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Old 12-20-2012, 07:42 PM   #1
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Starting Induction with a fast

I just started induction again on 12-18 with a 21 hour fast (was initially going to be a 16 hour fast, but wasn't hungry yet.. by 21 hours I was ravenous)

I'm considering throwing in a 24 hour fast once a week. Anyone doing induction with occassional fasting?

Maybe I should just stick to 16 hour fasts once or twice a week?

This time living low carb I'm also planning to not eat when I'm not feeling hungry (which is quite often actually) as well as watch closely when I get full, instead of obsessively using food as a drug.. like a always have, lol.

I started at 225.2 after a several day insane carb binge.

A thought just occured to me.. maybe I should wait until I'm very keto adapted before I start doing the 24 hour fasts, because then I'll be more of a fat burner and won't be catabolizing my muscle for glucose (although I think my glycogen stores should be more than adequate for a while lol.) Any metabolism geeks around here lol.. does the body use glycogen exclusively before it starts catabolizing muscle to meet our glucose needs? And am I wrong in assuming that our demand for glucose decreases as we became progressively more fat adapted?

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Old 12-21-2012, 07:37 AM   #2
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Trillex can probably give you all the technical metabolism details you like, if you can find her around here!

Yes... the rules of induction: Eat when you're hungry... and ONLY when you're hungry!

I'd say stick with that, and you won't go wrong. I know that increased fat-levels decreases muscle catabolism, but that's about the extent of my knowledge on the subject. (Again, we need to ping Trillex, and get her expert input.)
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Old 12-21-2012, 10:45 AM   #3
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Obviously you can do whatever you want. The key to this diet is figuring out how your body reacts to the food you eat. Where I have seen people on this diet fail, is if they try to stray too far from the formula in Dr. Atkins book. I would recommend that you just get past the first two weeks of induction and just worry about sticking to the food on the list and don't go over the carb level of 20 grams. From then make small adjustments and see how they work for you. Then try the fast and see if it makes you loose quicker. Good luck.

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Old 12-22-2012, 09:09 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoonosewen View Post
A thought just occured to me.. maybe I should wait until I'm very keto adapted before I start doing the 24 hour fasts, because then I'll be more of a fat burner and won't be catabolizing my muscle for glucose (although I think my glycogen stores should be more than adequate for a while lol.) Any metabolism geeks around here lol.. does the body use glycogen exclusively before it starts catabolizing muscle to meet our glucose needs? And am I wrong in assuming that our demand for glucose decreases as we became progressively more fat adapted?
Glycogen depletion is a bit tricky. Liver glycogen is quickly depleted because those glycogen stores are taken out of the liver during any period when the body is deprived of carbohydrates -- to feed the brain and body, and to keep the blood glucose level steady. But the bulk of the body's glycogen is stored in the muscles, and that store of glycogen is (basically) reserved to feed the muscles. Bodybuilders who do ketogenic diets do full-body circuit workouts at the start of a ketogenic cycle -- there's actually a formula for this workout to deplete muscle glycogen stores, based on lean body mass and some other factors which determine the length and intensity of the glycogen-depletion workout -- because the only way to exhaust those muscle glycogen stores is by forcing the muscle tissues to feed on their stored glycogen. Even then, muscle glycogen stores are never *entirely* depleted because working the muscles produces pyruvate and lactate, which generate a small amount of additional muscle glycogen.

The issue of muscle catabolism is also a bit tricky. Scott Connelley is a bodybuilder and surgeon who worked on developing intravenous nutrition for long-term coma patients. A while ago, I read an article by Connelley about the research and work that went into finding a solution for the muscle wasting that coma patients experience. First, researchers thought that the main issue was calories -- give the body enough calories and it will operate, maintain, and build the necessary tissue, they thought -- so the first theory was to feed the body intravenous glucose because glucose is an efficient and easily utilized source. Unfortunately, that didn't work well because the body still catabolized the muscles stores, even while it was being fed excess calories and actually getting fatter. The next theory was to feed the body liquid protein -- the body needs amino acids to maintain and build muscle protein, so the theory was that feeding the body adequate calories as protein would prevent muscle catabolism. That didn't quite correct the problem, either. Even when being fed excess calories and more than a sufficient quantity of protein, the body still catabolized some of its muscle tissue. They found that the best solution was to feed the body a combination of glucose and protein -- the glucose was necessary to create an anabolic (muscle-building) hormonal environment, and the protein provided the amino acids that the muscles need for maintenance and repair. I've just hugely over-simplified the process and the nutritional formula, but that's the basic idea.

