-19-2013 01:02 PM

Type 2 Diabetes Magically turns into Type 1!
 
Warning: rant ahead!

I just watched a video about people with diabetes who were eating to better control their blood glucose levels so that they could reduce or come off insulin. Well, this one fellow in the video said that after he changed his diet, his doctor changed the diagnosis from Type 2 to Type 1...

In my opinion, this doctor should be fired. T2 and T1 have different causes and different rules to control them. I bet this "doctor" didn't even run any blood tests to show that there were anti-insulin antibodies in his blood. If there are, then it's T1. If not, then it's T2. Am I a better doctor than this guy's doctor?

What the heck is the deal with doctors NOT BOTHERING to properly test for and diagnose a health condition that is EASY to diagnose???? T1 is one of the easiest; all you need to do is run that blood test that shows if the patient has insulin antibodies! What is wrong with the world???

/end rant

Ronnie51 09-19-2013 03:25 PM

As I get older and become more involved with my and my family's healthcare (thanks to the Internet), I'm also seeing more and more how doctors screw up. Anyway, I'm guessing that this man was diagnosed around or after middle age so the doctor may have assumed it is type 2, or as it used to be called "adult onset diabetes". I also have a friend who was diagnosed after age 50, but his doctor did the necessary tests and it turns out he has type 1. Anyway, this is another example of people needing to learn more about their diagnoses, taking charge of their health and remembering to ask questions.

Widget 09-19-2013 07:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronnie51 (Post 16611543)
I'm guessing that this man was diagnosed around or after middle age so the doctor may have assumed it is type 2, or as it used to be called "adult onset diabetes".

That's right. And since doctors are taught that type 2 is caused by being overweight, many of them assume if someone is fat, it's type 2.

For some type 1's there is a period of time called a honeymoon where they have been diagnosed with diabetes, and their pancreas still produces insulin for a while. The length of time differs and not all type 1's enjoy a honeymoon. But partly because of this, it isn't uncommon for type 1's to be misdiagnosed as type 2.

Seeking 09-19-2013 07:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronnie51 (Post 16611543)
As I get older and become more involved with my and my family's healthcare (thanks to the Internet), I'm also seeing more and more how doctors screw up. Anyway, I'm guessing that this man was diagnosed around or after middle age so the doctor may have assumed it is type 2, or as it used to be called "adult onset diabetes". I also have a friend who was diagnosed after age 50, but his doctor did the necessary tests and it turns out he has type 1. Anyway, this is another example of people needing to learn more about their diagnoses, taking charge of their health and remembering to ask questions.

Nope, this guy was a young man and he was slim, not fat. Doctors think they can diagnose you just by taking a look at you I suppose. Accurate diagnoses are extremely important; peoples' quality of life is on the line.

I am about to get thyroid testing, and if it shows that I have a thyroid problem, this will mean that for the past decade I've been taking antidepressant medication that I didn't need to take and that i was misdiagnosed because of doctors that are trained to hand out prescriptions like candy without verifying the accuracy of their diagnoses and allowing people's true conditions to degenerate. Irresponsible and dangerous.

skinni 09-19-2013 08:06 PM

Correct me if I'm wrong, because I really don't know... but doesn't late stage Type II turn into Type I? (It wouldn't surprise me if this happened after being told to eat whole grains all day.)

Widget 09-19-2013 08:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seeking (Post 16611828)
I am about to get thyroid testing, and if it shows that I have a thyroid problem, this will mean that for the past decade I've been taking antidepressant medication that I didn't need to take and that i was misdiagnosed because of doctors that are trained to hand out prescriptions like candy without verifying the accuracy of their diagnoses and allowing people's true conditions to degenerate. Irresponsible and dangerous.

Amen to that. Best of luck with the test. Here is hoping all turns out well for you.

Widget 09-19-2013 08:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skinni (Post 16611838)
Correct me if I'm wrong, because I really don't know... but doesn't late stage Type II turn into Type I?

Type 1 and 2 are totally different. There is such a thing as double diabetes where a person has elements of both types.

Seeking 09-19-2013 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skinni (Post 16611838)
Correct me if I'm wrong, because I really don't know... but doesn't late stage Type II turn into Type I? (It wouldn't surprise me if this happened after being told to eat whole grains all day.)

In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system is confused and mistakenly attacks the pancreas beta cells that produce insulin. Eventually all the beta cells die off due to this attack. In type 2 diabetes, the immune system is not attacking the beta cells.

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces less insulin over time as the disease degenerates. But this is not because of an autoimmune attack against the beta cells. I am not sure why it happens; perhaps someone else knows.

