Low Carb Friends  
Netrition.com - Tools - Reviews - Faces - Recipes - Home


Go Back   Low Carb Friends > Eating and Exercise Plans > Weight Loss Plans > Atkins Nutritional Approach
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-28-2011, 11:50 PM   #1
Senior LCF Member
 
thealything's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 486
Gallery: thealything
Stats: 238/196/138 5'7"
WOE: Atkins (DANDR)
Start Date: restart March '12
I have gout now :(

Just wanted to update y'all on my progress:

I have been doing atkins on and off for quite some time, following DANDR with great success but always gaining the weight back after abandoning the plan for one reason or another. Most recently I had gotten off of it due to job stressors and then unemployment, and was eating the SAD for almost two years before getting back on the wagon in April 2010. I had lost 35 lbs by August... then in October started having a random unexplained knee pain. As gout runs in my family, and my dad was diagnosed with it after he started Atkins, I was scared and more or less stopped the diet but continued to have the knee pain throughout the winter... I kept trying to start again but would be in pain a lot,a nd would be too paranoid and then stopped

My bloodwork came back today. Hormones normal, blood sugar normal, thyroid normal, electrolytes normal, iron/rbc normal, everything awesome EXCEPT slightly elevated LDL cholesterol and elevated uric acid. I should mention that I was on low carb and was in ketosis when I had the tests done.

I spoke to my dr about it and he said I didn't have to necessarily give up Atkins. He stated that he knew Atkins was very popular but he had never seen gout resuting from it (and he is OLD!) so he thought he would put me on medication and I should just keep continuing what I was doing. He said he didn't think my cholesterol was high enough to warrant medication at this time; he did say that I should lower my fat intake and then come in to get bloodwork redone in about 6 months to see if there was any improvement in my cholesterol profile.

Well I am relieved to have a (mostly) clean bill of health and be able to continue on low carb again. I gained back most of the weight I lost so it will be nice to get back to it! That said, I wanted to share this as a way to warn others. Heart disease, diabetes and gout (as well as psoriasis, mental health issues etc) all run in my family and all seem to be affected in one way or another by diet. Gout isn't *caused* by Atkins necessarily but the higher levels of protein and meat most of us take in can exacerbate it.
thealything is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old 03-01-2011, 05:23 PM   #2
.
 
ravenrose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: California
Posts: 9,670
Gallery: ravenrose
Stats: lost 130 lb so far, and miles to go before I sleep
WOE: low carb controlled calorie
Start Date: June, 2009
it's now known that sugar is the primary contributor to gout. I had high uric acid levels, but sticking to 20 grams or carbs or less a day for over a year and a half seems to have cured, it, even with all the protein! I really don't think that has anything to do with gout, as your doctor said.
ravenrose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2011, 05:32 PM   #3
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
Beezer Louisiana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 3,769
Gallery: Beezer Louisiana
Stats: 192.2/160/160 (5'6")
WOE: Very low carb, no frankenfoods. NK
Start Date: June 21, 2010
Here is a link to some great citations that show carbohydrates are the cause of a rise in uric acid levels which then cause gout:

Diets for Gout That Restrict Carbs Seem to Help. Why?

Quote:
1. Unfortunately for us, science journalist Gary Taubes excised his chapter on gout from Good Calories Bad Calories to keep the book (relatively) trim. The good news is that online sources allow us to read some of his writing on the subject.

This excellent blog entry quotes Taubes discussing the work of Gerald Reaven, who describes how hyperinsulinemia could be the root cause for gout:

"These observations would suggest that anything that raised insulin levels would in turn raise uric acid levels and might cause gout, which would implicate any high carbohydrate diet with sufficient calories."[1]

Taubes also discusses the role of fructose and simple sugar in the etiology of gout. His comprehensive discussion (replete with citations) should convince most skeptics that the "gout-carbohydrate" argument has serious heft.