A ketogenic diet activates the body's protein-sparing defenses to protect against muscle catabolism -- among other factors, processing a greater amount of ketones causes the kidneys to excrete less nitrogen, which helps preserve muscle tissue because nitrogen is a necessary component of muscle breakdown. These protein-sparing advantages are why most bodybuilding "cutting" diets are ketogenic -- bodybuilders don't want to lose muscle mass while they cut bodyfat. But the situation is complicated, because the ketogenic state is hormonally catabolic -- "catabolism" refers to the breakdown of body tissues, whether those tissues are bodyfat or muscle protein, and the same hormones that create a fat-cutting environment also present a threat to muscle tissue -- so a *muscle-sparing* diet isn't the same as a *muscle-building* diet. This is why most bodybuilding "cutting" diets are "cyclically" ketogenic -- mostly ketogenic, but with periodic glycogen re-feeds. These diets intersperse short periods of feeding the body carbohydrates -- often as a liquid solution that contains 1 part glucose plus 4 parts water -- to create a hormonally anabolic period to grow muscle mass during a fat-cutting ketogenic cycle. Then, as I mentioned earlier, they will do a full-body circuit workout to deplete the glycogen they've stored. The glycogen re-feed creates a hormonally anabolic environment, and the workout takes advantage of this anabolic period to build muscle.

Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek cite a study in The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, in which obese, keto-adapted men added a significant amount of muscle while losing an even greater amount of bodyfat when were put on a progressive-load weight training program while being fed less than 50g carbohydrates per day. The greatest fat loss in the group during the 12 weeks of the study was from a participant who lost 30 scale pounds while gaining 9 pounds of lean body mass -- 9 pounds of muscle mass is A LOT, even for an experienced bodybuilder. So there is some evidence that muscle can be built as well as maintained while keto-adapted.

Based on extensive studies of how the body changes during periods of complete starvation, researchers know that the process of keto-adaptation typically takes between 2-4 weeks. Different bodies take different amounts of time to fully adapt to the process of burning fatty acids instead of glucose because, among other reasons, people have different levels of insulin-resistance and even the amount of insulin-resistance in different muscle cells in the same body can vary. Insulin is the body's hormonal instrument for feeding glucose to the muscle cells so, when the body becomes metabolically damaged in a way that changes the level of insulin-resistance, that damage can complicate the process of re-adapting the cells to process fatty acids as their primary fuel.

In the initial stages of a ketogenic diet -- before the body has become keto-adapted and the muscle cells are able to directly use fatty acids as fuel -- most of the body's cells will continue to require glucose as their primary fuel. So the body will convert the food it's being fed into glucose -- 10% of the dietary fat intake will be converted to glucose (that 10% comes from the glycerol backbone of fatty acids) and 58% of dietary protein will be converted to glucose. If the body's energy needs exceed the amount of glucose that can be produced from dietary carbohydrates, fat, and protein, then the body will preferentially break down muscle stores to produce the necessary amount of glucose. The brain and muscle cells can and will also burn ketones during this period, which means that fat calories can make up for a portion of body's caloric needs. So, simply eating enough calories as fat and protein during this adaptation period should be sufficient to prevent any significant level of muscle catabolism. And the process of keto-adaptation is ongoing, with a rising percentage of body cells re-adjusting their primary fuel preference from glucose to fatty acids each day of the adaptation period -- the brain converts more quickly than the muscle cells because the brain's adaptation to burning ketones is the determinant factor in this conversion, the muscle tissue will burn a progressively lower amount of ketones as the adaptation process continues because the muscles will ultimately be fueled directly by fatty acids whereas the brain will never be fueled directly by fatty acids but will instead be fueled by a combination of approximately 25% glucose and 75% ketones.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:32 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trillex View Post
Glycogen depletion is a bit tricky. Liver glycogen is quickly depleted because those glycogen stores are taken out of the liver during any period when the body is deprived of carbohydrates -- to feed the brain and body, and to keep the blood glucose level steady. But the bulk of the body's glycogen is stored in the muscles, and that store of glycogen is (basically) reserved to feed the muscles. Bodybuilders who do ketogenic diets do full-body circuit workouts at the start of a ketogenic cycle -- there's actually a formula for this workout to deplete muscle glycogen stores, based on lean body mass and some other factors which determine the length and intensity of the glycogen-depletion workout -- because the only way to exhaust those muscle glycogen stores is by forcing the muscle tissues to feed on their stored glycogen. Even then, muscle glycogen stores are never *entirely* depleted because working the muscles produces pyruvate and lactate, which generate a small amount of additional muscle glycogen.