Widget 09-19-2013 08:38 PM

In type 2, extended periods of high blood glucose damages and can eventually kill some of the beta cells.

Seeking 09-20-2013 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Widget (Post 16611865)
In type 2, extended periods of high blood glucose damages and can eventually kill some of the beta cells.

Oh yeah that's right. I had read that before. So it's like a vicious cycle: diabetes causes high blood glucose levels which then damage more beta cells which then causes even more glucose to remain in the blood which then damages more beta cells. A low-carb diet would cause less glucose to be in the blood stream and would probably slow or stop the progression of T2 diabetes.

Moonchild 09-20-2013 12:08 PM

There is also type 1.5 :
aka Slow Onset Type 1 and LADA

Type 1.5 is one of several names now applied to those who are diagnosed with diabetes as adults, but who do not immediately require insulin for treatment, are often not overweight, and have little or no resistance to insulin. When special lab tests are done, they are found to have antibodies, especially GAD65 antibodies, that attack their beta cells. This sort of diabetes is sometimes called Slow Onset Type 1 or Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults or LADA.

About 15% to 20% of people diagnosed as "Type 2" actually have this type. They are often diagnosed as Type 2 because they are older and will initially respond to diabetes medications because they have adequate insulin production.

Ronnie51 09-21-2013 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Moonchild (Post 16612694)
There is also type 1.5 :
aka Slow Onset Type 1 and LADA

Type 1.5 is one of several names now applied to those who are diagnosed with diabetes as adults, but who do not immediately require insulin for treatment, are often not overweight, and have little or no resistance to insulin. When special lab tests are done, they are found to have antibodies, especially GAD65 antibodies, that attack their beta cells. This sort of diabetes is sometimes called Slow Onset Type 1 or Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults or LADA.

About 15% to 20% of people diagnosed as "Type 2" actually have this type. They are often diagnosed as Type 2 because they are older and will initially respond to diabetes medications because they have adequate insulin production.

Thank you for this very informative explanation!

Duke Leto Atreides 09-27-2013 06:06 PM

ok... wow... taking 1st steps here... I am a closet Diabetic with the Diagnosis of Type 1.5 myself and I'll tell ya, the doc's just don't understand us 1.5's.... 1st, I was a type 2 and then after a few years of not really getting this under control a new doctor (I moved to a new state) re-diagnosed me as something new to him.. a Type 1.5 and says it was from virus.... does this sound right? I am doing Low Carb for weight loss and to try to get this under control but not doing real well yet.... Have all of you found that you get treated differently if anyone knows your a diabetic?

Widget 09-27-2013 08:21 PM

There are two types of 1.5 diabetes... MODY which is rare, and LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults). If you actually are type 1.5, it is a pretty sure bet that you are type LADA.

Since you say that for your doc, type 1.5 is something new to him, I am wondering if he diagnosed you on the basis of a finger prick and an A1c test. I ask because there are certain tests that can be done to determine whether or not you are type 1.5 It is very important to have the correct diagnosis. I have never heard of 1.5 being caused by a virus. I believe it is genetic.

My advice is to go to the blood sugar 101 website, type LADA in the search box and do some reading.

The bs101 website (considered by many to be the diabetes bible) says if you are type 1.5 it is best to be treated by an endocrinologist.

soapluvr 09-28-2013 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seeking (Post 16611828)
Nope, this guy was a young man and he was slim, not fat. Doctors think they can diagnose you just by taking a look at you I suppose. Accurate diagnoses are extremely important; peoples' quality of life is on the line.

I am about to get thyroid testing, and if it shows that I have a thyroid problem, this will mean that for the past decade I've been taking antidepressant medication that I didn't need to take and that i was misdiagnosed because of doctors that are trained to hand out prescriptions like candy without verifying the accuracy of their diagnoses and allowing people's true conditions to degenerate. Irresponsible and dangerous.

If this were me I'd be royally pissed off. I really have a healthy fear of doctors.:annoyed:

Seeking 09-29-2013 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by soapluvr (Post 16622406)
If this were me I'd be royally pissed off. I really have a healthy fear of doctors.:annoyed:

Oh I know, and I do too. I do not trust doctors for a minute when it comes to my hormones and female oriented issues. I have come to think of doctors as disease management specialists. Once you already have a disease, especially one that is very easy to clearly diagnose, textbook symptoms, etc, then they can help you, but usually only by prescribing a medication or going through surgery.

Now, obviously you and I are not going to perform surgery on ourselves, so we need a doctor at that point. But when if you are a person who has textbook symptoms you can just go online and find out what you have and then go to a doctor 1 time and that is just to get the prescription you need.

Outside of surgery and advanced/complicated tests, I don't see how doctors are actually a help.


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