2. This article, "Ask the doctor about treating gout," debunks the idea that a high protein diet causes gout and instead offers:

"Excessive carbohydrate consumption, particularly of refined flour and sugar, foods that in previous times were solely the domain of the wealthy, can also raise the uric acid levels and precipitate gout. This fact also explains the frequent finding of obesity in those suffering from gout... people with historically high protein intake who also ate lots of fats and soup broths, with no refined carbohydrates, rarely if ever suffer from gout."[2]

3. For more, check out Life Without Bread Chapter 6 (99-100). Here's a juicy quote about diets for gout:

"For a long time, it has been known that infusion of sugar solutions, especially fructose and sorbitol, causes a quick elevation of uric acid... Carbohydrates stimulate uric acid production. This alone should be a reason to put people with elevated uric acid levels on a carbohydrate restricted diet."[3]

This is only the tip of the iceberg in terms of the evidence that can be mustered to support the proposal that obesity and gout arise from eating diets abnormally high in carbohydrates and that the best diets for gout must be low carb.
Beezer Louisiana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2011, 03:17 AM   #4
Senior LCF Member
 
mccb17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Washington, DC/Northern NY State
Posts: 865
Gallery: mccb17
Stats: 439/250(met!)/239/235 6'0"
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: 3 January 2011
I had trouble with gout the first time I tried Atkins. My doctor said I was probably eating too much red meat. He had me take steroids for the inflammation, but they didn't do much. But I modified my diet to include more greens and was sure to have either chicken or fish every day, and it seemed to do the trick. I've never had it since... knock on wood.

The pain lessened in about 5 days, went away in about a week and a half.

My gout was in the ball of my foot and in my big toe. I hear that's the most common location for it, though I read somewhere that the knee is also possible.

I guess my point is: I didn't have to give up Atkins; I just had to make my diet a little less rich.
__________________
Mike


~35g carbs, 1800-2000 kcal, 2 or 3 cups green vegetables, 6 oz cheese max per day.

Cardio or swimming, 3-4 times per week.
mccb17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 08:52 AM   #5
Junior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Phila area
Posts: 27
Gallery: achevres
Stats: 123/117/110
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: 1/12/11
Here is the missing chapter from "Good Calories, Bad Calories":
Gout: The Missing Chapter from Good Calories, Bad Calories
achevres is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2011, 02:56 AM   #6
Senior LCF Member
 
darkgardyner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: My heart lives in England, but the rest of me lives in Maine
Posts: 218
Gallery: darkgardyner
Stats: No more scale for me!~ Aiming for Strong & Healthy
WOE: Giving the Harcombe Diet a spin....
Start Date: Live & Learn!
Thanks!!!

Thank you so much for posting this! I too had gout when doing Atkins in the past. It's great to know that carbs are the evil here! In fact, I suspect the large amounts of diet soda I used to drink were triggering insulin production, causing my gout. I've since switched to seltzer.
darkgardyner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2012, 01:52 AM   #7
Junior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 2
Gallery: PaulB
Stats: 203/196/170
WOE: Metabolism Miracle
Start Date: July 3
"Science of Low Carb" take on this

I realize this a year late, but for those still searching for answers on this topic:
According to authors Volek and Phinney (2011), beginning a very lo-carb diet does indeed cause a spike in uric acid. That's because rising ketones interfere with the body's clearance of uric acid.

After a few weeks, they claim, the body adjusts and uric acid falls to normal (or at least to prior levels.)

Going OFF the VLCD and returning to a high-carb diet creates another ketone / uric acid interaction, and again uric acid spikes.

They argue that it is the CHANGE in carb ingestion (either way) that can cause a gout attack, rather than the regular living on lo-carbs.

How long until you are safe? Dunno -- 2 to 6 weeks? I am into my 5th week of VLCD and my left toe has been throbbing... But no actual attack yet.
PaulB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 04:24 AM   #8
Very Gabby LCF Member!!!
 
atcgirl42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,712
Gallery: atcgirl42
interesting stuff!
atcgirl42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2012, 08:14 AM   #9
Senior LCF Member
 
mccb17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Washington, DC/Northern NY State
Posts: 865
Gallery: mccb17
Stats: 439/250(met!)/239/235 6'0"
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: 3 January 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulB View Post
I realize this a year late, but for those still searching for answers on this topic:
According to authors Volek and Phinney (2011), beginning a very lo-carb diet does indeed cause a spike in uric acid. That's because rising ketones interfere with the body's clearance of uric acid.

After a few weeks, they claim, the body adjusts and uric acid falls to normal (or at least to prior levels.)