The issue of muscle catabolism is also a bit tricky. Scott Connelley is a bodybuilder and surgeon who worked on developing intravenous nutrition for long-term coma patients. A while ago, I read an article by Connelley about the research and work that went into finding a solution for the muscle wasting that coma patients experience. First, researchers thought that the main issue was calories -- give the body enough calories and it will operate, maintain, and build the necessary tissue, they thought -- so the first theory was to feed the body intravenous glucose because glucose is an efficient and easily utilized source. Unfortunately, that didn't work well because the body still catabolized the muscles stores, even while it was being fed excess calories and actually getting fatter. The next theory was to feed the body liquid protein -- the body needs amino acids to maintain and build muscle protein, so the theory was that feeding the body adequate calories as protein would prevent muscle catabolism. That didn't quite correct the problem, either. Even when being fed excess calories and more than a sufficient quantity of protein, the body still catabolized some of its muscle tissue. They found that the best solution was to feed the body a combination of glucose and protein -- the glucose was necessary to create an anabolic (muscle-building) hormonal environment, and the protein provided the amino acids that the muscles need for maintenance and repair. I've just hugely over-simplified the process and the nutritional formula, but that's the basic idea.

A ketogenic diet activates the body's protein-sparing defenses to protect against muscle catabolism -- among other factors, processing a greater amount of ketones causes the kidneys to excrete less nitrogen, which helps preserve muscle tissue because nitrogen is a necessary component of muscle breakdown. These protein-sparing advantages are why most bodybuilding "cutting" diets are ketogenic -- bodybuilders don't want to lose muscle mass while they cut bodyfat. But the situation is complicated, because the ketogenic state is hormonally catabolic -- "catabolism" refers to the breakdown of body tissues, whether those tissues are bodyfat or muscle protein, and the same hormones that create a fat-cutting environment also present a threat to muscle tissue -- so a *muscle-sparing* diet isn't the same as a *muscle-building* diet. This is why most bodybuilding "cutting" diets are "cyclically" ketogenic -- mostly ketogenic, but with periodic glycogen re-feeds. These diets intersperse short periods of feeding the body carbohydrates -- often as a liquid solution that contains 1 part glucose plus 4 parts water -- to create a hormonally anabolic period to grow muscle mass during a fat-cutting ketogenic cycle. Then, as I mentioned earlier, they will do a full-body circuit workout to deplete the glycogen they've stored. The glycogen re-feed creates a hormonally anabolic environment, and the workout takes advantage of this anabolic period to build muscle.

Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek cite a study in The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, in which obese, keto-adapted men added a significant amount of muscle while losing an even greater amount of bodyfat when were put on a progressive-load weight training program while being fed less than 50g carbohydrates per day. The greatest fat loss in the group during the 12 weeks of the study was from a participant who lost 30 scale pounds while gaining 9 pounds of lean body mass -- 9 pounds of muscle mass is A LOT, even for an experienced bodybuilder. So there is some evidence that muscle can be built as well as maintained while keto-adapted.

Based on extensive studies of how the body changes during periods of complete starvation, researchers know that the process of keto-adaptation typically takes between 2-4 weeks. Different bodies take different amounts of time to fully adapt to the process of burning fatty acids instead of glucose because, among other reasons, people have different levels of insulin-resistance and even the amount of insulin-resistance in different muscle cells in the same body can vary. Insulin is the body's hormonal instrument for feeding glucose to the muscle cells so, when the body becomes metabolically damaged in a way that changes the level of insulin-resistance, that damage can complicate the process of re-adapting the cells to process fatty acids as their primary fuel.

