Low Carb Friends

Low Carb Friends (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/)
-   Atkins Nutritional Approach (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/atkins-nutritional-approach/)
-   -   FINALLY! how to fix tasty shirataki noodles (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/atkins-nutritional-approach/671286-finally-how-fix-tasty-shirataki-noodles.html)

aVeryGoodGirl 04-19-2010 12:49 PM

FINALLY! how to fix tasty shirataki noodles
 
1 - 8 oz bag Tofu Shirataki noodles
2 1/2 gallons water
1 tsp minced garlic
1 tsp chicken base
1/2 tsp onion powder
2 tbsp butter or margarine
2 cups water

Open bag of noodles and drain into collander; pour 1/2 gallon water at a time over noodles to rinse until all 2 1/2 gallons of water are used. Let noodles sit in collander 5 minutes to continue draining. Put remaining water, chicken base, and minced garlic into 3 quart sauce pan and whisk until base is mixed. Add noodles, butter and onion powder and continue boiling for at least 10 minutes. Pour back into collander and drain well. Place noodles back into dry sauce pan for a few minutes to dry out.

I then add 1 can diced tomatoes, a few shakes of dried basil (to taste), a few shakes of oregano (to taste), and a shake of paprika. Cook for about 5 minutes then serve.

Yeah, it's a lot of work but so worth it... about 200 calories for the entire pot.

WClock 04-19-2010 06:39 PM

Mmmm
 
I'm going to try that. I've found that if I rinse the tofu shirataki really well and squeeze a little lemon juice on it that there is no odor left in the noodles. I let is set for a minute or two and rinse. Another good way to use shirataki is to pan fry it in a little oil to make chow mein. I cook whatever meat I want to use, add a little more oil if needed and then spread the noodles out (I usually cut them up with scizzors) and just stir them occasionally at high heat Eventually, they start to crackle and pop--then you need to stir them more often and turn the heat down a bit. Just keep cooking until they start to jump around and dry out a bit. Add a little soy sauce. Scrape them over to the side, add whatever veggies you want, mix it all up, add more soy sauce to taste. Very good.

jennn1971 04-24-2010 06:12 AM

I love tofu shirataki. I was afraid to try it because of the reviews but after following the directions I love it. Used alfredo, too. I must not be able to taste anything weird about them.

brimmy 05-05-2010 01:09 AM

One of my easiest dishes that also tastes pretty good is this:

1 chicken breast either defrosted and cubed, or pre-cooked and cubed all ahead of time. I drain the noodles in a colander under warm water for about 2 minutes. Then I squash as much liquid out of them as I can with my hands. I then take them out and put the noodles between some paper towels and smash as much liquid out that way as I can.

I then put the noodles in a microwaveable bowl, and set it on high for 1 minute. Some of the water will have steamed off, and some will be in the bottom of the bowl. Try to drain the water from the bottom of the bowl before it re absorbs back into the noodles.

If you need to cook the chicken take a non stick skillet and turn it to medium-high with a little bit of oil in it and add the chicken. Cook the chicken until it starts to brown most of the way around, but not cooked completely through. At this point add 1 tbsp or so of kikoman brand teriyaki sauce (only 2 carbs), and 1 tbsp of dry sack sherry. Add in the noodles, and stir around so that your noodles absorb the sherry and teriyaki sauce.

Continue to stir everything together while the noodles continue to give up liquid and help finish cooking the chicken, while adding the nice teriyaki flavor to the whole dish. Add pepper, and just a small amount of salt to taste. I also add garlic powder (I use fresh sometimes, but this is my quick recipe) and cayenne to give it some kick.

I prefer my noodles get to the point where they let off just the slightest hint of an almost burning smell, but you can really take them off the burner once the moisture is gone, or you can break the chicken apart easily and it's no longer pink at all in the middle. Serve and enjoy! I ate this for lunch every day for 3 weeks once, never got sick of it.

If you use pre-cooked chicken in this recipe, you can just add the chicken and noodles at the same point and omit the oil entirely, although the oil can give a little more richness to the noodles if you prefer.

Sans the oil the noodles, sherry, and teriyaki sauce have approximately 71 calories, 8 carbs, and 4 grams of fiber. Then add in whatever brand and size of chicken breast you want to complete the nutritional info.