Going OFF the VLCD and returning to a high-carb diet creates another ketone / uric acid interaction, and again uric acid spikes.

They argue that it is the CHANGE in carb ingestion (either way) that can cause a gout attack, rather than the regular living on lo-carbs.

How long until you are safe? Dunno -- 2 to 6 weeks? I am into my 5th week of VLCD and my left toe has been throbbing... But no actual attack yet.
I'm not disputing the validity of the study, but that scenario doesn't fit very well with my experience. I'd been on the Atkins plan for several months when my gout hit, and it wasn't associated with any immediate dietary changes. Oh well... I guess there are always outliers?
mccb17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2012, 10:32 AM   #10
Junior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 2
Gallery: PaulB
Stats: 203/196/170
WOE: Metabolism Miracle
Start Date: July 3
Just wondering -- after several months on Atkins you were probably well past the induction phase, and thus had added a bit more carb. Do you know exactly how many grams of carb you were ingesting? Apparently ketonemia varies from person to person but Phinney and Volek (p. 166) define it as generally under 50 gms. It could be even less -- 30 or 20-- depending on the individual. It would be very easy to add just enough hidden carbs so you could be bobbing along right on the surface, thus cycling in & out, causing uric acid spikes -- yet still be eating very low carb by normal standards. P & V say nothing about "net carbs" so their definition of ketogenic could be even stricter than an approach that subtracts fiber grams to get "net.". Just a thought.... I'm no expert!
PaulB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 05:41 AM   #11
Senior LCF Member
 
mccb17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Washington, DC/Northern NY State
Posts: 865
Gallery: mccb17
Stats: 439/250(met!)/239/235 6'0"
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: 3 January 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulB View Post
Just wondering -- after several months on Atkins you were probably well past the induction phase, and thus had added a bit more carb. Do you know exactly how many grams of carb you were ingesting? Apparently ketonemia varies from person to person but Phinney and Volek (p. 166) define it as generally under 50 gms. It could be even less -- 30 or 20-- depending on the individual. It would be very easy to add just enough hidden carbs so you could be bobbing along right on the surface, thus cycling in & out, causing uric acid spikes -- yet still be eating very low carb by normal standards. P & V say nothing about "net carbs" so their definition of ketogenic could be even stricter than an approach that subtracts fiber grams to get "net.". Just a thought.... I'm no expert!
I was still taking in very few carbs. I stayed at about 30g of carbs/day for a long time. The dietary change that seemed to help was adding more fiber to my diet-- lettuce, cucumbers, bell peppers. I also ate more chicken, thinking that perhaps the beef I'd been eating was too fatty. It worked and hasn't been a problem since. And I've never put much faith in net carbs, per se, so I usually count the full carbohydrate value.
mccb17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2012, 05:28 PM   #12
Zombie Fairy Princess
 
Marlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: NY
Posts: 7,121
Gallery: Marlee
Stats: -53
WOE: Atkins
Last night my foot started hurting very badly. Just kind of like it hurts if you sprain your finger or something? It's like in the I guess ball of my foot and it hurts when I bend my toes. My big toe is ok though. I haven't seen a doc yet cause this just started but I've been googling all the possibilities. It sounds like gout is possible. *sigh*

I'm about 6 weeks into Atkins atm.

Wondering if I'm eating too much red meat and should stop eating it or raise carbs or what Does anyone have any good websites on this?
__________________

Marlee

"It's well we cannot hear the screams we make in other people's dreams." ~ Edward Gorey

Last edited by Marlee; 08-13-2012 at 05:30 PM..
Marlee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2012, 12:26 PM   #13
Junior LCF Member
 
Fleur-de-Lis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 23
Gallery: Fleur-de-Lis
Stats: 260/244/170
WOE: Atkins
Start Date: Restart Date: 11/10/2013
Gout

Hi Marlee,

I hope you feel better soon. I always look at WebMD and wait a few days before calling the doctor if it's not something potentially very health threatening.



I always say more water and rest can't hurt.