In the initial stages of a ketogenic diet -- before the body has become keto-adapted and the muscle cells are able to directly use fatty acids as fuel -- most of the body's cells will continue to require glucose as their primary fuel. So the body will convert the food it's being fed into glucose -- 10% of the dietary fat intake will be converted to glucose (that 10% comes from the glycerol backbone of fatty acids) and 58% of dietary protein will be converted to glucose. If the body's energy needs exceed the amount of glucose that can be produced from dietary carbohydrates, fat, and protein, then the body will preferentially break down muscle stores to produce the necessary amount of glucose. The brain and muscle cells can and will also burn ketones during this period, which means that fat calories can make up for a portion of body's caloric needs. So, simply eating enough calories as fat and protein during this adaptation period should be sufficient to prevent any significant level of muscle catabolism. And the process of keto-adaptation is ongoing, with a rising percentage of body cells re-adjusting their primary fuel preference from glucose to fatty acids each day of the adaptation period -- the brain converts more quickly than the muscle cells because the brain's adaptation to burning ketones is the determinant factor in this conversion, the muscle tissue will burn a progressively lower amount of ketones as the adaptation process continues because the muscles will ultimately be fueled directly by fatty acids whereas the brain will never be fueled directly by fatty acids but will instead be fueled by a combination of approximately 25% glucose and 75% ketones.
Thank you for the extensive and detailed information. I appreciate the time you put into responding!

I'm on day 6 and am a bit in the dumps. I've been having trouble sleeping consistently and for more than 4 or 5 hours the last few days, so the tiredness may have something to do with being sleep deprived.

A couple days ago I took some L-Tryptophan 500 MG and Magnesium Glycinate 400 MG and slept for no more than a couple hours. My body seems to respond to some things in the opposite way of what would be expected.

It is especially tough right now to be inducting because it's Christmas time and then New Years, so this is taking some extra will power. Having four consecutive days off from work is not helping either.. too much time on my hands.

All in all I am proud of myself. I am on day 6 strictly keeping low carb/high fat, no alcohol and no cigarettes.

Merry Christmas/Happy Holidays to everyone!
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Old 12-24-2012, 10:43 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Hoonosewen View Post
Thank you for the extensive and detailed information. I appreciate the time you put into responding!

I'm on day 6 and am a bit in the dumps. I've been having trouble sleeping consistently and for more than 4 or 5 hours the last few days, so the tiredness may have something to do with being sleep deprived.

A couple days ago I took some L-Tryptophan 500 MG and Magnesium Glycinate 400 MG and slept for no more than a couple hours. My body seems to respond to some things in the opposite way of what would be expected.

It is especially tough right now to be inducting because it's Christmas time and then New Years, so this is taking some extra will power. Having four consecutive days off from work is not helping either.. too much time on my hands.

All in all I am proud of myself. I am on day 6 strictly keeping low carb/high fat, no alcohol and no cigarettes.

Merry Christmas/Happy Holidays to everyone!
I'm really sorry that I wrote such a horribly long, boring post earlier. It's just that I've read a lot of information that seems to address your questions. At first, I wasn't sure how helpful metabolic minutiae would actually be to you. But I think Literate Griffin is right, I should just share the information I have and let you figure out whether or not you can use it.

One more thing: L-tryptophan is a supplement form of the amino acid from which serotonin and melatonin are synthesized. But I believe 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan) -- rather than L-tryptophan -- is the supplement form that is recommended to address depression, sleep problems, and other mood disorders. 5-HTP crosses the blood-brain barrier and, in theory, increases the body's level of serotonin. Studies are fairly inconclusive, though, about whether or not 5-HTP or any form of tryptophan actually increases serotonin levels in a way that corrects mood disorders. Some studies suggests 5-HTP helps and others suggest that these supplements have little or no impact unless they're taken with another substance that shuts down the body's serotonin re-uptake system. Simply producing more serotonin may not actually help relieve the negative symptoms.
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Old 01-04-2013, 01:44 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Trillex View Post
Glycogen depletion is a bit tricky. Liver glycogen is quickly depleted because those glycogen stores are taken out of the liver during any period when the body is deprived of carbohydrates -- to feed the brain and body, and to keep the blood glucose level steady. But the bulk of the body's glycogen is stored in the muscles, and that store of glycogen is (basically) reserved to feed the muscles. Bodybuilders who do ketogenic diets do full-body circuit workouts at the start of a ketogenic cycle -- there's actually a formula for this workout to deplete muscle glycogen stores, based on lean body mass and some other factors which determine the length and intensity of the glycogen-depletion workout -- because the only way to exhaust those muscle glycogen stores is by forcing the muscle tissues to feed on their stored glycogen. Even then, muscle glycogen stores are never *entirely* depleted because working the muscles produces pyruvate and lactate, which generate a small amount of additional muscle glycogen.