I have also cooked this ahead of time before in a bigger batch, and stored it in Tupperware and reheated it in the microwave at work the next day. The nice thing about that is that the noodles do such a great job at holding moisture, the microwave the next day doesn't really dry it out too much.

casey78 05-07-2010 08:34 PM

Do you guys find that the shirataki have a bit of a crunchy texture? I certainly don't mind the taste but the texture throws me off, I find it almost like bean sprouts. Does anyone else experience this or am I not cooking them enough?

metqa 05-07-2010 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by casey78 (Post 13456761)
Do you guys find that the shirataki have a bit of a crunchy texture? I certainly don't mind the taste but the texture throws me off, I find it almost like bean sprouts. Does anyone else experience this or am I not cooking them enough?

Unfortunately, that IS their texture. If you only cook them for a short time like most if these recipes suggest, it will stay that texture, unless you buy the ones with tofu bean curd added.

If, however, you slow simmer them in a broth for a long time before eating them, then the noodles will soften up a lot AND absorb a lot of the flavors of the broth/stew in which it was cooked.

Minnas 05-20-2010 04:51 PM

There is an alternative to get rid of the rubber band texture and make them actually edible which is just to rinse then pan fry them for a while so that they release some of their liquid. It takes 20-30 minutes. I drain them once after about 10 minutes as a lot of liquid is released and this makes things go a bit faster. You need to pay a bit of attention to them and move them around a little every 5 minutes or so. You will see them start to shrivel just slightly. Then use them with whatever sauce you like. They are best left to sit overnight or for a few hours so they can have time to absorb some of the sauce. I particularly love them in pad thai or with a peanut sauce. Delish! Before learning how to prepare them I used to hate these things. Now I buy them by the case.:cool:

debkeversole 05-22-2010 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aVeryGoodGirl (Post 13388620)
1 - 8 oz bag Tofu Shirataki noodles
2 1/2 gallons water
1 tsp minced garlic
1 tsp chicken base
1/2 tsp onion powder
2 tbsp butter or margarine
2 cups water

Open bag of noodles and drain into collander; pour 1/2 gallon water at a time over noodles to rinse until all 2 1/2 gallons of water are used. Let noodles sit in collander 5 minutes to continue draining. Put remaining water, chicken base, and minced garlic into 3 quart sauce pan and whisk until base is mixed. Add noodles, butter and onion powder and continue boiling for at least 10 minutes. Pour back into collander and drain well. Place noodles back into dry sauce pan for a few minutes to dry out.

I then add 1 can diced tomatoes, a few shakes of dried basil (to taste), a few shakes of oregano (to taste), and a shake of paprika. Cook for about 5 minutes then serve.

Yeah, it's a lot of work but so worth it... about 200 calories for the entire pot.


i did a variation on this a few days ago just didn't cook them i marinades them overnight in the sauce (after the regular rinse the life out of them deal)and then heated up some chicken broth and turned the heat off added my noodles covered and let sit for a while DS14 saiid they tasted better than Ramen!

laranda 05-26-2010 05:50 AM

Has anyone ever successfully made these in an italian style dish, like spaghetti? My asian style dishes always turn out fine...

smallerizing 05-27-2010 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laranda (Post 13520277)
Has anyone ever successfully made these in an italian style dish, like spaghetti? My asian style dishes always turn out fine...

:sick: Yes :sick:

I will try this "rinse the life out of them" deal. Why would I have to boil them in the chicken water, though? The tomato and basil sounds yummy. I agree, lifeless, tastless rubber bands -- not good.

Frying them sounds like it might help. Why do they need so much rinsing???

Monkee 05-27-2010 12:55 PM

I'll have to give these another try!
I am going to try the chicken broth suggestion and keep my fingers crossed.

metqa 05-27-2010 09:10 PM

There are not, and never will be, like Italian pasta. They are gelatinous noodles and were not made with Italy's style of eating in mind. They are flavorless, chewy gummy strands of gelatinous fiber that expand in your stomach to make you feel full.

Because they absorb water, soaking or boiling them in a seasoned broth will cause the flavor of the broth and the extra liquid to be absorbed. When they absorb more liquid they are less chewy cause by weight there is less fiber and more water, but they are still gelatinous.

just think of it like this: you wouldn't try to substitute jello for wheat flour would you? Well, trying to imagine that these would make an "Italian Pasta Dish' would be like substituting Jello for pasta dough.