Best of luck, keep us up to date.
Fleur-de-Lis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2012, 11:37 PM   #14
Senior LCF Member
 
MerryKate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sequim, WA
Posts: 700
Gallery: MerryKate
Stats: 252/196.5/150
WOE: Nutritional ketosis
Start Date: April 2011
I was diagnosed with gout 15 years ago and I've taken allopurinol since then. I find it interesting to learn that gout might be caused by fructose intake. The first time I had an attack it took more than a month to go away, despite the fact that I pretty much cut protein from my diet in an attempt to fix it. Now I know why.

For those currently suffering, I can offer immediate help: Black cherry extract capsules (which you can get from Netrition). Take two cherry pills and the pain will be gone in 15 minutes. If you're having a serious attack it may take several doses to get long-term relief. I'm happy to say I haven't had a flare-up in years because I take them at the first sign of pain. You can get the same effect from drinking black cherry juice, but it's 22 net carbs for 4 oz, which is about the amount you need to get the pain relief. Cherry pills are also great for arthritis pain, and they won't cause the stomach problems like NSAIDs. Hope that helps.
MerryKate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2012, 11:51 PM   #15
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 155
Gallery: majomor
Quote:
Originally Posted by thealything View Post
Just wanted to update y'all on my progress:

I have been doing atkins on and off for quite some time, following DANDR with great success but always gaining the weight back after abandoning the plan for one reason or another. Most recently I had gotten off of it due to job stressors and then unemployment, and was eating the SAD for almost two years before getting back on the wagon in April 2010. I had lost 35 lbs by August... then in October started having a random unexplained knee pain. As gout runs in my family, and my dad was diagnosed with it after he started Atkins, I was scared and more or less stopped the diet but continued to have the knee pain throughout the winter... I kept trying to start again but would be in pain a lot,a nd would be too paranoid and then stopped

My bloodwork came back today. Hormones normal, blood sugar normal, thyroid normal, electrolytes normal, iron/rbc normal, everything awesome EXCEPT slightly elevated LDL cholesterol and elevated uric acid. I should mention that I was on low carb and was in ketosis when I had the tests done.

I spoke to my dr about it and he said I didn't have to necessarily give up Atkins. He stated that he knew Atkins was very popular but he had never seen gout resuting from it (and he is OLD!) so he thought he would put me on medication and I should just keep continuing what I was doing. He said he didn't think my cholesterol was high enough to warrant medication at this time; he did say that I should lower my fat intake and then come in to get bloodwork redone in about 6 months to see if there was any improvement in my cholesterol profile.

Well I am relieved to have a (mostly) clean bill of health and be able to continue on low carb again. I gained back most of the weight I lost so it will be nice to get back to it! That said, I wanted to share this as a way to warn others. Heart disease, diabetes and gout (as well as psoriasis, mental health issues etc) all run in my family and all seem to be affected in one way or another by diet. Gout isn't *caused* by Atkins necessarily but the higher levels of protein and meat most of us take in can exacerbate it.
Read Drs Eades blog on Gout about the myths of meat causing it, to find that the bad fats, like too much omega 6 and not enough omega 3 can be the culprit and other nutrients lacking in our diet!
majomor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2012, 11:58 PM   #16
Senior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 155
Gallery: majomor
Quote:
Originally Posted by MerryKate View Post
I was diagnosed with gout 15 years ago and I've taken allopurinol since then. I find it interesting to learn that gout might be caused by fructose intake. The first time I had an attack it took more than a month to go away, despite the fact that I pretty much cut protein from my diet in an attempt to fix it. Now I know why.

For those currently suffering, I can offer immediate help: Black cherry extract capsules (which you can get from Netrition). Take two cherry pills and the pain will be gone in 15 minutes. If you're having a serious attack it may take several doses to get long-term relief. I'm happy to say I haven't had a flare-up in years because I take them at the first sign of pain. You can get the same effect from drinking black cherry juice, but it's 22 net carbs for 4 oz, which is about the amount you need to get the pain relief. Cherry pills are also great for arthritis pain, and they won't cause the stomach problems like NSAIDs. Hope that helps.
I agree that the cherry is great for pain, now that the summer is over soon, I will have to get the cherry pills to supplement, although they say that only 4-6 cherrries per day is all you need and that was all I had all summer, so the carbs were relatively low for me....and yes I have read that the protein is a myth!
majomor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 09:24 AM   #17
Junior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1
Gallery: moejama
Gout Causes

You can't just believe every BS medical journal out there because it works conveniently with your opinion.