The issue of muscle catabolism is also a bit tricky. Scott Connelley is a bodybuilder and surgeon who worked on developing intravenous nutrition for long-term coma patients. A while ago, I read an article by Connelley about the research and work that went into finding a solution for the muscle wasting that coma patients experience. First, researchers thought that the main issue was calories -- give the body enough calories and it will operate, maintain, and build the necessary tissue, they thought -- so the first theory was to feed the body intravenous glucose because glucose is an efficient and easily utilized source. Unfortunately, that didn't work well because the body still catabolized the muscles stores, even while it was being fed excess calories and actually getting fatter. The next theory was to feed the body liquid protein -- the body needs amino acids to maintain and build muscle protein, so the theory was that feeding the body adequate calories as protein would prevent muscle catabolism. That didn't quite correct the problem, either. Even when being fed excess calories and more than a sufficient quantity of protein, the body still catabolized some of its muscle tissue. They found that the best solution was to feed the body a combination of glucose and protein -- the glucose was necessary to create an anabolic (muscle-building) hormonal environment, and the protein provided the amino acids that the muscles need for maintenance and repair. I've just hugely over-simplified the process and the nutritional formula, but that's the basic idea.

A ketogenic diet activates the body's protein-sparing defenses to protect against muscle catabolism -- among other factors, processing a greater amount of ketones causes the kidneys to excrete less nitrogen, which helps preserve muscle tissue because nitrogen is a necessary component of muscle breakdown. These protein-sparing advantages are why most bodybuilding "cutting" diets are ketogenic -- bodybuilders don't want to lose muscle mass while they cut bodyfat. But the situation is complicated, because the ketogenic state is hormonally catabolic -- "catabolism" refers to the breakdown of body tissues, whether those tissues are bodyfat or muscle protein, and the same hormones that create a fat-cutting environment also present a threat to muscle tissue -- so a *muscle-sparing* diet isn't the same as a *muscle-building* diet. This is why most bodybuilding "cutting" diets are "cyclically" ketogenic -- mostly ketogenic, but with periodic glycogen re-feeds. These diets intersperse short periods of feeding the body carbohydrates -- often as a liquid solution that contains 1 part glucose plus 4 parts water -- to create a hormonally anabolic period to grow muscle mass during a fat-cutting ketogenic cycle. Then, as I mentioned earlier, they will do a full-body circuit workout to deplete the glycogen they've stored. The glycogen re-feed creates a hormonally anabolic environment, and the workout takes advantage of this anabolic period to build muscle.

Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek cite a study in The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, in which obese, keto-adapted men added a significant amount of muscle while losing an even greater amount of bodyfat when were put on a progressive-load weight training program while being fed less than 50g carbohydrates per day. The greatest fat loss in the group during the 12 weeks of the study was from a participant who lost 30 scale pounds while gaining 9 pounds of lean body mass -- 9 pounds of muscle mass is A LOT, even for an experienced bodybuilder. So there is some evidence that muscle can be built as well as maintained while keto-adapted.

Based on extensive studies of how the body changes during periods of complete starvation, researchers know that the process of keto-adaptation typically takes between 2-4 weeks. Different bodies take different amounts of time to fully adapt to the process of burning fatty acids instead of glucose because, among other reasons, people have different levels of insulin-resistance and even the amount of insulin-resistance in different muscle cells in the same body can vary. Insulin is the body's hormonal instrument for feeding glucose to the muscle cells so, when the body becomes metabolically damaged in a way that changes the level of insulin-resistance, that damage can complicate the process of re-adapting the cells to process fatty acids as their primary fuel.

In the initial stages of a ketogenic diet -- before the body has become keto-adapted and the muscle cells are able to directly use fatty acids as fuel -- most of the body's cells will continue to require glucose as their primary fuel. So the body will convert the food it's being fed into glucose -- 10% of the dietary fat intake will be converted to glucose (that 10% comes from the glycerol backbone of fatty acids) and 58% of dietary protein will be converted to glucose. If the body's energy needs exceed the amount of glucose that can be produced from dietary carbohydrates, fat, and protein, then the body will preferentially break down muscle stores to produce the necessary amount of glucose. The brain and muscle cells can and will also burn ketones during this period, which means that fat calories can make up for a portion of body's caloric needs. So, simply eating enough calories as fat and protein during this adaptation period should be sufficient to prevent any significant level of muscle catabolism. And the process of keto-adaptation is ongoing, with a rising percentage of body cells re-adjusting their primary fuel preference from glucose to fatty acids each day of the adaptation period -- the brain converts more quickly than the muscle cells because the brain's adaptation to burning ketones is the determinant factor in this conversion, the muscle tissue will burn a progressively lower amount of ketones as the adaptation process continues because the muscles will ultimately be fueled directly by fatty acids whereas the brain will never be fueled directly by fatty acids but will instead be fueled by a combination of approximately 25% glucose and 75% ketones.