They were created in Asian and taste and prepare best in asian style dishes where they are simmered in strong broths or stirfried in strong sauces with veggies and meats and such. I've simmered them in a tomato sauce, and in Rotel, and made a soup with that and shredded chicken, but i wasn't pretending that it was spaghetti in pasta sauce. To me they were gelatinous noodles in my chicken and tomato stew, for extra bulk and chewiness. It's too slippery for alfredo, tomato sauce won't stick to it. It's just a slippery chewy noodle.

Spaghetti squash is a closer non wheat match for italian noodles than shiritaki.

I really can't understand why people keep trying to make it into something it is not. one wouldn't cook up a pot of rice noodles and slap tomato sauce on them. Shiritaki is the same consistency and more chewy than rice noodles. Try using them in dishes where you might use Ramen or Rice noodles and you'll probably have fewer taste and texture mismatches.

charlielou 05-28-2010 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by metqa (Post 13527039)
I really can't understand why people keep trying to make it into something it is not. one wouldn't cook up a pot of rice noodles and slap tomato sauce on them. Shiritaki is the same consistency and more chewy than rice noodles. Try using them in dishes where you might use Ramen or Rice noodles and you'll probably have fewer taste and texture mismatches.


Actually, being allergic to wheat, in my carby days I did eat pasta sauce on rice noodles. While shirataki are great in Asian dishes, I think it is individual preference with regards to the pasta sauce and I find them acceptable that way as well.. No, they will never be Italian pasta, but then neither will spaghetti squash or zucchini.

Minnas 05-28-2010 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlielou (Post 13528919)
Actually, being allergic to wheat, in my carby days I did eat pasta sauce on rice noodles. While shirataki are great in Asian dishes, I think it is individual preference with regards to the pasta sauce and I find them acceptable that way as well.. No, they will never be Italian pasta, but then neither will spaghetti squash or zucchini.

I do think it's important that people NOT expect pasta cause these are most definitely not pasta. I agree though that everything is relative and these are great fro someone who isn't able or willing to eat pasta again. I normally use them in an Asian style but I will sometimes use them in an Italian style sauce and can make them work. I really like them with clam sauce.

I find that drying them out actually makes the texture much more acceptable. I think some others have found this to be the case as well so it may be something worth trying for those who just can't seem to find any love for these noodles. I seriously hated these things until I started drying them out and now I just love them. O.k. love is a strong word for these but I do like them a lot. (I also find these are almost always better the next day after sitting in whatever sauce they are in. Less squeaky on my teeth!)

metqa 05-28-2010 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlielou (Post 13528919)
Actually, being allergic to wheat, in my carby days I did eat pasta sauce on rice noodles. While shirataki are great in Asian dishes, I think it is individual preference with regards to the pasta sauce and I find them acceptable that way as well.. No, they will never be Italian pasta, but then neither will spaghetti squash or zucchini.

I think Minnas said it how I meant it, that while shiritaki can be acceptable with many different types of sauces, expecting it to be "pasta" and then being upset that it isn't, is my point.

I've made all types of dishes with all types of sauces but I never had the expectation that they would come out tasting like Italian Pasta.

In fact I found spaghetti squash to be surprisingly more like pasta than I expected. I also found I preferred it with light dusting of salt pepper and garlic rather than the traditional sauces, so I learned something there also.

(I learned that spaghetti and tomato sauce is overated ::laugh:) I'd more often rather have a hearty stew or stir fry and pasta as a compliment not the base.

charlielou 05-29-2010 12:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by metqa (Post 13530436)

(I learned that spaghetti and tomato sauce is overated ::laugh:) I'd more often rather have a hearty stew or stir fry and pasta as a compliment not the base.

I make spaghetti and meat sauce for the carby girl and most often just eat the sauce doused in mozzarella and parmesan myself.

atcgirl42 05-29-2010 05:46 PM

Definitely not like spaghetti, but I like the noodles! Lots of good tips here. :)

oceandiva 05-30-2010 09:56 PM

after several years without flour, I tried the noodles and really enjoyed them. I rinsed them for a couple of minutes, boiled them for a minute, and set them aside to dry out. In the meantime, I made cream chicken with mushrooms and onions. The creamed chicken over the noodles tasted good to me. It's been a long time since I had pasta and don't really remember the taste nor do I want to remember.

TaDa! 06-06-2010 06:55 AM

I just cut open the bag and rinse in the bag - don't rinse too terribly thoroughly! Then throw it in a hot non-stick pan (no fat added)

I find they are killer delicious with just a tablespoon of butter and 2 tablespoons of parmesan cheese .....