Carbs and sugar DO NOT cause gout in most sufferers, plain and simple. If I don't eat meat.. I don't get gout. If I eat high protein foods in large quantities, I get gout. If I eat a large amount of red meat I get gout even worse. Sometimes I can eat redmeat for a day, but I can guarantee if I eat it three days in a row I'll get goute and that's while eating less than 20 carbs a day.

Anyone who says they know how gout works, is lying. Gout is not the same for ever person. There are different major triggers for different people and I've never heard of anyone having sugar or carbs as a trigger. Perhaps in conjunction with meat.

The real truth about Gout is total protein intake. If your eating a very high protein diet your putter yourself at risk. It's not that you ate hambuger usually. It's that you eat a lot of hamburger. Creatine powder, in my case, can also cause me to have a high probability of a gout attack. Chicken breast and eggs can cause gout in some people. Just go look it up. The actual reasoning behind gout is still very immature in a scientific sense, but the pattern you will find is that high protein, seemingly of any kind, can cause gout.

The simple solution is to eat more fiber and lower protein and total calorie intake. Most people fall into two categories. They have the traditional 'red meat' gout where basically high purine foods are their tigger and even low amount can cause gout. Then you have the rest of us that can eat red meats and high purine foods, but too much over a time period will cause a gout flare up. In the end the amount of total food you eat is still a factor.

You may be on low carb and eating a large amount of eggs and helping push yourself over the limit. You're probably not ONLY eating eggs, but in the end every calorie contributes to gout to some degree.

This is why the ultimate cure for gout is to start controlling calorie intake, not just purine or carb intake.

In any case sugar and carbs are not the major evils. I have 10 times less gout outbreaks when I'm not eating low carb because I can eat a lot more pasta and starches. In my case I just have no willpower and I eat too much of the stuff.

Another thing about gout is your pattern of eating. You may find your can eat a hamburger everyday, but when you start adding chicken breast or turkey breast to your hamburger you may push yourself past your bodies ability to process uric acid.

ANY rapid changes in your diet can help cause gout in some people. Fasting can even trigger a gout flare up because it puts extra work on your kidneys. So the thing to understand is that when you tax your kidneys with something you are at higher risk of the kidneys not being about to process uric acid fast enough.

I personally have never seen a situation where sugar and carbs will cause gout. You have to be eating high protein foods along with those sugars. Most likely the purines are in fact what cause gout, but every other thing you eat also slows down your kidneys from processing.

Another MAJOR factor is lack of strenuous exercise. Like any healthy human being your really want to do something that gets you to the top range of your heart rate at least once a day and do that for a min of 5 minutes. That means 5 minutes of hard running a day, at least, more realistically 15 min at your top sustainable pace is what you want, but most people who have gout are not active and thus.. they have gout.

Now .. once you run and fast for a day or two you kidneys catch up and clear out your uric acid levels and now you have a buffer of kidney processing power against gout. However, once you full that out with some purine foods and a bunch of calories you kidneys have a backlog and the next day they have a backlog and the next day uric acid levels are still rising. You can always out purine your kidneys, that's what it means to have gout. Eliminating sugar and carbs will not prevent gout on a low carb diet unless you still manage purine rich foods and overall protein and calorie intake.

You have to learn that every calorie ultimately contributes to gout when you are on a low carb diet, because you are almost certainly eating high purine food with your low carb diet and every cheese or egg calorie you add is less uric avid removal time. Obviously drink lots of water helps and alcohol is probably the single worst thing for gout.

However, the odd thing about alcohol is that it can, at times, be quick cure for gout, but often followed by waking up to a much worse flare the next day and I don't mean getting so drunk you can't feel gout, because that just won't happen. Alcohol does something to negate the pain or correct the uric acid imbalance in some people, but you should NEVER use it like that as you'll potentially end up in a downward uric acid spiral.