THIS JUST BLEW MY MIND!

I've been wary of weight lifting while LCing because I always felt that my strength was super depleted without carbs. I wanted to avoid that because I had really specific strength-related goals. Now, my goals is general body recompositioning. Every piece of 'conventional' body building literature seems to tout high carb as the be-all and end-all of muscle building. I was worrying that I'd need to add carbs, because I really feel best with low carbs, like under 30g. So your whole post just totally inspired me because NINE POUNDS OF MUSCLE.

I'm a girl so 9 lbs of muscle in 12 weeks is probably pretty ridiculous to shoot for, but still.
__________________
<--- this picture is me. I am not pregnant. it's me at about 225 lbs with a FOOD BABY. and food babies are no fun.

Last edited by thealything; 01-04-2013 at 01:47 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 01-04-2013, 02:43 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thealything View Post
THIS JUST BLEW MY MIND!

I've been wary of weight lifting while LCing because I always felt that my strength was super depleted without carbs. I wanted to avoid that because I had really specific strength-related goals. Now, my goals is general body recompositioning. Every piece of 'conventional' body building literature seems to tout high carb as the be-all and end-all of muscle building. I was worrying that I'd need to add carbs, because I really feel best with low carbs, like under 30g. So your whole post just totally inspired me because NINE POUNDS OF MUSCLE.

I'm a girl so 9 lbs of muscle in 12 weeks is probably pretty ridiculous to shoot for, but still.
Except for my dad, the major men in my life are all bodybuilders -- both of my brothers, my uncles, my cousins, ex-boyfriends, etc. Bodybuilding bulking cycles ARE classically hella carb. But bodybuilding "cutting" diets are classically low-carb. The most old-school cutting diet I know of is called the "fish and water" diet, because it meant basically eating nothing except cans of oil-free tuna and drinking lots of water. That diet stretches back to, at least, the 1950s. In the 80s and 90s, Mauro di Pasquale and Dan Duchaine adapted 1970s Atkins into the cyclical ketogenic framework upon which most current cutting diets are based. In the early 2000s, Lyle McDonald adapted di Pasquale's and Duchaine's work into what is currently the predominant approach. McDonald's diet isn't *the thing* anymore, but adaptations of it still are. Martin Berkhan's "Leangains" looks like it might represent the next wave. He claims it's a growth plan as well as a cutting diet, but all new bodybuilding cutting diets initially make that claim.

Martin Berkhan doesn't have a book yet, although he's been claiming to write one for, like, a couple of years. But he puts all of his research and info on his blog, anyway. He hasn't posted anything in a while, but his most recent post is about women and muscle:
I made this album to make yet another point about women and weight training. Isa competes in strongman, took two gold medals in the recent European Powerlifting Championsship, and squats, deadlifts, presses, throws tires and runs around with some heavy *edit* I don't even know the name of.

Not an ounce of bulky muscle or a iota of freakishness to her. In spite of doing the complete opposite of what most are told on how to train - in the media, womens mags, by friends, but also within communities that should know better (i.e. physique competitors). The result is a good and healthy look. Leaner than most, and most definitely stronger. No cardio, just heavy weights 3x/week and no soy cracker and tofu style diet.
Train Like A Man, Look Like A Goddess | Intermittent fasting diet for fat loss, muscle gain and health

If you're really REALLY interested in low-carbing and bodybuilding, you should pick up a copy of Lyle McDonald's "The Ketogenic Diet." It's expensive and difficult to get a print copy. But it's a bodybuilding cult classic, so you can definitely find an electronic copy online. That book explains everything anyone has ever wanted to know about ketogenic diets and muscle development. It was written 15 years ago. It's difficult to read because it's so technical. Lyle's personality is incredibly annoying throughout the book. But it's still the absolute most thorough and authoritative book on the topic of ketogenic diets and muscle.

For a general overview of the history of grow vs cut in bodybuilding culture, McDonald's website has a pretty good and relatively short article on the topic:

General Philosophies of Muscle Mass Gain | BodyRecomposition - The Home of Lyle McDonald
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