Also:

Mock Ramen Noodle Soup
1-2 cube bouillon (I use 1 Knorr Vegetable Bouillon)
1 pkge rinsed and pan dried shiratake noodles
2 T sour cream
2 c boiling water
(throw in some tofu cubes if you like them)

Fabulous!!

:D Pauline

metqa 06-06-2010 06:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TaDa! (Post 13559099)
I just cut open the bag and rinse in the bag - don't rinse too terribly thoroughly! Then throw it in a hot non-stick pan (no fat added)

I find they are killer delicious with just a tablespoon of butter and 2 tablespoons of parmesan cheese .....

Also:

Mock Ramen Noodle Soup
1-2 cube bouillon (I use 1 Knorr Vegetable Bouillon)
1 pkge rinsed and pan dried shiratake noodles
2 T sour cream
2 c boiling water
(throw in some tofu cubes if you like them)

Fabulous!!

:D Pauline

That never occurred to me!;) I feel like I gotta go get some more noodles now! I love sour cream in my ramen!

smallerizing 06-07-2010 02:28 PM

Do you have problems drying them in the pan with no oil?

TaDa! 06-07-2010 02:35 PM

Christine - I don't have any problem - as they are leaking water as they dry and I am doing it in a non-stick pan. I also only do it for a couple of minutes -- not as long as some have mentioned. I have liked them in my recipes, so that works for me!!

hth!

CindyCRNA 07-16-2010 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TaDa! (Post 13564525)
Christine - I don't have any problem - as they are leaking water as they dry and I am doing it in a non-stick pan. I also only do it for a couple of minutes -- not as long as some have mentioned. I have liked them in my recipes, so that works for me!!

hth!

Is the thought behind pan drying before throwing them in boiling chicken broth is that they will absorb more broth flavor if they are partially dried? I just got an order in of the orzo as I had texture issues with the noodles. I would like to use it as a rice sub but they are too tasteless. I thinking of pan frying to dry them, boiling a bit in chicken broth, then pan frying again to dry them a bit to flavor them.

metqa 07-16-2010 04:46 PM

Wow, too much trouble. I'd just mince up a cauliflower and be done with it in 5 min.

LCJ 08-03-2010 03:21 PM

I really want to get some and try and make a chicken satay type dish..peanut butter and such like.

WldOrchidNV 09-23-2010 12:58 PM

Miracle Noodles:
 
I agree the taste is not a problem. You can add whatever you want to fix that. My problem is the texture. It starts out sort of feeling like rubber in your mouth. No problem chewing, but when you go to swallow it is like swallowing a big logie (gob of spit). What in the world can be done to fix the texture so it doesn't make me want to hurl every time I swallow? It kicks my gag reflex in every time.

CindyCRNA 09-23-2010 03:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WClock (Post 13389865)
I cook whatever meat I want to use, add a little more oil if needed and then spread the noodles out (I usually cut them up with scizzors) and just stir them occasionally at high heat Eventually, they start to crackle and pop--then you need to stir them more often and turn the heat down a bit. Just keep cooking until they start to jump around and dry out a bit. Add a little soy sauce. Scrape them over to the side, add whatever veggies you want, mix it all up, add more soy sauce to taste. Very good.

I finally did this and it was the best they ever were! Part of their problem is they leak water on your plate. This takes care of that and the noodles are MUCH better!!

CindyCRNA 09-23-2010 03:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WldOrchidNV (Post 13923722)
I agree the taste is not a problem. You can add whatever you want to fix that. My problem is the texture. It starts out sort of feeling like rubber in your mouth. No problem chewing, but when you go to swallow it is like swallowing a big logie (gob of spit). What in the world can be done to fix the texture so it doesn't make me want to hurl every time I swallow? It kicks my gag reflex in every time.

Try the suggestion in my above quote.

Gr82bthin 09-28-2010 08:28 AM

I love Dreamfields pasta. I've tried these noodles and just can't get past the texture either. I will try them in a soup. Thanks for the hints here.

lainielou 10-03-2010 09:24 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This is the best way I've found to use the noodles. . .I used to eat at a Vietnamese pho house once a week before lc'ing. . .tried ordering the soup with no noodles but it wasn't the same. . .so I started making this faux pho. . .it's really delicious and the noodles work perfectly. I try to ignore the "end result" with these noodles 'cause for this soup it's worth it. :)


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:56 AM.