The way to avoid gout is to keep those uric acid level steady, not quick diet changes. No PIGGING out on purine foods, just slow an steady and you can still have your purine foods because your body will probably be able to adjust, but when you send a turkey fueled purine spike at it, that's when you get a gout attack.
moejama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2014, 12:44 PM   #18
Junior LCF Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1
Gallery: donfull
How carbs and proties affect Gout

Causes[edit]
Many factors contribute to hyperuricemia, including: genetics, insulin resistance, hypertension, renal insufficiency, obesity, diet, use of diuretics, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.[2] Of these, alcohol consumption is the most important.[3]
Causes of hyperuricemia can be classified into three functional types:[4] increased production of uric acid, decreased excretion of uric acid, and mixed type. Causes of increased production include high levels of purine in the diet and increasedpurine metabolism. Causes of decreased excretion include kidney disease, certain drugs, and competition for excretion between uric acid and other molecules. Mixed causes include high levels of alcohol and/or fructose in the diet, and starvation.
Increased production[edit]
A purine-rich diet is a common but minor cause of hyperuricemia. Diet alone generally is not sufficient to cause hyperuricemia. Purine content of foods varies (see Gout). Foods high in the purines adenine and hypoxanthine may be more potent in exacerbating hyperuricemia.[5]
Hyperuricemia of this type is a common complication of solid organ transplant.[6] Apart from normal variation (with a genetic component), tumor lysis syndrome produces extreme levels of uric acid, mainly leading to renal failure. The Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is also associated with extremely high levels of uric acid.
Decreased excretion[edit]
The principal drugs that contribute to hyperuricemia by decreased excretion are the primary antiuricosurics. Other drugs and agents include diuretics, salicylates, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, nicotinic acid, ciclosporin, 2-ethylamino-1,3,4-thiadiazole, and cytotoxic agents.[7]
The gene SLC2A9 encodes a protein that helps to transport uric acid in the kidney. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms of this gene are known to have a significant correlation with blood uric acid.[8]
A ketogenic diet impairs the ability of the kidney to excrete uric acid, due to competition for transport between uric acid and ketones.[9]
Elevated blood lead is significantly correlated with both impaired kidney function and hyperuricemia (although the causal relationship among these correlations is not known). In a study of over 2500 people resident in Taiwan, a blood lead levelexceeding 7.5 microg/dL (a small elevation) had odds ratios of 1.92 (95% CI: 1.18-3.10) for renal dysfunction and 2.72 (95% CI: 1.64-4.52) for hyperuricemia.[10][11]
Mixed[edit]
Causes of hyperuricemia that are of mixed type have a dual action, both increasing production and decreasing excretion of uric acid.
High intake of alcohol (ethanol), a significant cause of hyperuricemia, has a dual action that is compounded by multiple mechanisms. Ethanol increases production of uric acid by increasing production of lactic acid, hence lactic acidosis. Ethanol also increases the plasma concentrations of hypoxanthine and xanthine via the acceleration of adenine nucleotide degradation, and is a possible weak inhibitor of xanthine dehydrogenase. As a byproduct of its fermentation process, beeradditionally contributes purines. Ethanol decreases excretion of uric acid by promoting dehydration and (rarely) clinical ketoacidosis.[3]
High dietary intake of fructose contributes significantly to hyperuricemia.[12][13][14] In a large study in the United States, consumption of four or more sugar-sweetened soft drinks per day gave an odds ratio of 1.82 for hyperuricemia.[15]Increased production of uric acid is the result of interference, by a product of fructose metabolism, in purine metabolism. This interference has a dual action, both increasing the conversion of ATP to inosine and hence uric acid and increasing the synthesis of purine.[16] Fructose also inhibits the excretion of uric acid, apparently by competing with uric acid for access to the transport protein SLC2A9.[17] The effect of fructose in reducing excretion of uric acid is increased in people with a hereditary (genetic) predisposition toward hyperuricemia and/or gout.[16]
Starvation causes the body to metabolize its own (purine-rich) tissues for energy. Thus, like a high purine diet, starvation increases the amount of purine converted to uric acid. A very low calorie diet without carbohydrate can induce extreme hyperuricemia; including some carbohydrate (and reducing the protein) reduces the level of hyperuricemia.[18] Starvation also impairs the ability of the kidney to excrete uric acid, due to competition for transport between uric acid and ketones.[19]
donfull is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:35 PM.


Copyright ©1999-2014 Friends Forums LLC. All rights reserved. - Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
LowCarbFriends® is a registered mark of Friends Forums, LLC.